India's make-or-break budget

Finance Minister Arun Jaitley (C) poses as he leaves his office to present the 2015/16 budget in New Delhi February 28, 2015. REUTERS/Vijay Mathur

Prime Minister Narendra Modi's stomach for free-market economics faces a major test on Saturday, in a budget India's top economic advisor has warned could wreck the leader's promises of "good days" if there's no roadmap to reform.  Full Article | Full Coverage 

A labourer carries pipes at the construction site of a residential complex in Mumbai February 27, 2015. REUTERS/Shailesh Andrade
Economic Survey

Growth to jump amid shrinking deficit

The Economic Survey forecast growth of 8.1 percent to 8.5 percent under new calculations that make India the world's most dynamic big economy. The forecast marks an acceleration from growth of 7.4 percent in the current fiscal year.  Full Article | Related Story 

Medics lift the body of Boris Nemtsov who was shot dead in central Moscow, February 28, 2015. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

Russian opposition leader Nemtsov shot dead

Russian opposition politician Boris Nemtsov, an outspoken critic of President Vladimir Putin and Russia's involvement in the war in Ukraine, was shot dead steps from the Kremlin.  Full Article | Video 

Logan Huff, Soy Plant Specialist Lead, examines corn plants in the Monsanto research facility in Chesterfield, Missouri, July 28, 2014.  REUTERS/Tom Gannam/Files
Agriculture

Monsanto: GM corn trial in final stage in India

Monsanto's Indian subsidiary expects to submit final trial results for its GM corn to lawmakers within a year for the government to then decide on a commercial launch, the company's country head said. India does not currently allow the growing of GM food crops but the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, keen to improve farms' productivity, has encouraged open field trials after a five-year de facto ban.  Full Article 

A man walks past Sahara India Complex building in Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi February 25, 2015. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
Sahara's Woes

Sahara portfolio management license cancelled

The Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) has cancelled the portfolio management license of Sahara's asset management division, in yet another setback for a conglomerate that is trying to raise $1.6 billion to free its jailed boss.  Full Article 

Actor Leonard Nimoy's picture is painted on a storefront security gate along Hollywood Boulevard  in Hollywood, California in this February 22, 2012 file photo. REUTERS/Mike Blake

Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek's 'Spock,' dies at 83

Leonard Nimoy, who won fame and fans with his portrayal of logic-bound, half-alien Mr. Spock in the "Star Trek" TV series and movies, died on Friday. He was 83.  Full Article 

Tiger Woods hits his drive on the 12th during the first round of the Farmers Insurance Open golf tournament at Torrey Pines Municipal Golf Course - South Co. Mandatory Credit: Jake Roth-USA TODAY Sports

Masters countdown ticks fast for Tiger

As the clock counts down for the April 9-12 Masters, fans, players and medical experts continue to speculate on whether a shockingly out-of-sorts Tiger Woods will be able to compete.  Full Article 

"Dum Laga Ke Haisha": Rooted in reality

"Dum Laga Ke Haisha": rooted in reality

This is one of those films that you have to pay close attention to if you want to enjoy it to the full. There is so much to like here – the attention to detail, the quirky characters; and you are likely to miss it if your attention wavers to your phone or your popcorn.  Full Article 

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Expert Zone

Paul Donovan

A global lesson from Europe

“The euro area is in crisis” is not the most thrilling way to open an article. The region is seemingly always in crisis, resembling an opera by Wagner – very, very long, with lots of wailing and melodrama, generally conducted in German. The perpetual round of emergency summits and last-minute deals is something investors have had to get used to.  Full Article 

David Wise

How much does it cost to watch a suspected militant? Lots.

Surveillance is a double-edged tool. Catching terrorists is vital to protect the country. But we also want to live in a society where liberty and security are balanced, and the government does not follow people around without good reason. From that perspective, the high cost and difficulty of maintaining a continuous surveillance on a suspect may not be entirely bad in a democracy.  Opinion 

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