Pakistan, India joust after peace talks deadlock

ISLAMABAD/NEW DELHI Fri Jul 16, 2010 6:42pm IST

India's Foreign Minister S.M. Krishna (L) and his Pakistani counterpart Shah Mehmood Qureshi take questions from the media during a joint news conference in Islamabad July 15, 2010. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

India's Foreign Minister S.M. Krishna (L) and his Pakistani counterpart Shah Mehmood Qureshi take questions from the media during a joint news conference in Islamabad July 15, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Adrees Latif

Related Topics

ISLAMABAD/NEW DELHI (Reuters) - Pakistan said on Friday that India's "selective" approach to issues has led to what analysts say is a stalemate in talks aimed to build trust shattered by the 2008 Mumbai attacks.

Pakistan Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi and his Indian counterpart S.M. Krishna met in Islamabad on Thursday and agreed on more talks but failed to announce any concrete measures that might soothe tensions between the nuclear-armed neighbours.

Then, at a joint news conference immediately after the talks the two openly sparred, underscoring the air of mistrust between the rivals who have fought three wars since independence from Britain in 1947.

"I could see from yesterday's talks that they want to be selective. When they say all issues are on the table then they cannot, they should not, be selective," Qureshi told reporters after attending a ceremony for new diplomats in Islamabad.

"Progress in talks can only be possible if we move forward on all issues in tandem."

But Krishna played down the differences, possibly in keeping with an India trying to move away from a decades-old obsession with Pakistan, seduced more by its growing role in the global economy and concerns with other security issues like China.

"Well I am not going to score debating points over Foreign Minister Qureshi," Krishna said after returning from Islamabad.

"I would like to concentrate on the serious issues, and the fact of the matter is that we did discuss many issues which are of great concern to both of us, both countries, and we think we have made some headway."

Security remains India's top concern after the attack on Mumbai by Pakistani militants, which killed 166 people. After Thursday's talks, Krishna repeated New Delhi's call for Islamabad to speed up efforts to bring the perpetrators to justice.

India blames Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) militants for the attacks, and in remarks published in an Indian newspaper on Wednesday, Indian Home Secretary G.K. Pillai accused Pakistan's main spy agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), of orchestrating the assault on India's financial centre.

India has linked the relaunching of peace talks between the two South Asian rivals with Pakistan's action against the perpetrators of the attack.

But Qureshi warned against India's attitude.

"If we give heed to those issues which they consider important and those issues in which Pakistan is interested are neglected then things cannot move forward," he said.

"They have to sit with an open mind and we have to move forward with an open heart."

KEEPING ALIVE DIALOGUE

Pakistan wants discussions on other issues, including its core dispute with India over the Himalayan region of Kashmir, the cause of two of their three wars. Kashmir is divided between the two countries.

On Friday, India reimposed a curfew in parts of Kashmir where India is fighting a two-decade-old separatist insurgency. Huge anti-India protests have swept the region over the past month.

While the latest round of talks may have not done much to clear the air of mistrust, the two countries are likely to keep alive dialogue because India would want to boost the credibility of Pakistan's civilian government in the face of military hawks.

Also, both sides have been under pressure from the United States to reduce tensions because their rivalry is often played out in Afghanistan and complicates efforts to bring peace there.

"I don't see this as a temporary setback because here we are looking at a lengthy, complex process," said Siddharth Varadarajan, strategic affairs editor of the Hindu newspaper.

"Part of such a process will mean having a more dense calendar of meetings, and they will proceed on the deliverables like cross-border trade and Sir Creek," he said, referring to a maritime border dispute in the area of the Sir Creek estuary.

Indian officials said the two countries could meet in the coming months to try to "enlarge the constituency of convergence" such as in trade and culture.

(Extra reporting by Augustine Anthony in Islamabad; Sheikh Mushtaq in Srinagar and Bappa Majumdar in New Delhi; Editing by Chris Allbritton and Paul de Bendern)

(For more news on Reuters India, click in.reuters.com)

FILED UNDER:
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

  • Most Popular
  • Most Shared

Public Health

REUTERS SHOWCASE

Border Dispute

Border Dispute

China expresses concern about Indian plan to build border posts  Full Article 

Sri Lanka Landslide

Sri Lanka Landslide

No hope for survivors in Sri Lanka landslide, over 100 dead.  Full Article | Slideshow 

Logistics Potential

Logistics Potential

India's delivery men offer prize investment as billions pour into e-commerce.  Full Article 

Samsung Results

Samsung Results

Samsung seeks smartphone revamp to arrest profit slide.  Full Article 

Out Of The Closet

Out Of The Closet

Apple's Tim Cook says "proud to be gay"  Full Article 

Entertainment Buzz

Entertainment Buzz

Film-maker Shonali Bose hopes to take gay issues out of the closet.  Full Article 

Fighting IS

Fighting IS

Iraqi Kurdish forces enter Syria to fight Islamic State  Full Article 

Fighting Ebola

Fighting Ebola

Ebola appears to be slowing in Liberia - WHO.  Full Article 

End Of QE

End Of QE

Fed ends bond buying, exhibits confidence in U.S. recovery.  Full Article 

Reuters India Mobile

Reuters India Mobile

Get the latest news on the go. Visit Reuters India on your mobile device.  Full Coverage