Nepal's former king Gyanendra to lose state perks

KATHMANDU Fri Dec 9, 2011 6:05pm IST

Former King Gyanendra Shah speaks to the media after inaugurating former Crown Princess Himani Shah's non-governmental organization ''Himani Fund'' in Kathmandu October 8, 2010. REUTES/Navesh Chitrakar/Files

Former King Gyanendra Shah speaks to the media after inaugurating former Crown Princess Himani Shah's non-governmental organization ''Himani Fund'' in Kathmandu October 8, 2010. REUTES/Navesh Chitrakar/Files

Related Topics

Kishore Pandey, 82, lies on a bed as his daughter, Usha Tiwari, holds him and a priest stands by them (L) at Mukti Bhavan (Salvation House) in Varanasi, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, June 19, 2014. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Waiting to die at Salvation House

The city of Varanasi is Hinduism's holiest city and many Hindus believe that dying there and having their remains scattered in the Ganges allows their soul to escape a cycle of death and rebirth.  Slideshow 

KATHMANDU (Reuters) - Maoist-led Nepal will cut perks to former King Gyanendra and his family, a Supreme Court official said on Friday, three years after the Himalayan nation abolished the centuries-old monarchy.

A specially elected assembly dominated by the Maoist former rebels overwhelmingly voted to topple the 239-year-old monarchy in 2008 and turned the desperately poor country into a republic.

Until now, the government has allowed Gyanendra to continue using one of his former hunting lodges, and provided cars and fuel to him and his family in addition to normal security personnel.

But the Supreme Court, in a landmark decision on Thursday, said the facilities provided to Gyanendra through executive decisions were illegal and must be stopped.

"Facilities given to the former king and members of his family are not within the purview of law," Supreme Court official Hemanta Rawal told Reuters.

"If the government wants to give such facilities it must first make necessary laws. Without such legislations, state funds can't be distributed," Rawal said referring to the court order given in response to a petition.

Gyanendra became king in 2001 after a palace massacre in which his popular brother King Birendra and most of his family members were killed by then Crown Prince Dipendra, according to a government investigation. Dipendra, who also killed himself, was allegedly angry over the family's refusal to allow him to marry the woman of his choice.

But Gyanendra became unpopular after he sacked the elected government and took over absolute powers in 2005. He gave in to popular street protests a year later. Gyanendra now lives as a commoner with his family at his private home in an upmarket area in the Nepali capital.

Rawal said the court also ordered the government to stop perks and privileges like expensive cars and fuel provided by the state to some former prime ministers and ministers saying such facilities were also illegal.

A special constituent assembly, dominated by the Maoists, has until May next year to prepare Nepal's new constitution, the first republican charter after the abolition of the monarchy.

FILED UNDER:
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

  • Most Popular
  • Most Shared

India-Nepal Ties

TOP SHOWCASE

Strategic Plans

Strategic Plans

China plans railway to India, Nepal borders by 2020.  Full Article 

Mideast Conflict

Mideast Conflict

U.S. lifts ban on flights to Israel as Gaza toll tops 700.  Full Article 

Food Scandal

Food Scandal

China probes 581 firms, restaurants as food safety scare spreads.  Full Article 

Virtual Risks

Virtual Risks

Flaws could expose users of privacy-protecting software, researchers say.  Full Article 

Facebook Results

Facebook Results

Q2 beats Wall Street targets, stock hits record high  Full Article 

Opening Ceremony

Opening Ceremony

Song and dance at the 2014 Commonwealth Games.  Slideshow 

Just Not Cricket

Just Not Cricket

ICC rejects 2018 offer, cricket stays out of Commonwealth Games.  Full Article 

Photographers' Blog

Photographers' Blog

Waiting to die in Varanasi.  Full Article 

Reuters India Mobile

Reuters India Mobile

Get the latest news on the go. Visit Reuters India on your mobile device.  Full Coverage