Pakistan's Zardari says not leaving office

ISLAMABAD Sun Jan 8, 2012 12:26am IST

Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari, widower of assassinated former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, raises his hands in prayer at her grave to mark her death anniversary at the Bhutto family mausoleum in Garhi Khuda Bakhsh, near Larkana December 26, 2011. REUTERS/Nadeem Soomro

Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari, widower of assassinated former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, raises his hands in prayer at her grave to mark her death anniversary at the Bhutto family mausoleum in Garhi Khuda Bakhsh, near Larkana December 26, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Nadeem Soomro

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari has said leaving office is not an option and that no one has asked him to resign, responding to speculation that the powerful military wanted his departure.

"No one has asked for it yet. If someone does, I'll tell you," Zardari, who appeared in good spirits after medical treatment in Dubai last month, said in a pre-recorded interview with one of the country's most popular television anchors.

(Reporting by Qasim Nauman; Editing by Michael Georgy)

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