PREVIEW - Spain debt costs to jump as euro doubts simmer

MADRID Mon Jun 18, 2012 8:59pm IST

Euro notes are pictured at a bank in this photo illustration taken in Seoul June 18, 2012. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

Euro notes are pictured at a bank in this photo illustration taken in Seoul June 18, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Lee Jae-Won

Related Topics

MADRID (Reuters) - Spain is likely to pay record high rates to borrow at debt auctions this week after the Greek election failed to ease concerns about the future of the euro zone and amid uncertainty over whether Madrid will need a full sovereign bailout.

The yield on Spanish 10-year bonds hit a fresh high of above 7 percent on Monday, jumping by as much as 37 basis points, as initial relief over the victory of pro-bailout parties in Greece gave way to ongoing fears of deeper problems facing the bloc.

Seven percent is considered too pricey for a country to afford over the long term. Such levels have previously led to bailouts in Greece, Ireland and Portugal.

Spain's Treasury will issue between 2 billion and 3 billion euros of 12- and 18-month debt on Tuesday and between 1 billion and 2 billion euros of bonds due in 2014, 2015 and 2017 on Thursday.

Monday's market response to the Greek election -- in which parties committed to the conditions of a European Union/International Monetary Fund bailout won by a narrow margin -- suggest the prognosis is not good.

"It looks as though the market's broken now. I don't think there's anything the Spanish can do to bring it back. I don't think the ECB can bring it back... (a full sovereign bailout for Spain) is inevitable," said Harvinder Sian, a rate strategist at London-based RBS.

"With the (G20) summit not looking like it will produce anything particularly dramatic to help in the crisis situation, I think the market's made its statement. There has to be a change in the way the Europeans are attacking the crisis."

World leaders meeting in Mexico for a G20 summit on Monday are expected to push European leaders to outline a lasting strategy to save the euro currency and end financial turmoil.

BAILOUT WORRIES

Spain, the euro zone's fourth largest economy and more than twice the size of bailed-out euro zone partners Greece, Portugal and Ireland combined, is at the centre of market jitters as it struggles with a deep recession and banking sector restructure.

The 12-month T-bill was trading on Monday in the secondary market, considered a good guide of primary auction yields, at around 4.1 percent while and equivalent 18-month bill was trading at a yield of above 4.4 percent.

Yields on both bills passed 5 percent in November but later retreated to below 4 percent for several months. L ast month, the 12-month auctioned at 2.985 percent and the 18-month bills auctioned at 3.302 percent.

Thursday may be a bigger test, when Spain auctions bonds maturing April 30, 2014, July 30, 2015 and July 30, 2017.

On Monday, the 2014 bond was trading at around 5.3 percent compared with 2.069 percent at its last primary auction on March 1. The 2015 bond was trading at 6 percent after 4.876 percent on May 17 and the 2017 was trading at 6.5 percent, compared with 4.96 percent on May 3.

Spain's economy is under heavy pressure.

It entered its second recession since 2009 in the first quarter, and while it has barely grown at all since the property bubble burst in early 2009, most economists expect the economy to continue to shrink into next year at least.

Unemployment is over 24 percent, more than half all young Spaniards are out of work and deep spending cuts to tame one of the euro zone's largest public deficits are expected to prolong the downturn as investment plummets.

(Editing by Fiona Ortiz/Jeremy Gaunt)

FILED UNDER:
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

  • Most Popular
  • Most Shared

Healthcare Corruption

REUTERS SHOWCASE

Short of Expectations

Short of Expectations

Apple revenue lags Street's view despite strong China growth  Full Article 

Mircosoft Results

Mircosoft Results

Microsoft revenue rises, profit falls as Nokia absorbed  Full Article 

Deal Talk

Deal Talk

Exclusive - Lupin, U.S. firms weigh bids for GSK's mature drugs: sources  Full Article 

Relief For Sahara

Relief For Sahara

Supreme Court could allow Sahara boss to conduct asset sale talks, company says.  Full Article 

Classifying Banks

Classifying Banks

RBI to start announcing too-big-to-fail banks in Aug 2015  Full Article 

Food Scandal

Food Scandal

Starbucks, Burger King dragged in as China food scandal spreads.  Full Article 

Reuters India Mobile

Reuters India Mobile

Get the latest news on the go. Visit Reuters India on your mobile device.  Full Coverage