100 mln will die by 2030 if world fails to act on climate - report

LONDON Wed Sep 26, 2012 4:44am IST

Rain clouds gather as a skytrain passes the victory monument in Bangkok September 25, 2012. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom

Rain clouds gather as a skytrain passes the victory monument in Bangkok September 25, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Chaiwat Subprasom

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LONDON (Reuters) - More than 100 million people will die and global economic growth will be cut by 3.2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) by 2030 if the world fails to tackle climate change, a report commissioned by 20 governments said on Wednesday.

As global average temperatures rise due to greenhouse gas emissions, the effects on the planet, such as melting ice caps, extreme weather, drought and rising sea levels, will threaten populations and livelihoods, said the report conducted by humanitarian organisation DARA.

It calculated that five million deaths occur each year from air pollution, hunger and disease as a result of climate change and carbon-intensive economies, and that toll would likely rise to six million a year by 2030 if current patterns of fossil fuel use continue.

More than 90 percent of those deaths will occur in developing countries, said the report that calculated the human and economic impact of climate change on 184 countries in 2010 and 2030. It was commissioned by the Climate Vulnerable Forum, a partnership of 20 developing countries threatened by climate change.

"A combined climate-carbon crisis is estimated to claim 100 million lives between now and the end of the next decade," the report said.

It said the effects of climate change had lowered global output by 1.6 percent of world GDP, or by about $1.2 trillion a year, and losses could double to 3.2 percent of global GDP by 2030 if global temperatures are allowed to rise, surpassing 10 percent before 2100.

It estimated the cost of moving the world to a low-carbon economy at about 0.5 percent of GDP this decade.

COUNTING THE COST

British economist Nicholas Stern told Reuters earlier this year investment equivalent to 2 percent of global GDP was needed to limit, prevent and adapt to climate change. His report on the economics of climate change in 2006 said an average global temperature rise of 2-3 degrees Celsius in the next 50 years could reduce global consumption per head by up to 20 percent.

Temperatures have already risen by about 0.8 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times. Almost 200 nations agreed in 2010 to limit the global average temperature rise to below 2C (3.6 Fahrenheit) to avoid dangerous impacts from climate change.

But climate scientists have warned that the chance of limiting the rise to below 2C is getting smaller as global greenhouse gas emissions rise due to burning fossil fuels.

The world's poorest nations are the most vulnerable as they face increased risk of drought, water shortages, crop failure, poverty and disease. On average, they could see an 11 percent loss in GDP by 2030 due to climate change, DARA said.

"One degree Celsius rise in temperature is associated with 10 percent productivity loss in farming. For us, it means losing about 4 million metric tonnes of food grain, amounting to about $2.5 billion. That is about 2 percent of our GDP," Bangladesh's Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina said in response to the report.

"Adding up the damages to property and other losses, we are faced with a total loss of about 3-4 percent of GDP."

Even the biggest and most rapidly developing economies will not escape unscathed. The United States and China could see a 2.1 percent reduction in their respective GDPs by 2030, while India could experience a more than 5 percent loss.

The full report is available at: daraint.org/

(Editing by Janet Lawrence)

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Comments (9)
ertdfg1 wrote:
By 2010 we were told we’d have 50 MILLION CLIMATE REFUGEES!!!!

Where are they? Oh, that didn’t happen? But let me guess, THIS TIME THE WORLD WILL END IF WE DON’T GIVE ALL POWER TO THE CLIMATE SCIENTISTS!!!!

Sorry, you’ve never once been right, you’ve claimed the “DOOMSDAY” scenarios so often I laugh when I read them.

There is no wolf… quit crying like you’ve seen one.

Sep 27, 2012 7:01am IST  --  Report as abuse
Helyn wrote:
In Phoenix, AZ, where I have lived the last 60 years, we have had one of the coolest summers ever; shorter and not as hot, generally. There have always been cyclical hot, dry spells. Tree rings give a much more accurate look at these cycles and I don’t believe they can be as easily manipulated. The world economy cannot afford these expensive means that are not as accurate as “science” claims.

Sep 27, 2012 8:31am IST  --  Report as abuse
GortRules wrote:
Hey, I’ve got an idea. Let’s tax everyone in the industrialized countries at a 100% rate for the next 20 years and give that money to the developing nations so they can have a better life. In fact, let’s force the wealthy globe killers to give up their entire wealth…now.

Sep 27, 2012 8:33am IST  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

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