EXCLUSIVE - UN chief wants Italy's Prodi as envoy to troubled Sahel

UNITED NATIONS Sat Oct 6, 2012 9:24am IST

Former Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi attends the Ambrosetti workshop in Cernobbio, next to Como September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Paolo Bona

Former Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi attends the Ambrosetti workshop in Cernobbio, next to Como September 7, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Paolo Bona

Related Topics

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon told the Security Council on Friday he wants former Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi to be his envoy to the troubled Sahel region, where West African states seek U.N. backing for military intervention in Mali.

"I would like to inform you of my intention to appoint Mr. Romano Prodi (Italy) as my Special Envoy for the Sahel," Ban said in a letter to the 15-nation council, obtained by Reuters.

"Mr. Prodi has a long and distinguished career in government and international diplomacy as a consensus-builder, having served as Prime Minister of Italy and President of the European Commission for several years," he wrote to the president of the council, Guatemalan U.N. Ambassador Gert Rosenthal.

Rosenthal informed fellow council members in an accompanying letter that he would acknowledge Ban's decision to appoint Prodi if no objections were presented to him by Tuesday at 10 a.m. EDT (1400 GMT).

Mali descended into chaos in March when soldiers toppled the president, leaving a power vacuum that enabled Tuareg rebels to seize two-thirds of the country. But Islamist extremists, some al Qaeda allies, hijacked the revolt in the north.

The conflict in Mali has also exacerbated a deteriorating humanitarian and security situation in the turbulent Sahel region - a belt of land spanning nearly a dozen of the world's poorest countries on the southern rim of the Sahara - where millions are on the brink of starvation due to drought.

West Africa's regional body, ECOWAS, has mapped out a three- phase operation to help Malian troops recapture the north, and Mali's interim leader, Dioncounda Traore, asked the Security Council earlier this month to authorize the force.

Council diplomats say ECOWAS needs to present a more coherent and comprehensive plan for military intervention in Mali before they authorize it.

French U.N. Ambassador Gerard Araud said on Thursday that he would shortly circulate a resolution to energize the African response. It would not yet authorize a military intervention by an international force, but would instead set a deadline for ECOWAS and the African Union to provide the Security Council with details of the operation.

ECOWAS has intervened militarily in past African conflicts, including the wars in Liberia and Sierra Leone.

(Editing by Peter Cooney)

FILED UNDER:
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

  • Most Popular
  • Most Shared

EBOLA OUTBREAK

REUTERS SHOWCASE

HK Protest

HK Protest

Prolonged Hong Kong protest could harm financial image, says envoy.  Full Article 

Climate Change

Climate Change

Cap on liability for climate damage worth a look - expert.  Full Article 

Caught in Korea

Caught in Korea

Third American held in N.Korea appeals to U.S. for help - report.  Full Article 

Expanding Range

Expanding Range

North Korea, already under UN sanctions, prepares launch site for longer-range rockets - report.  Full Article 

Syria Crisis

Syria Crisis

Massacre in Syrian Kurdish town would end PKK's peace talks with Turkey - Ocalan.  Full Article 

Road Offences

Road Offences

France's Le Pen loses driving licence, but says not her fault.  Full Article 

Nuclear Deal

Nuclear Deal

Israel's Netanyahu to Obama: Don't allow Iran deal that leaves it at nuclear threshold.  Full Article 

Germany Politics

Germany Politics

German defence crisis puts potential Merkel successor in hot seat .  Full Article 

Peace Conference

Peace Conference

Nobel Laureates condemn South Africa visa denial to Dalai Lama.  Full Article 

Reuters India Mobile

Reuters India Mobile

Get the latest news on the go. Visit Reuters India on your mobile device.  Full Coverage