Tired Djokovic primed for one final challenge

LONDON Mon Nov 5, 2012 5:02pm IST

Novak Djokovic of Serbia speaks at a news conference ahead of the ATP tennis finals at the O2 Arena in London November 4, 2012. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Novak Djokovic of Serbia speaks at a news conference ahead of the ATP tennis finals at the O2 Arena in London November 4, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Toby Melville

Border Security Force (BSF) soldiers ride their camels as they rehearse for the "Beating the Retreat" ceremony in New Delhi January 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ahmad Masood

"Beating The Retreat" Rehearsals

Rehearsals are on for "Beating the Retreat" ceremony which symbolises retreat after a day on the battlefield, and marks the official end of the Republic Day celebrations.  Slideshow 

LONDON (Reuters) - A tired sounding Novak Djokovic says he will need to draw on all his mental and physical strength if he is to crown another stellar season with the ATP World Tour Finals title.

The Serb heads into his opening match with Frenchman Jo-Wilfried Tsonga on Monday safe in the knowledge that he will end the year as the world number one for the second consecutive year.

Whether he can add a sixth title to his 2012 resume, which includes the Australian Open, will depend on how his body has recovered since he was knocked out of the Paris Masters by American Sam Querrey on Wednesday.

He admitted after the match he began to struggle physically during the second set, having won the first.

"I want to give my best and at this moment I'm trying to be as optimistic as possible," Djokovic, winner of the season-ending showpiece when it was staged in Shanghai in 2008, told a Sunday news conference at London's 02 Arena which is hosting the event for the fourth year running.

"It's expected to not always on your top form and especially at this time of year the effects of the long season can influence you physically and mentally also, but as I said, this is a very important tournament.

"I definitely want to do well, find the mental and physical strength to perform my best and we'll see if that best will be good enough."

As well as a weary body, reports from Serbia have said the 25-year-old's father was ill, an issue Djokovic was not keen to elaborate on.

"It's not the right moment for me to be talking about these things right, I just want to talk about the tennis tournament."

ENDING ON A HIGH

Regardless of his result in London's docklands, where he has also been drawn to face great rival Andy Murray and Czech Tomas Berdych, he will finish the season as top dog in men's tennis.

He lost the tag to Swiss Roger Federer in July, but will take it back this week in a season that has seen him pocket more than $8 million in prize money.

"It means a lot, for all of us from our team, we are very proud of what we've achieved in 2012," he said of reclaiming top spot. "It's definitely not easy ending the year as number one considering the competition that we had this year, and I'm very happy and very proud and this can only serve as a great confidence boost for me for upcoming years."

While much has been made of his fierce battles with London-based Scot Murray, which has seen Djokovic prevail in the Australian Open semi-finals in a match lasting close to five hours before Murray took revenge at the same stage of the London Olympics and then in the remarkable five-set U.S Open final, he preferred to dwell on season where four different players - himself, Murray, Federer and injured Rafael Nadal - won a major.

"For me, it's great to be part of that rivalry, to be part of this era between four of us really good players, and we are trying to bring the sport to another level, and it's really nice to see these rivalries are evolving, these rivalries are getting stronger, and more competitive," he said.

TSONGA CHALLENGE

Djokovic said the round-robin format of the tournament was a nice change from the usual knockout tennis players encountered, as you could still make the semi-finals having lost a match.

He hopes to get off to a good start against world number seven Tsonga however, who he beat in the final of the China Open last month.

"We always have good battles, tough battles, he is a big server and he is the kind of player that feeds off the energy of the crowd," he said.

"He played finals here last year, it's going to be very difficult for both of us." (Reporting by Josh Reich; editing by Martyn Herman)

Photo

After wave of QE, onus shifts to leaders to boost economy

DAVOS, Switzerland - Central banks have done their best to rescue the world economy by printing money and politicians must now act fast to enact structural reforms and pro-investment policies to boost growth, central bankers said on Saturday.

Reuters Showcase

ONGC Share Sale

ONGC Share Sale

ONGC share sale scheduled for this fiscal - oil minister  Full Article 

The Apple logo is pictured inside the newly opened Omotesando Apple store at a shopping district in Tokyo June 26, 2014. REUTERS/Yuya Shino/Files

Record Earnings

Apple iPhone sales trample expectations as profit sets global record  Full Article 

'Umrika' At Sundance

'Umrika' At Sundance

From Oscars to Sundance, Sharma and Revolori discuss India's 'Umrika'  Full Article 

Australian Open

Australian Open

Smooth Wawrinka, ill Serena through to Melbourne semis   Full Article 

India's Male Tenor

India's Male Tenor

India's lone male tenor aims to sing opera in local key  Full Article 

Japan Hostages

Japan Hostages

Mother of Japanese captive begs PM to save son held by Islamic State  Full Article 

Tripoli Attack

Tripoli Attack

Frenchman, American among those killed in Tripoli hotel attack - Libyan official.  Full Article 

U.S. Blizzard

U.S. Blizzard

Blizzard hits Boston and New England, spares New York despite forecasts.  Full Article 

Spying Row

Spying Row

Spying program leaked by Snowden is tied to campaign in many countries.  Full Article 

Reuters India Mobile

Reuters India Mobile

Get the latest news on the go. Visit Reuters India on your mobile device  Full Coverage