Gadget-free and shopping sprees rule travel trends

LONDON Mon Nov 5, 2012 11:02pm IST

People cycle through the snow-covered landscape near the Swiss village of Hirzel south of Zurich October 31, 2012. Reuters/Arnd Wiegmann

People cycle through the snow-covered landscape near the Swiss village of Hirzel south of Zurich October 31, 2012. Reuters/Arnd Wiegmann

Related Topics

Border Security Force (BSF) soldiers ride their camels as they rehearse for the "Beating the Retreat" ceremony in New Delhi January 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ahmad Masood

"Beating The Retreat" Rehearsals

Rehearsals are on for "Beating the Retreat" ceremony which symbolises retreat after a day on the battlefield, and marks the official end of the Republic Day celebrations.  Slideshow 

LONDON (Reuters) - Luxury shopping trips for the nouveaux riches, gadget-free accommodation and booking holidays on smart TVs are some of the future travel trends predicted in a new report released on Monday.

The "Global Trends Report" by market research firm Euromonitor International predicted a continued rise in holiday packages which cater to tourists on shopping trips, a recovery in Middle East visits following the Arab Spring and Americans interested in destinations that have previously been off-limits.

Shoppers from Brazil, Russia, India and China, the so-called BRIC countries with rapidly growing economies, were expected to flock to European cities to splurge on luxury goods.

Euromonitor based this trend on fast-growing affluent middle classes among the BRICs, as well as the high import taxes on luxury goods back home.

"We know that Chinese tourists are more and more travelling in groups across Europe and shopping is one of their main activities," Euromonitor travel analyst Paz Casal said at the World Travel Market in London on Monday.

"This will only become more pronounced in the next five years."

Chinese visitors to Europe alone reserve a third of their holiday budget for shopping, the European Travel Commission estimates and 95 percent of Chinese visitors of Louis Vuitton shops in Paris are on organised tours, according to Euromonitor.

Hotels in the Middle East are locating within or beside shopping malls to take advantage of the trend and nine major malls are due for completion across the region between 2012 and 2014. One of these, Yas Mall in Abu Dhabi, will be home to seven hotels.

After experiencing a 10 percent fall in tourism last year during the fallout from the Arab Spring, 2012 is promising to end with positive growth for the Middle East. This is forecast to continue into 2013 and beyond.

Indian travellers are helping a tourism boom in the Gulf by heading in large numbers to the region's souks to purchase precious metals for wedding gifts and investment.

Although the report maintains that any growth in tourism arrivals will come from the relatively new outbound markets of Asia Pacific, Latin America and Eastern Europe, U.S. travellers are showing a particular interest in flocking to countries that have previously been off limits such as North Korea, Libya, Cuba and Myanmar thanks to the easing of travel restrictions.

American tourism to Myanmar is expected to rise by 71 percent by 2016, says Euromonitor.

Smart TVs are also highlighted in the report as vital new platforms for travel marketers seeking to use the device to directly connect consumers to the market by enabling them to make immediate bookings through the TV or via travel apps and Internet links.

"The next big thing is to have a presence on these machines," Euromonitor's travel and tourism research head Caroline Bremner told Reuters. "With 50 percent penetration by 2014, it's going to be fast adoption."

On the flipside, customers will also want to be prised away from their technological gizmos on "digital detox" holidays in gadget-free hotels or those which offer incentives to put down the "crackberry" for a while.

Relaxing holiday options like spa, cruise and rail sojourns were also expected to perform particularly well through 2016.

(Reporting By Peter Myers, editing by Paul Casciato)

FILED UNDER:
Photo

After wave of QE, onus shifts to leaders to boost economy

DAVOS, Switzerland - Central banks have done their best to rescue the world economy by printing money and politicians must now act fast to enact structural reforms and pro-investment policies to boost growth, central bankers said on Saturday.

ENTERTAINMENT

Reuters Showcase

Facebook Earnings

Facebook Earnings

Facebook tops Wall Street revenue target in 4th quarter.  Full Article 

Japanese Hostage

Japanese Hostage

Jordan prisoner swap on hold, fate of Japanese IS hostage unclear.  Full Article 

Cricket World Cup

Cricket World Cup

Batting holds key for team India in World Cup  Full Article 

Australian Open

Australian Open

Djokovic, Wawrinka set up epic showdown, ill Serena through  Full Article 

India's Male Tenor

India's Male Tenor

India's lone male tenor aims to sing opera in local key  Full Article 

Rohingya Muslims

Rohingya Muslims

Rohingya refugees say traffickers in Malaysia abuse and kill.  Full Article 

U.S. Blizzard

U.S. Blizzard

Blizzard hits Boston and New England, spares New York despite forecasts.  Full Article 

Spying Row

Spying Row

Spying program leaked by Snowden is tied to campaign in many countries.  Full Article 

Reuters India Mobile

Reuters India Mobile

Get the latest news on the go. Visit Reuters India on your mobile device  Full Coverage