Secondhand smoke at five major airports puts flyers at risk: CDC

ATLANTA Wed Nov 21, 2012 4:47am IST

Related Topics

Priyanka Gandhi Vadra, daughter of Congress party chief Sonia Gandhi, adjusts her flower garlands as she campaigns for her mother during an election meeting at Rae Bareli in Uttar Pradesh April 22, 2014. REUTERS/Pawan Kumar

Election 2014

More than 814 million people — a number larger than the population of Europe — are eligible to vote in the world’s biggest democratic exercise.  Full Coverage 

ATLANTA (Reuters) - Thanksgiving travelers who pass through the five major U.S. airports that still allow indoor smoking in designated public rooms face a hidden health hazard, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Tuesday.

A study by the federal health agency found that secondhand smoke levels directly outside public smoking areas were five times higher than the levels in smoke-free airports.

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International, Washington Dulles International, McCarran International in Las Vegas, Denver International and Salt Lake City International are the only five of the nation's 29 largest airports that still have indoor smoking areas accessible to the general public, the CDC said.

The five account for 15 percent of all U.S. air travel, the agency said.

"The findings in today's report further confirm that ventilated smoking rooms and designated smoking areas are not effective," said Dr. Tim McAfee, director of the CDC Office on Smoking and Health. "Prohibiting smoking in all indoor areas is the only effective way to fully eliminate exposure to secondhand smoke."

Secondhand smoke causes heart disease and lung cancer in non-smoking adults, and even brief exposure to secondhand smoke can cause a heart attack, the CDC said.

The CDC tests, conducted between October 19 and November 1, measured markers for secondhand smoke. Pollution levels found slightly more than 3 feet (1 meter) outside the smoking rooms were five times higher than in four major smoke-free airports used for comparison, the CDC said.

"Airport smoking areas and the areas around them are not healthy - for workers or travelers, particularly children," Brian King, a CDC epidemiologist and co-author of the report, said in a statement.

(Editing by Colleen Jenkins and Cynthia Johnston)

FILED UNDER:
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

  • Most Popular
  • Most Shared

ALLERGY WORRIES

Reuters Showcase

A Little Help

A Little Help

Researchers "buzz" the brain to speed up learning.  Video 

Disease Outbreak

Disease Outbreak

WHO says West African Ebola outbreak to last 2-4 months.  Full Article 

Healthy Food

Healthy Food

For teen girls, fruits and veggies linked to lower risk of breast condition.  Full Article 

Milk Effect

Milk Effect

Drinking milk may slow women's knee arthritis.  Full Article 

Rising Obesity

Rising Obesity

U.S. childhood obesity rates have increased since 1999: study.  Full Article 

Quality Check

Quality Check

Just because it's sweet and sticky doesn't mean it's 'honey': FDA.  Full Article 

Reuters India Mobile

Reuters India Mobile

Get the latest news on the go. Visit Reuters India on your mobile device.   Full Coverage