Clinton to resume duties Monday following treatment for clot

WASHINGTON Mon Jan 7, 2013 9:50am IST

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton leaves New York Presbyterian Hospital with husband, Bill (top R), and daughter, Chelsea (R), in New York, January 2, 2013. REUTERS/Joshua Lott

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton leaves New York Presbyterian Hospital with husband, Bill (top R), and daughter, Chelsea (R), in New York, January 2, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Joshua Lott

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will resume her official duties on Monday, five days after being released from a hospital for treatment of a blood clot, the State Department said on Sunday.

Clinton, 65, will sit down with assistant secretaries of state for a closed-door meeting on Monday at 9:15 a.m. (1415 GMT) at the start of a week-long schedule containing nearly a dozen meetings, including three at the White House.

The secretary was released from New York Presbyterian Hospital last Wednesday, after a stay of several days during which she was given blood thinners to treat the clot in a vein behind her right ear. She has been resting at home in New York since then.

Clinton has suffered a series of ailments over the last month, including a stomach virus and a concussion.

Her doctors have said they expect her to make a full recovery.

The State Department said Clinton has been keeping up with her work by talking to her staff and receiving memos.

Her first White House meeting this week will take place on Tuesday and include Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and national security adviser Tom Donilon, the State Department said.

She is also scheduled to meet with the ambassadors of Ireland and South Africa on Tuesday, and with Afghan President Hamid Karzai later in the week.

Clinton is expected to step down in the next few weeks. President Barack Obama has chosen Senator John Kerry, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, to succeed her.

(Reporting by David Morgan; editing by Philip Barbara)

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