NSA passes unsifted intelligence to Israel - British paper

LONDON Thu Sep 12, 2013 3:57pm IST

The letters ''NSA'' for National Security Agency and a mask of U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden are taped on a fence of the ''Dagger Complex'', which is used by U.S. Army intelligence services, during a demonstration against the NSA and in support of Snowden in Griesheim, 20km (12.4 miles) south of Frankfurt, July 20, 2013. REUTERS/ Kai Pfaffenbach/Files

The letters ''NSA'' for National Security Agency and a mask of U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden are taped on a fence of the ''Dagger Complex'', which is used by U.S. Army intelligence services, during a demonstration against the NSA and in support of Snowden in Griesheim, 20km (12.4 miles) south of Frankfurt, July 20, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/ Kai Pfaffenbach/Files

Related Topics

LONDON (Reuters) - The U.S. National Security Agency routinely passes raw intelligence to Israel without first removing details about U.S. citizens, Britain's Guardian newspaper said on Thursday, citing documents obtained by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

Under a memorandum agreed in principle in March 2009, the NSA shares information with Israel that could include details of intercepted phone calls and emails from U.S. citizens with no legally binding restraint on the use of the data by the Israelis, the paper reported.

It said providing raw data to a foreign country contrasted with assurances given by U.S. President Barack Obama that the privacy of ordinary citizens would be protected.

The five-page memorandum stressed that the rights of Americans to privacy should be respected, but still allowed Israel to receive raw "Sigint", signal intelligence, which had not gone through a "minimisation" process to safeguard privacy.

"Raw Sigint includes, but is not limited to, unevaluated and unminimised transcripts, gists, facsimiles, telex, voice and Digital Network Intelligence metadata and content," the memorandum says, according to the Guardian.

The agreement, which allows Israel to retain the data containing the identities of U.S. citizens for up to a year, stated such material would not be filtered in advance by the NSA, the Guardian said.

While the Israelis agreed not to deliberately target Americans identified, there was no legal means to enforce this.

In a statement in response to the article, the NSA did not deny personal details of U.S. citizens was included in data passed on to Israel but said the practice complied with rules governing privacy, the Guardian said.

"Whenever we share intelligence information, we comply with all applicable rules, including the rules to protect U.S. personal information," the NSA statement said.

The memorandum is the latest in a series of disclosures by Snowden into NSA intelligence-gathering and surveillance-sharing methods which have angered Washington but also led to criticism of its security activities.

Previous documents released by Snowden indicated the email and phone data of Americans is being routinely monitored on a vast scale, with the cooperation of major U.S technology firms.

Snowden, sought by U.S. authorities for leaking classified information, is currently living in Russia. (Reporting by Michael Holden; editing by Ralph Boulton)

FILED UNDER:
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

  • Most Popular
  • Most Shared

SpaceShipTwo Crash

Reuters Showcase

Hack Attack

Hack Attack

J.P. Morgan found hackers through breach of corporate event website - WSJ.  Full Article 

Fighting Back

Fighting Back

Samsung Elec seeks China comeback with first metallic smartphones.  Full Article 

Cook Comes Out

Cook Comes Out

Apple's Cook: "I'm proud to be gay".  Full Article 

Glowing Flower

Glowing Flower

Video: Genetically altered glowing flower on display in Tokyo.  Video 

Cloud Solutions

Cloud Solutions

Tencent teams up with IBM to offer business software over the cloud.  Full Article 

Reuters India Mobile

Reuters India Mobile

Get the latest news on the go. Visit Reuters India on your mobile device.  Full Coverage