Ex-Murdoch editor says he played no part in murdered girl phone hacking

LONDON Tue Apr 15, 2014 4:44pm IST

Former Editor of the News of the World newspaper Andy Coulson arrives at the Old Bailey in central London April 15, 2014. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Former Editor of the News of the World newspaper Andy Coulson arrives at the Old Bailey in central London April 15, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Toby Melville

Related Topics

Stocks

   

LONDON (Reuters) - Andy Coulson, a former Rupert Murdoch editor, said on Tuesday he had played no part in the hacking of the mobile phone messages of murdered British teenager Milly Dowler, the revelation that led to the closure of the News of the World tabloid.

Coulson, British Prime Minister David Cameron's one-time media chief, told the Old Bailey trial he had never engaged in illegal hacking activity, nor known about attempts to tap in to Dowler's messages.

Dowler, 13, vanished from her home in March 2002 and her body was discovered some six months later.

The revelation in July 2011 that her phone had been hacked while she was still missing, giving her parents false hope that she was still alive, sparked public anger and a sequence of events leading to Murdoch closing the 168-year-old News of the World, Coulson's arrest and Cameron ordering a public inquiry into press ethics.

In the witness box for the second day in the 5-1/2 month trial, Coulson was asked by his lawyer Timothy Langdale whether he had ever been "party to or in agreement with phone hacking at the News of the World?"

"No I was not," he answered.

"Were you aware of any activity by the News of the World in relation to the hacking of Milly Dowler's voicemail messages?"

"No, I was not," he replied again.

Coulson is accused of conspiracy to illegally intercept voicemails on mobile phones and authorising illegal payments to public officials. He denies the charges.

Asked what he would have thought then about the process of accessing voicemails to generate stories, Coulson said he would have thought it was intrusive, a breach of privacy and lazy journalism.

(Reporting by Kate Holton and Michael Holden; editing by Stephen Addison)

FILED UNDER:
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

  • Most Popular
  • Most Shared

TECH SHOWCASE

Right to be Forgotten

Right to be Forgotten

Google under fire from regulators over response to EU privacy ruling.  Full Article 

Record Smartphone Sales

Record Sales

LG Electronics flags further mobile improvement after Q2 profit jump.  Full Article 

Smartwatch

Smartwatch

Swatch Group denies working with Apple on smartwatch.  Full Article 

Strong Results

Strong Results

Nokia's fortunes brighten on heavy network spending.  Full Article 

Battle of Giants

Battle of Giants

In China, Apple's focus pays off while Samsung feels squeeze.  Full Article 

Anonymity Services

Anonymity Services

Flaws could expose users of privacy-protecting software, researchers say.  Full Article 

Biggest Chipmaker

Biggest Chipmaker

China regulator determines Qualcomm has monopoly - state-run newspaper.  Full Article 

Reuters India Mobile

Reuters India Mobile

Get the latest news on the go. Visit Reuters India on your mobile device.  Full Coverage