July 10, 2017 / 11:27 AM / a month ago

Case of critically-ill baby back in court after Pope, Trump support

LONDON, July 10 (Reuters) - The mother of a critically ill baby expressed hope on Monday that a court would allow her son to travel from Britain to the United States for treatment after his case was given prominence by President Donald Trump and the Pope.

Connie Yates, whose 11-month-old son Charlie Gard suffers from a form of mitochondrial disease, a rare genetic condition that causes progressive muscle weakness and brain damage, wants him to be sent to the United States for experimental therapy.

After losing an earlier ruling, her son's case will return to the High Court on Monday, which Yates said was thanks to the high-profile support of Trump and the Pope.

Asked about the impact of their support , Yates said: "It's saved his life so far."

"It turned it into an international issue, a lot of people are outraged by what's going on. You know we've got new evidence now so I hope that the judge changes his mind," Yates told BBC radio.

Yates and her husband, Chris Gard, lost a legal battle to take their son to the United States for the experimental therapy at the end of last month when the European Court of Human Rights upheld the British court's decision that the trip would cause him unnecessary suffering.

It ruled the children's hospital could turn off his life support.

On Friday, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, where Charlie is being cared for, said it wanted the court to hear new evidence relating to the case, "in light of fresh evidence concerning potential treatment."

Charlie's parents want their son to be allowed to try a new treatment called nucleoside therapy which they believe has helped others with similar problems.

"There's 18 children currently on the medication, they all have mitochondrial syndrome as well as Charlie. Theirs is caused by a slightly different gene. They're all getting stronger," Yates said.

While fresh evidence was due to be heard on Monday a decision is not expected until Thursday.

When asked what they will do if the court rules in their favour Yates said they would "get on an air-ambulance and go to the hospital that want to try and save his life."

Reporting by Sarah Mills; Editing by Richard Balmforth

0 : 0
  • narrow-browser-and-phone
  • medium-browser-and-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser
  • wide-browser-and-larger
  • medium-browser-and-landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser-and-larger
  • above-phone
  • portrait-tablet-and-above
  • above-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet-and-above
  • landscape-tablet-and-medium-wide-browser
  • portrait-tablet-and-below
  • landscape-tablet-and-below