May 19, 2017 / 11:13 AM / 2 months ago

Factbox - Tax incentives lure movie production around the world

2 Min Read

A representative of Poland, one of dozens of officials promoting their production tax incentives at a conference hosted by the Association of Film Commissioners International, speaks with a guest in Burbank, California, U.S. on April 7, 2017.Lisa Richwine

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Hollywood filmmakers moved around the world to produce this summer's blockbuster films, taking advantage of tax incentives that producers say makes it more economical to shoot outside of California.

Below is a list of filming locations for most of the summer's big-budget action movies, and the tax credits and rebates offered in those places.

Tax credits reduce a producer's tax liability in the state or country.

Transferable tax credits allow producers to sell unused portions to other taxpayers.

With refundable tax credits, the state pays cash to the producer for the portion of the credit that exceeds the tax liability.

In most cases, neither the film studios nor the locales disclosed the total amounts awarded for each movie.

Britain

"Wonder Woman"

"The Mummy"

"King Arthur: Legend of the Sword"

Incentive

Up to 25 percent cash rebate

u.s. State of Georgia

"Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2"

"Spider-Man: Homecoming"

Incentives

20 to 30 percent transferable tax credit

France

"Dunkirk"

Incentives

30 percent rebate capped at 30 million euros per project

The movie also received incentives for filming partially in Britain and the Netherlands.

Australia

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales"

"Alien: Covenant"

Incentives

"Pirates of the Caribbean" received a $21.6 million (Australian dollars) grant from the Australian government and an undisclosed incentive from Queensland

"Alien" received a portion of $47.3 million (Australian dollars) that the Australian government approved for two films, plus an undisclosed incentive from the state of New South Wales

Michigan

"Transformers: The Last Knight"

Incentives

Michigan ended its film subsidies in 2015 but agreed to pay up to $21 million for the "Transformers" movie to honor previous commitments.

Sources: Government film office officials and websites, sources close to the productions

Reporting by Lisa Richwine; Editing by Jonathan Oatis

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