Reuters logo
Qatar still seeks gasoil from GCC even as countries sever ties - traders
June 5, 2017 / 7:56 AM / 4 months ago

Qatar still seeks gasoil from GCC even as countries sever ties - traders

* Tender requires supply from GCC country

* Tender yet to be cancelled or re-issued

* Jet fuel exports likely to remain steady - traders

By Jessica Jaganathan

SINGAPORE, June 5 (Reuters) - Qatar Petroleum is still seeking gasoil from countries in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) even as some members of the group have severed ties with the country, said two trading sources on Monday.

The state-run company was looking for up to two gasoil cargoes a month for delivery over July to September in a tender that closes on Monday. Qatar Petroleum has not amended the bid, the sources said.

One of the requirements of the tender was that the cargoes originate from the GCC, whose member countries include the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and Kuwait and Yemen.

“They have not amended the tender from what I can see so far, but perhaps it’s still early hours,” said one of the sources, a Gulf-based trader said.

Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the UAE and Bahrain cut their ties with Qatar on Monday, accusing it of supporting terrorism, opening up the worst rift in years among some of the most powerful states in the Arab world.

The coordinated move dramatically escalates a dispute over Qatar’s support of the Muslim Brotherhood, the world’s oldest Islamist movement, and adds accusations that Doha even backs the agenda of regional arch-rival Iran.

Qatar Petroleum is not typically a buyer of gasoil but has been importing the fuel due to some supply issues in its domestic market, the traders said.

While the traders expect the tender to likely be re-issued or cancelled given the latest development, they do not expect a major impact on flows of the fuel.

“Qatar is a regular exporter of gas-to-liquid (GTL) diesel from the Pearl GTL (plant) which (Royal Dutch Shell) partners, so Shell can easily source the gasoil from elsewhere if needed,” said the second source, a Singapore-based trader.

Qatar Petroleum’s exports of jet fuel are unlikely to be disrupted as the aviation fuel is usually shipped to international markets, said the first source.

“I think the biggest impact will be on LNG, which stays in the region,” the source added.

Qatar meets almost one-third of global LNG demand and Egypt, which struggles to meet its electricity needs, has imported an average 857,000 cubic metres per month of LNG from Qatar since January 2016, according to shipping data in Thomson Reuters Eikon.

The fuel is used largely for power generation. (Reporting by Jessica Jaganathan; Editing by Christian Schmollinger)

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
0 : 0
  • narrow-browser-and-phone
  • medium-browser-and-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser
  • wide-browser-and-larger
  • medium-browser-and-landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser-and-larger
  • above-phone
  • portrait-tablet-and-above
  • above-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet-and-above
  • landscape-tablet-and-medium-wide-browser
  • portrait-tablet-and-below
  • landscape-tablet-and-below