Reuters

Northern Ireland's peace walls

Share Slideshow

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities in Belfast wraps around houses in Cluan Place, east Belfast October 27, 2012. The first barriers were built in 1969, following the outbreak of the Northern Ireland riots known as "The Troubles." They were built as temporary structures meant to last only six months, but they have multiplied over the years, from 18 in the early 1990s to 40 today; in total...more

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities in Belfast wraps around houses in Cluan Place, east Belfast October 27, 2012. The first barriers were built in 1969, following the outbreak of the Northern Ireland riots known as "The Troubles." They were built as temporary structures meant to last only six months, but they have multiplied over the years, from 18 in the early 1990s to 40 today; in total they stretch over 13 miles (21 km), with most located in Belfast. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
1 / 29

William Boyd, retired, poses for a picture at the side of his house in Cluan Place in east Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

William Boyd, retired, poses for a picture at the side of his house in Cluan Place in east Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
2 / 29

William Boyd, retired, looks out of the window of his house in Cluan Place in east Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

William Boyd, retired, looks out of the window of his house in Cluan Place in east Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
3 / 29

William Boyd, retired, looks at the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities running along the bottom of his garden in Cluan Place, east Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

William Boyd, retired, looks at the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities running along the bottom of his garden in Cluan Place, east Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
4 / 29

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities wraps around houses in Clandeboye Gardens, east Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities wraps around houses in Clandeboye Gardens, east Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
5 / 29

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along Cupar Way, west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along Cupar Way, west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
6 / 29

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along Alliance Avenue, north Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along Alliance Avenue, north Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
7 / 29

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities wraps around houses in Cluan Place, east Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities wraps around houses in Cluan Place, east Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
8 / 29
Advertisement
Skip ad
3

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of houses in Bombay Street, west Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of houses in Bombay Street, west Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
9 / 29

Jean McAnoy, a care worker, poses for a picture in the back garden of her home in Bombay Street, west Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Jean McAnoy, a care worker, poses for a picture in the back garden of her home in Bombay Street, west Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
10 / 29

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of a house in Bombay Street, west Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of a house in Bombay Street, west Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
11 / 29

Jean McAnoy, a care worker, closes the gate in the back garden of her home in Bombay Street, west Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Jean McAnoy, a care worker, closes the gate in the back garden of her home in Bombay Street, west Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
12 / 29

A statue of an angel rests on the wall of a garden in Bombay Street which backs onto the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities in west Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A statue of an angel rests on the wall of a garden in Bombay Street which backs onto the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities in west Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
13 / 29

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of houses in Forth Parade, west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of houses in Forth Parade, west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
14 / 29

A child's bicycle lies abandoned on the street as a section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities wraps around houses in Cluan Place, east Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A child's bicycle lies abandoned on the street as a section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities wraps around houses in Cluan Place, east Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
15 / 29

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of houses in Glenbryn Park, west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of houses in Glenbryn Park, west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
16 / 29
Advertisement
Skip ad
3

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs alongside houses in Clandeboye Gardens, east Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs alongside houses in Clandeboye Gardens, east Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
17 / 29

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of houses in Ardoyne Road, north Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of houses in Ardoyne Road, north Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
18 / 29

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along Cupar Way, west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along Cupar Way, west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
19 / 29

Stephen McGarry, hangs out the laundry in the back garden of his home on Clonard Street in west Belfast October 17, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Stephen McGarry, hangs out the laundry in the back garden of his home on Clonard Street in west Belfast October 17, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
20 / 29

A metal grill covering the window of Stephen McGarry's house on Clonard Street in west Belfast provides protection from missiles thrown across the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities at the bottom of his garden October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A metal grill covering the window of Stephen McGarry's house on Clonard Street in west Belfast provides protection from missiles thrown across the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities at the bottom of his garden October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
21 / 29

Stephen McGarry poses for a picture in the back garden of his home on Clonard Street in west Belfast October 17, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Stephen McGarry poses for a picture in the back garden of his home on Clonard Street in west Belfast October 17, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
22 / 29

A large locked metal gate forms part of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs across Workman Avenue in west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A large locked metal gate forms part of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs across Workman Avenue in west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
23 / 29

Paula McDonald, a child minder, plays with her dog in the back garden of her home in Finn Square, Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Paula McDonald, a child minder, plays with her dog in the back garden of her home in Finn Square, Belfast October 18, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
24 / 29
Advertisement
Skip ad
3

Seen through protective metal screens covering a bedroom window a section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of houses in Finn Square, west Belfast October 18, 2012.REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Seen through protective metal screens covering a bedroom window a section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along the back of houses in Finn Square, west Belfast October 18, 2012.REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
25 / 29

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs through the middle of Alexandra Park in north Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs through the middle of Alexandra Park in north Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
26 / 29

Sonya Foster, a care worker, poses for a picture in the back garden of her home in the Glenbryn area of Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Sonya Foster, a care worker, poses for a picture in the back garden of her home in the Glenbryn area of Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
27 / 29

Children play on waste ground beside a section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities along Glenbryn Park, north Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Children play on waste ground beside a section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities along Glenbryn Park, north Belfast October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
28 / 29

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along Cupar Way, west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

A section of the peace wall that divides Catholic and Protestant communities runs along Cupar Way, west Belfast November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Close
29 / 29

All Collections

Gadhimai festival in Nepal

4:40am IST

All Collections

Photos of the week

2:42am IST

All Collections

Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade

12:58am IST

All Collections

Editor's choice

Thursday, November 27, 2014

All Collections

SAARC summit in Nepal

Thursday, November 27, 2014

All Collections

Phillip Hughes: 1988-2014

Thursday, November 27, 2014

All Collections

Editor's choice

Thursday, November 27, 2014

All Collections

Miss Wheelchair India

Thursday, November 27, 2014