Reuters

Fly farm

Share Slideshow

Larvae await harvesting at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. Work on the world's largest fly farm has begun in South Africa after the European firm behind the project won much-needed funding from investors, propelling the use of insects as livestock feed beyond academic theory to a commercial venture. The farm will house 8.5 billion of flies that will produce tons of protein-rich larvae as they feed on...more

Larvae await harvesting at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. Work on the world's largest fly farm has begun in South Africa after the European firm behind the project won much-needed funding from investors, propelling the use of insects as livestock feed beyond academic theory to a commercial venture. The farm will house 8.5 billion of flies that will produce tons of protein-rich larvae as they feed on organic waste. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
Close
1 / 10

Flies rest on a wall at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Flies rest on a wall at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
Close
2 / 10

A worker holds up fly larvae waiting to be harvested at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

A worker holds up fly larvae waiting to be harvested at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
Close
3 / 10

Rotting vegetable matter waits to be recycled to feed larvae at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Rotting vegetable matter waits to be recycled to feed larvae at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
Close
4 / 10

Workers push a container of recycled rotting vegetable matter used to feed larvae at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Workers push a container of recycled rotting vegetable matter used to feed larvae at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
Close
5 / 10

Fly larvae await harvesting at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Fly larvae await harvesting at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
Close
6 / 10

A visitor stands behind an encasement of flies at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

A visitor stands behind an encasement of flies at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
Close
7 / 10

A worker empties a box of rotting vegetable matter into a crusher to feed larvae at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

A worker empties a box of rotting vegetable matter into a crusher to feed larvae at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
Close
8 / 10
Advertisement
Skip ad
3

Larvae await harvesting at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Larvae await harvesting at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
Close
9 / 10

Flies rest on a wall at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Flies rest on a wall at the AgriProtein project farm near Cape Town, July 10, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
Close
10 / 10
View more slideshows

All Collections

Pictures of the year: Sports

5:50am IST

All Collections

In the heart of Ebola

5:20am IST

All Collections

Editor's choice

4:50am IST

All Collections

Inside the Peshawar school

4:42am IST

All Collections

Pictures of the year: Rise of ISIS

4:29am IST

All Collections

Inside North Korea

1:52am IST

All Collections

Behind the wheel in Kabul

12:35am IST

All Collections

U.S. and Cuba restore ties

Thursday, December 18, 2014