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Pictures | Thu Sep 20, 2012 | 11:30am IST

Anti-Islam film protests in India

<p>Kashmiri Muslim protesters burn an effigy symbolizing America during a protest strike in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli </p>

Kashmiri Muslim protesters burn an effigy symbolizing America during a protest strike in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

Kashmiri Muslim protesters burn an effigy symbolizing America during a protest strike in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>A masked youth attends a strike in Srinagar, September 18, 2012.  REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli </p>

A masked youth attends a strike in Srinagar, September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

A masked youth attends a strike in Srinagar, September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>Policemen stand guard at a deserted road during a strike in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli </p>

Policemen stand guard at a deserted road during a strike in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

Policemen stand guard at a deserted road during a strike in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>A Kashmiri Muslim protester shouts slogans in front a burning American and Israeli flag, that have been joint together, during a strike in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli </p>

A Kashmiri Muslim protester shouts slogans in front a burning American and Israeli flag, that have been joint together, during a strike in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

A Kashmiri Muslim protester shouts slogans in front a burning American and Israeli flag, that have been joint together, during a strike in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>Kashmiri Muslim protesters burn an effigy representing America during a demonstration in Srinagar September 18, 2012.  REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli</p>

Kashmiri Muslim protesters burn an effigy representing America during a demonstration in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

Kashmiri Muslim protesters burn an effigy representing America during a demonstration in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>A Muslim man burns a U.S. flag during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, outside a mosque in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder</p>

A Muslim man burns a U.S. flag during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, outside a mosque in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder

A Muslim man burns a U.S. flag during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, outside a mosque in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder

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<p>Muslims walk over U.S. flags being spread at the entrance of a mosque during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad, September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder</p>

Muslims walk over U.S. flags being spread at the entrance of a mosque during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad, September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder

Muslims walk over U.S. flags being spread at the entrance of a mosque during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad, September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder

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<p>Muslims burn U.S. flags during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, outside a mosque in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder</p>

Muslims burn U.S. flags during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, outside a mosque in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder

Muslims burn U.S. flags during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, outside a mosque in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder

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<p>A Kashmiri masked protester holds a burning U.S. flag during a protest against a film the demonstrators consider to be blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 14, 2012.  REUTERS/Stringer</p>

A Kashmiri masked protester holds a burning U.S. flag during a protest against a film the demonstrators consider to be blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

A Kashmiri masked protester holds a burning U.S. flag during a protest against a film the demonstrators consider to be blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

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<p>A Kashmiri masked protester holds a burning Israeli flag during a protest against a film produced in the U.S. the demonstrators consider to be blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer</p>

A Kashmiri masked protester holds a burning Israeli flag during a protest against a film produced in the U.S. the demonstrators consider to be blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

A Kashmiri masked protester holds a burning Israeli flag during a protest against a film produced in the U.S. the demonstrators consider to be blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

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<p>Police officers detain a protester outside the U.S. Consulate-general during a protest by Muslims against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Babu</p>

Police officers detain a protester outside the U.S. Consulate-general during a protest by Muslims against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

Police officers detain a protester outside the U.S. Consulate-general during a protest by Muslims against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

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<p>Muslim protesters burn a U.S. flag during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, outside the U.S. Consulate-general in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Babu</p>

Muslim protesters burn a U.S. flag during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, outside the U.S. Consulate-general in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

Muslim protesters burn a U.S. flag during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, outside the U.S. Consulate-general in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

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<p>Muslim protesters try to break glass windows of a part of the U.S. Consulate-general during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Babu</p>

Muslim protesters try to break glass windows of a part of the U.S. Consulate-general during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

Muslim protesters try to break glass windows of a part of the U.S. Consulate-general during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 14, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

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<p>Kashmiri students shout anti-U.S. slogans during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli</p>

Kashmiri students shout anti-U.S. slogans during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

Kashmiri students shout anti-U.S. slogans during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>A Kashmiri student holds up a sign during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli</p>

A Kashmiri student holds up a sign during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

A Kashmiri student holds up a sign during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>Muslim protesters hold a caricature of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near the U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Babu</p>

Muslim protesters hold a caricature of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near the U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Babu more

Muslim protesters hold a caricature of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near the U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

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<p>Muslim protesters shout anti-U.S. slogans and hold footwear and brooms during a protest against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near the U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Babu</p>

Muslim protesters shout anti-U.S. slogans and hold footwear and brooms during a protest against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near the U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 15, 2012....more

Muslim protesters shout anti-U.S. slogans and hold footwear and brooms during a protest against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near the U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

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<p>A Muslim protester hits a caricature of Florida pastor Terry Jones with her footwear during a protest, against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near the U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Babu</p>

A Muslim protester hits a caricature of Florida pastor Terry Jones with her footwear during a protest, against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near the U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 15,...more

A Muslim protester hits a caricature of Florida pastor Terry Jones with her footwear during a protest, against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near the U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

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<p>Muslim protesters hit caricatures of U.S. President Barack Obama and Florida pastor Terry Jones with brooms during a protest, against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Babu</p>

Muslim protesters hit caricatures of U.S. President Barack Obama and Florida pastor Terry Jones with brooms during a protest, against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of...more

Muslim protesters hit caricatures of U.S. President Barack Obama and Florida pastor Terry Jones with brooms during a protest, against a U.S.-made film they consider blasphemous to Islam, near U.S. consulate-general, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

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<p>A member from the Muslim Khawateen Markaz, a Kashmiri women's separatist group, holds a placard during a protest against the "Innocence of Muslims", a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 17, 2012.  REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli</p>

A member from the Muslim Khawateen Markaz, a Kashmiri women's separatist group, holds a placard during a protest against the "Innocence of Muslims", a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli more

A member from the Muslim Khawateen Markaz, a Kashmiri women's separatist group, holds a placard during a protest against the "Innocence of Muslims", a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>Yasmeen Raja (C), the leader of Muslim Khawateen Markaz, a Kashmiri women's separatist group, leads a protest against the "Innocence of Muslims", a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli</p>

Yasmeen Raja (C), the leader of Muslim Khawateen Markaz, a Kashmiri women's separatist group, leads a protest against the "Innocence of Muslims", a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

Yasmeen Raja (C), the leader of Muslim Khawateen Markaz, a Kashmiri women's separatist group, leads a protest against the "Innocence of Muslims", a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>Kashmiri students shout anti-U.S. slogans during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail</p>

Kashmiri students shout anti-U.S. slogans during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail

Kashmiri students shout anti-U.S. slogans during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail

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<p>Kashmiri medical students hold placards in front their female classmates during a protest against a U.S. film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli </p>

Kashmiri medical students hold placards in front their female classmates during a protest against a U.S. film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

Kashmiri medical students hold placards in front their female classmates during a protest against a U.S. film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>A Kashmiri medical student shouts anti-U.S. slogans as other students hold placards during a protest against a U.S. film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli </p>

A Kashmiri medical student shouts anti-U.S. slogans as other students hold placards during a protest against a U.S. film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

A Kashmiri medical student shouts anti-U.S. slogans as other students hold placards during a protest against a U.S. film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>Kashmiri medical students hold placards and shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest against a U.S. film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli </p>

Kashmiri medical students hold placards and shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest against a U.S. film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

Kashmiri medical students hold placards and shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest against a U.S. film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

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<p>Muslim demonstrators burn U.S. flags during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Chennai September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Babu</p>

Muslim demonstrators burn U.S. flags during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Chennai September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

Muslim demonstrators burn U.S. flags during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Chennai September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

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<p>Muslim demonstrators hold a defaced poster of Florida pastor Terry Jones as they shout anti-U.S. slogans during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Chennai September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Babu </p>

Muslim demonstrators hold a defaced poster of Florida pastor Terry Jones as they shout anti-U.S. slogans during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Chennai September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

Muslim demonstrators hold a defaced poster of Florida pastor Terry Jones as they shout anti-U.S. slogans during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Chennai September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

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<p>Muslim demonstrators hold a defaced poster of U.S. President Barack Obama during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Babu </p>

Muslim demonstrators hold a defaced poster of U.S. President Barack Obama during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

Muslim demonstrators hold a defaced poster of U.S. President Barack Obama during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in the southern Indian city of Chennai September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Babu

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<p>A firefighter extinguishes a vehicle set on fire by Kashmiri demonstrators during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail </p>

A firefighter extinguishes a vehicle set on fire by Kashmiri demonstrators during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail

A firefighter extinguishes a vehicle set on fire by Kashmiri demonstrators during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail

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<p>A policeman (L) watches as a a man runs past a burning vehicle which was set on fire by Kashmiri demonstrators during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail</p>

A policeman (L) watches as a a man runs past a burning vehicle which was set on fire by Kashmiri demonstrators during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail more

A policeman (L) watches as a a man runs past a burning vehicle which was set on fire by Kashmiri demonstrators during an anti-U.S. protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail

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<p>Kashmiri demonstrators shout slogans during an anti-U.S. protest against an anti-Islam film, in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail </p>

Kashmiri demonstrators shout slogans during an anti-U.S. protest against an anti-Islam film, in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail

Kashmiri demonstrators shout slogans during an anti-U.S. protest against an anti-Islam film, in Srinagar September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Ismail

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<p>Muslim demonstrators shout slogans and burn an effigy of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Kolkata September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri </p>

Muslim demonstrators shout slogans and burn an effigy of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Kolkata September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Muslim demonstrators shout slogans and burn an effigy of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, in Kolkata September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

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