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Pictures | Thu Dec 13, 2012 | 11:35pm IST

Handmade eyeballs

<p>A tray of example glass eyes are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost about 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

A tray of example glass eyes are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a...more

A tray of example glass eyes are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost about 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner looks for examples of glass eyes for patient Helmut Sechser (not pictured) in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner looks for examples of glass eyes for patient Helmut Sechser (not pictured) in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner looks for examples of glass eyes for patient Helmut Sechser (not pictured) in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>A tray of glass eyes with different coloured irises are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

A tray of glass eyes with different coloured irises are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

A tray of glass eyes with different coloured irises are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner compares a glass eye example with the eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner compares a glass eye example with the eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner compares a glass eye example with the eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner compares two different former glass eyes of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner compares two different former glass eyes of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner compares two different former glass eyes of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Patient Helmut Sechser looks in a mirror without his glass eye before being fitted for a new one at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Patient Helmut Sechser looks in a mirror without his glass eye before being fitted for a new one at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Patient Helmut Sechser looks in a mirror without his glass eye before being fitted for a new one at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (L) puts in the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (L) puts in the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (L) puts in the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Patient Helmut Sechser puts in his old glass eye while he waits for a new one to be made at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Patient Helmut Sechser puts in his old glass eye while he waits for a new one to be made at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Patient Helmut Sechser puts in his old glass eye while he waits for a new one to be made at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner looks for examples of glass eyes for patient Helmut Sechser (L) in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner looks for examples of glass eyes for patient Helmut Sechser (L) in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner looks for examples of glass eyes for patient Helmut Sechser (L) in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Patient Helmut Sechser cleans his old glass eye with water before being fitted for a new one at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Patient Helmut Sechser cleans his old glass eye with water before being fitted for a new one at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Patient Helmut Sechser cleans his old glass eye with water before being fitted for a new one at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Patient Helmut Sechser holds his old glass eye before being fitted for a new one at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Patient Helmut Sechser holds his old glass eye before being fitted for a new one at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Patient Helmut Sechser holds his old glass eye before being fitted for a new one at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (L) removes the glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (L) removes the glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (L) removes the glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>A tray of glass eyes with different coloured irises are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

A tray of glass eyes with different coloured irises are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

A tray of glass eyes with different coloured irises are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>The old glass eyes of patient Helmut Sechser sits in a small box at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012.    REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

The old glass eyes of patient Helmut Sechser sits in a small box at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

The old glass eyes of patient Helmut Sechser sits in a small box at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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<p>Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (seen in mirror) looks at the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Michaela Rehle</p>

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (seen in mirror) looks at the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (seen in mirror) looks at the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

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