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Pictures | Thu Mar 15, 2012 | 3:35am IST

Space odysseys

<p>The Aurora Australis is seen in this handout picture taken by Dutch astronaut Andre Kuipers on board the International Space Station between Antarctica and Australia March 10, 2012.  REUTERS/Andre Kuipers/ESA/NASA/Handout </p>

The Aurora Australis is seen in this handout picture taken by Dutch astronaut Andre Kuipers on board the International Space Station between Antarctica and Australia March 10, 2012. REUTERS/Andre Kuipers/ESA/NASA/Handout

The Aurora Australis is seen in this handout picture taken by Dutch astronaut Andre Kuipers on board the International Space Station between Antarctica and Australia March 10, 2012. REUTERS/Andre Kuipers/ESA/NASA/Handout

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<p>Winners of the annual Red Bull Flugtag competition experience zero gravity conditions during a flight in a cosmonaut training plane above the Moscow region March 1, 2012. The flight was a prize awarded to winners of the August 2011 competition, where they designed, built and flew home-made aircraft.  REUTERS/Sergei Remezov </p>

Winners of the annual Red Bull Flugtag competition experience zero gravity conditions during a flight in a cosmonaut training plane above the Moscow region March 1, 2012. The flight was a prize awarded to winners of the August 2011 competition, where...more

Winners of the annual Red Bull Flugtag competition experience zero gravity conditions during a flight in a cosmonaut training plane above the Moscow region March 1, 2012. The flight was a prize awarded to winners of the August 2011 competition, where they designed, built and flew home-made aircraft. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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<p>This all-sky image shows the distribution of carbon monoxide (CO), a molecule used by astronomers to trace molecular clouds across the sky, as seen by Planck. Molecular clouds, the dense and compact regions throughout the Milky Way where gas and dust clump together, represent one of the sources of foreground emission seen by Planck. The vast majority of gas in these clouds consists of molecular hydrogen, and it is in these cold regions that stars are born. Since cold molecular hydrogen does not easily radiate, astronomers trace these cosmic cribs across the sky by targeting other molecules, which are present there in very low abundance but radiate quite efficiently. The most important of these tracers is CO, which emits a number of rotational emission lines in the frequency range probed by Planck's High Frequency Instrument. REUTERS/NASA/ESA/Planck Collaboration/Handout   </p>

This all-sky image shows the distribution of carbon monoxide (CO), a molecule used by astronomers to trace molecular clouds across the sky, as seen by Planck. Molecular clouds, the dense and compact regions throughout the Milky Way where gas and dust...more

This all-sky image shows the distribution of carbon monoxide (CO), a molecule used by astronomers to trace molecular clouds across the sky, as seen by Planck. Molecular clouds, the dense and compact regions throughout the Milky Way where gas and dust clump together, represent one of the sources of foreground emission seen by Planck. The vast majority of gas in these clouds consists of molecular hydrogen, and it is in these cold regions that stars are born. Since cold molecular hydrogen does not easily radiate, astronomers trace these cosmic cribs across the sky by targeting other molecules, which are present there in very low abundance but radiate quite efficiently. The most important of these tracers is CO, which emits a number of rotational emission lines in the frequency range probed by Planck's High Frequency Instrument. REUTERS/NASA/ESA/Planck Collaboration/Handout

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<p>Iranian Space Agency (ISA) personnel monitor signals of the Navid-1 satellite at the facility in Mahdasht, about 60 km (37 miles) west of Tehran, February 29, 2012. REUTERS/Raheb Homavandi  </p>

Iranian Space Agency (ISA) personnel monitor signals of the Navid-1 satellite at the facility in Mahdasht, about 60 km (37 miles) west of Tehran, February 29, 2012. REUTERS/Raheb Homavandi

Iranian Space Agency (ISA) personnel monitor signals of the Navid-1 satellite at the facility in Mahdasht, about 60 km (37 miles) west of Tehran, February 29, 2012. REUTERS/Raheb Homavandi

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<p>American astronaut Christopher Cassidy (R) stands with Russian cosmonauts Pavel Vinogradov (C) and Alexandr Misurkin during a survival training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow January 31, 2012. The three man team will launch a mission to the International Space Station in 2013.  REUTERS/Sergei Remezov</p>

American astronaut Christopher Cassidy (R) stands with Russian cosmonauts Pavel Vinogradov (C) and Alexandr Misurkin during a survival training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow January 31, 2012. The three man team...more

American astronaut Christopher Cassidy (R) stands with Russian cosmonauts Pavel Vinogradov (C) and Alexandr Misurkin during a survival training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow January 31, 2012. The three man team will launch a mission to the International Space Station in 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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<p>Fast-moving protons from a solar energetic particle (SEP) event cause interference that looks like snow in these NASA handout images from the Solar Heliospheric Observatory taken on January 23, 2012. REUTERS/SOHO/ESA &amp; NASA/Handout  </p>

Fast-moving protons from a solar energetic particle (SEP) event cause interference that looks like snow in these NASA handout images from the Solar Heliospheric Observatory taken on January 23, 2012. REUTERS/SOHO/ESA & NASA/Handout

Fast-moving protons from a solar energetic particle (SEP) event cause interference that looks like snow in these NASA handout images from the Solar Heliospheric Observatory taken on January 23, 2012. REUTERS/SOHO/ESA & NASA/Handout

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<p>Saturn and its moon Dione appear in this December 12, 2011 handout image courtesy of NASA. The image was taken in visible green light at approximately 35,000 miles (57,000 kilometers) from Dione with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera.  REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/Handout </p>

Saturn and its moon Dione appear in this December 12, 2011 handout image courtesy of NASA. The image was taken in visible green light at approximately 35,000 miles (57,000 kilometers) from Dione with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera. ...more

Saturn and its moon Dione appear in this December 12, 2011 handout image courtesy of NASA. The image was taken in visible green light at approximately 35,000 miles (57,000 kilometers) from Dione with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/Handout

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<p>U.S. astronaut Sunita Williams gestures to Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide before a training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow February 28, 2012. Williams, together with Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko and Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, is scheduled to launch a mission to the International Space Station in summer 2012.  REUTERS/Sergei Remezov </p>

U.S. astronaut Sunita Williams gestures to Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide before a training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow February 28, 2012. Williams, together with Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko and...more

U.S. astronaut Sunita Williams gestures to Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide before a training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow February 28, 2012. Williams, together with Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko and Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, is scheduled to launch a mission to the International Space Station in summer 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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<p>A car's headlights illuminates the A9 dual carriageway approach to on a clear starry night near Inverness, Scotland, January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Russell Cheyne </p>

A car's headlights illuminates the A9 dual carriageway approach to on a clear starry night near Inverness, Scotland, January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Russell Cheyne

A car's headlights illuminates the A9 dual carriageway approach to on a clear starry night near Inverness, Scotland, January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Russell Cheyne

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<p>German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) and Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff listen to ESA astronaut Andre Kuipers during a live transmission to the International Space Station seen on a screen at the opening ceremony of the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 5, 2012. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer </p>

German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) and Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff listen to ESA astronaut Andre Kuipers during a live transmission to the International Space Station seen on a screen at the opening ceremony of the CeBIT computer fair in...more

German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) and Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff listen to ESA astronaut Andre Kuipers during a live transmission to the International Space Station seen on a screen at the opening ceremony of the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover March 5, 2012. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer

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<p>The sun erupts with one of the largest solar flares of this solar cycle in this multi-colored NASA handout photo taken on March 6, 2012. This flare was categorized as an X5.4, making it the second largest flare -- after an X6.9 on August 9, 2011 -- since the sun's activity segued into a period of relatively low activity called solar minimum in early 2007. The current increase in the number of X-class flares is part of the sun's normal 11-year solar cycle, during which activity on the sun ramps up to solar maximum, which is expected to peak in late 2013.  REUTERS/NASA/SD0/AIA/Handout </p>

The sun erupts with one of the largest solar flares of this solar cycle in this multi-colored NASA handout photo taken on March 6, 2012. This flare was categorized as an X5.4, making it the second largest flare -- after an X6.9 on August 9, 2011 --...more

The sun erupts with one of the largest solar flares of this solar cycle in this multi-colored NASA handout photo taken on March 6, 2012. This flare was categorized as an X5.4, making it the second largest flare -- after an X6.9 on August 9, 2011 -- since the sun's activity segued into a period of relatively low activity called solar minimum in early 2007. The current increase in the number of X-class flares is part of the sun's normal 11-year solar cycle, during which activity on the sun ramps up to solar maximum, which is expected to peak in late 2013. REUTERS/NASA/SD0/AIA/Handout

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<p>Nighttime view from the International Space Station shows the Atlantic coast of the United States in this NASA handout image dated February 6, 2012. Metropolitan areas from the Virginia/Maryland/Washington, D.C. area are visible in the image that spans almost to Rhode Island. Boston is just out of frame at right. Long Island and the New York City area are visible in the lower right quadrant. Philadelphia and Pittsburgh are near the center. Parts of two Russian vehicles parked at the orbital outpost are seen in left foreground. REUTERS/NASA/Handout  </p>

Nighttime view from the International Space Station shows the Atlantic coast of the United States in this NASA handout image dated February 6, 2012. Metropolitan areas from the Virginia/Maryland/Washington, D.C. area are visible in the image that...more

Nighttime view from the International Space Station shows the Atlantic coast of the United States in this NASA handout image dated February 6, 2012. Metropolitan areas from the Virginia/Maryland/Washington, D.C. area are visible in the image that spans almost to Rhode Island. Boston is just out of frame at right. Long Island and the New York City area are visible in the lower right quadrant. Philadelphia and Pittsburgh are near the center. Parts of two Russian vehicles parked at the orbital outpost are seen in left foreground. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

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<p>Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide takes part in a training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow February 15, 2012. Hoshide, together with Russian cosmonaut Yury Malenchenko and U.S. astronaut Sunita Williams, is scheduled to launch a mission to the International Space Station in June 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov </p>

Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide takes part in a training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow February 15, 2012. Hoshide, together with Russian cosmonaut Yury Malenchenko and U.S. astronaut Sunita Williams, is...more

Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide takes part in a training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow February 15, 2012. Hoshide, together with Russian cosmonaut Yury Malenchenko and U.S. astronaut Sunita Williams, is scheduled to launch a mission to the International Space Station in June 2012. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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<p>A new view of the Orion nebula highlights fledgling stars hidden in the gas and clouds, showing infrared observations taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the European Space Agency's Herschel mission in this photograph released by NASA February 29, 2012. A star forms as a clump of this gas and dust collapses, creating a warm glob of material fed by an encircling disk. These dusty envelopes glow brightest at longer wavelengths, appearing as red dots in this image. The Orion nebula is about 1,500 light-years away from Earth and cannot quite be seen with the naked eye. The colors in this image relate to the different wavelengths of light, and to the temperature of material, mostly dust, in this region of Orion. Data from Spitzer show warmer objects in blue, with progressively cooler dust appearing green and red in the Herschel datasets. The more evolved, hotter embryonic stars thus appear in blue. REUTERS/NASA/ESA/JPL-Caltech/IRAM/Handout </p>

A new view of the Orion nebula highlights fledgling stars hidden in the gas and clouds, showing infrared observations taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the European Space Agency's Herschel mission in this photograph released by NASA...more

A new view of the Orion nebula highlights fledgling stars hidden in the gas and clouds, showing infrared observations taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the European Space Agency's Herschel mission in this photograph released by NASA February 29, 2012. A star forms as a clump of this gas and dust collapses, creating a warm glob of material fed by an encircling disk. These dusty envelopes glow brightest at longer wavelengths, appearing as red dots in this image. The Orion nebula is about 1,500 light-years away from Earth and cannot quite be seen with the naked eye. The colors in this image relate to the different wavelengths of light, and to the temperature of material, mostly dust, in this region of Orion. Data from Spitzer show warmer objects in blue, with progressively cooler dust appearing green and red in the Herschel datasets. The more evolved, hotter embryonic stars thus appear in blue. REUTERS/NASA/ESA/JPL-Caltech/IRAM/Handout

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<p>Expedition 30 Russian Flight Engineer Anton Shkaplerov works to secure one of the two Strela cranes in view of Oleg Kononenko's helmet camera during their spacewalk outside the International Space Station in this image from NASA TV February 16, 2012. The spacewalkers will move one of the two Strela cranes from the Pirs Docking Compartment as they prepare for the replacement of Pirs with a new Russian laboratory and docking port.    REUTERS/NASA TV/Handout </p>

Expedition 30 Russian Flight Engineer Anton Shkaplerov works to secure one of the two Strela cranes in view of Oleg Kononenko's helmet camera during their spacewalk outside the International Space Station in this image from NASA TV February 16, 2012....more

Expedition 30 Russian Flight Engineer Anton Shkaplerov works to secure one of the two Strela cranes in view of Oleg Kononenko's helmet camera during their spacewalk outside the International Space Station in this image from NASA TV February 16, 2012. The spacewalkers will move one of the two Strela cranes from the Pirs Docking Compartment as they prepare for the replacement of Pirs with a new Russian laboratory and docking port. REUTERS/NASA TV/Handout

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<p>Astronomers are watching a delayed broadcast of a spectacular outburst from the unstable, behemoth double-star system Eta Carinae, an event initially seen on Earth nearly 170 years ago, as pictured in this NASA handout photo received by Reuters February 15, 2012. The images revealed light that seemed to dart through and illuminate a canyon of dust surrounding the doomed star system. Dubbed the "Great Eruption," the outburst first caught the attention of sky watchers in 1837 and was observed through 1858. But astronomers didn't have sophisticated science instruments to accurately record the star system's petulant activity. REUTERS/NASA/Handout </p>

Astronomers are watching a delayed broadcast of a spectacular outburst from the unstable, behemoth double-star system Eta Carinae, an event initially seen on Earth nearly 170 years ago, as pictured in this NASA handout photo received by Reuters...more

Astronomers are watching a delayed broadcast of a spectacular outburst from the unstable, behemoth double-star system Eta Carinae, an event initially seen on Earth nearly 170 years ago, as pictured in this NASA handout photo received by Reuters February 15, 2012. The images revealed light that seemed to dart through and illuminate a canyon of dust surrounding the doomed star system. Dubbed the "Great Eruption," the outburst first caught the attention of sky watchers in 1837 and was observed through 1858. But astronomers didn't have sophisticated science instruments to accurately record the star system's petulant activity. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

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<p>Europe's first Vega rocket lifts off from the European Space Agency (ESA) launch centre in Kourou, French Guiana, February 13, 2012. The Vega rocket blasted off from French Guiana on Monday in an inaugural flight aimed at giving Europe a vehicle for scientific satellite missions. The rocket took off from the European Space Agency's launch site in Kourou, French Guiana, on the northeast coast of South America at 7.00 a.m. (1000 GMT), with nine scientific satellites on board. REUTERS/ESA - S. Corvaja, 2012/Handout </p>

Europe's first Vega rocket lifts off from the European Space Agency (ESA) launch centre in Kourou, French Guiana, February 13, 2012. The Vega rocket blasted off from French Guiana on Monday in an inaugural flight aimed at giving Europe a vehicle for...more

Europe's first Vega rocket lifts off from the European Space Agency (ESA) launch centre in Kourou, French Guiana, February 13, 2012. The Vega rocket blasted off from French Guiana on Monday in an inaugural flight aimed at giving Europe a vehicle for scientific satellite missions. The rocket took off from the European Space Agency's launch site in Kourou, French Guiana, on the northeast coast of South America at 7.00 a.m. (1000 GMT), with nine scientific satellites on board. REUTERS/ESA - S. Corvaja, 2012/Handout

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<p>This images as observed by the NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), released on March 14, 2012, shows the central bright cloud of dust which is the blast wave moving through interstellar space heating up dust as it goes. The blast wave travels fast -- at an average speed of about 11,000 miles per second (18,000 kilometers per second). By the time WISE took this image, the blast wave has expanded out to about a distance of 21 light-years from the original explosion. The flash of light from the explosion, traveling at the speed of light, has covered well over 300 light-years. The orange-colored echoes further out from the central remnant are from interstellar dust that was heated by the supernova flash centuries after the original explosion.
  REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/Handout </p>

This images as observed by the NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), released on March 14, 2012, shows the central bright cloud of dust which is the blast wave moving through interstellar space heating up dust as it goes. The blast wave...more

This images as observed by the NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), released on March 14, 2012, shows the central bright cloud of dust which is the blast wave moving through interstellar space heating up dust as it goes. The blast wave travels fast -- at an average speed of about 11,000 miles per second (18,000 kilometers per second). By the time WISE took this image, the blast wave has expanded out to about a distance of 21 light-years from the original explosion. The flash of light from the explosion, traveling at the speed of light, has covered well over 300 light-years. The orange-colored echoes further out from the central remnant are from interstellar dust that was heated by the supernova flash centuries after the original explosion. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/Handout

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<p>A general view of the aurora borealis near the city of Tromsoe in northern Norway January 25, 2012. REUTERS/Rune Stoltz Bertinussen/Scanpix </p>

A general view of the aurora borealis near the city of Tromsoe in northern Norway January 25, 2012. REUTERS/Rune Stoltz Bertinussen/Scanpix

A general view of the aurora borealis near the city of Tromsoe in northern Norway January 25, 2012. REUTERS/Rune Stoltz Bertinussen/Scanpix

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<p>The space shuttle Atlantis is moved towards the huge Vertical Assembly Building for work in its decommissioning at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Cape Canaveral, Florida, January 20, 2012. Atlantis is slated to be displayed at the KSC Visitor's Complex at the following the end of the space shuttle program.   REUTERS/Joe Skipper   </p>

The space shuttle Atlantis is moved towards the huge Vertical Assembly Building for work in its decommissioning at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Cape Canaveral, Florida, January 20, 2012. Atlantis is slated to be displayed at the KSC Visitor's...more

The space shuttle Atlantis is moved towards the huge Vertical Assembly Building for work in its decommissioning at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Cape Canaveral, Florida, January 20, 2012. Atlantis is slated to be displayed at the KSC Visitor's Complex at the following the end of the space shuttle program. REUTERS/Joe Skipper

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<p>Flying past Saturn's moon Dione, Cassini captured this view which includes two smaller moons, Epimetheus and Prometheus, near the planet's rings in this NASA handout photo dated December 12, 2011. This encounter was the spacecraft's closest pass of the moon's surface. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/Handout</p>

Flying past Saturn's moon Dione, Cassini captured this view which includes two smaller moons, Epimetheus and Prometheus, near the planet's rings in this NASA handout photo dated December 12, 2011. This encounter was the spacecraft's closest pass of...more

Flying past Saturn's moon Dione, Cassini captured this view which includes two smaller moons, Epimetheus and Prometheus, near the planet's rings in this NASA handout photo dated December 12, 2011. This encounter was the spacecraft's closest pass of the moon's surface. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/Handout

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<p>Lights from the eastern coast of North America is seen in this January 29, 2012 handout photo by one of the Expedition 30 crew members aboard the International Space Station obtained by Reuters on February 3, 2012. It provides a look generally northeastward: Philadelphia-New York City-Boston corridor (bottom-center); western Lake Ontario shoreline with Toronto (left edge); Montreal (near center).  REUTERS/NASA/Handout</p>

Lights from the eastern coast of North America is seen in this January 29, 2012 handout photo by one of the Expedition 30 crew members aboard the International Space Station obtained by Reuters on February 3, 2012. It provides a look generally...more

Lights from the eastern coast of North America is seen in this January 29, 2012 handout photo by one of the Expedition 30 crew members aboard the International Space Station obtained by Reuters on February 3, 2012. It provides a look generally northeastward: Philadelphia-New York City-Boston corridor (bottom-center); western Lake Ontario shoreline with Toronto (left edge); Montreal (near center). REUTERS/NASA/Handout

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<p>A proposed Discovery Mission concept led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to investigate the formation and evolution of terrestrial planets by studying the deep interior of Mars now has a new name, InSight, and is seen in this artist's rendering released February 28, 2012.  InSight is one of three missions vying to be selected for flight in the Discovery Program, a series of NASA missions to understand the solar system by exploring planets, moons, and small bodies such as comets and asteroids.  REUTERS/NASA/Handout  </p>

A proposed Discovery Mission concept led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to investigate the formation and evolution of terrestrial planets by studying the deep interior of Mars now has a new name, InSight, and is seen in this artist's rendering...more

A proposed Discovery Mission concept led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to investigate the formation and evolution of terrestrial planets by studying the deep interior of Mars now has a new name, InSight, and is seen in this artist's rendering released February 28, 2012. InSight is one of three missions vying to be selected for flight in the Discovery Program, a series of NASA missions to understand the solar system by exploring planets, moons, and small bodies such as comets and asteroids. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

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<p>The Jamesburg Earth Station is seen in Cachagua Valley, near Carmel, California, February 23, 2012. The earth station, which helped bring Apollo 11's first images from the moon, was an important link for the nation's television, telephone and military networks from 1968 to 2002. Current owner Jeff Bullis, a Silicon Valley businessman, is selling the 97-foot satellite receiver and a 21,718 square foot bunker-like support building on 161 acres of land for close to $3 million.  REUTERS/Michael Fiala </p>

The Jamesburg Earth Station is seen in Cachagua Valley, near Carmel, California, February 23, 2012. The earth station, which helped bring Apollo 11's first images from the moon, was an important link for the nation's television, telephone and...more

The Jamesburg Earth Station is seen in Cachagua Valley, near Carmel, California, February 23, 2012. The earth station, which helped bring Apollo 11's first images from the moon, was an important link for the nation's television, telephone and military networks from 1968 to 2002. Current owner Jeff Bullis, a Silicon Valley businessman, is selling the 97-foot satellite receiver and a 21,718 square foot bunker-like support building on 161 acres of land for close to $3 million. REUTERS/Michael Fiala

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<p>U.S. astronaut Michael Hopkins takes part in a training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow February 10, 2012. Hopkins is part of a team that is scheduled to launch on a mission to the International Space Station at the end of 2013.  REUTERS/Sergei Remezov  </p>

U.S. astronaut Michael Hopkins takes part in a training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow February 10, 2012. Hopkins is part of a team that is scheduled to launch on a mission to the International Space Station at the...more

U.S. astronaut Michael Hopkins takes part in a training exercise at the Star City cosmonaut training centre outside Moscow February 10, 2012. Hopkins is part of a team that is scheduled to launch on a mission to the International Space Station at the end of 2013. REUTERS/Sergei Remezov

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