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Pictures | Tue Aug 21, 2012 | 9:36pm IST

The art of Damien Hirst

<p>Visitors stand at a balcony behind the Damien Hirst sculpture "Hymn" outside the Tate Modern gallery in London August 21, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth </p>

Visitors stand at a balcony behind the Damien Hirst sculpture "Hymn" outside the Tate Modern gallery in London August 21, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

Visitors stand at a balcony behind the Damien Hirst sculpture "Hymn" outside the Tate Modern gallery in London August 21, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

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<p>A visitor views "A Thousand Years", flies feeding off a cow's head by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012.  REUTERS/Toby Melville </p>

A visitor views "A Thousand Years", flies feeding off a cow's head by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Toby Melville

A visitor views "A Thousand Years", flies feeding off a cow's head by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Toby Melville

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<p>Visitors are reflected in "Lullaby, The Seasons" - a collection of pharmaceuticals by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012.    REUTERS/Toby Melville </p>

Visitors are reflected in "Lullaby, The Seasons" - a collection of pharmaceuticals by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Visitors are reflected in "Lullaby, The Seasons" - a collection of pharmaceuticals by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Toby Melville

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<p>Visitors view "Mother and Child Divided", a bisected cow (in cases on L) and calf by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Toby Melville</p>

Visitors view "Mother and Child Divided", a bisected cow (in cases on L) and calf by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Visitors view "Mother and Child Divided", a bisected cow (in cases on L) and calf by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Toby Melville

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<p>A visitor views a Spin Painting by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. Hirst's retrospective show runs from April 4 to September 9.  REUTERS/Toby Melville </p>

A visitor views a Spin Painting by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. Hirst's retrospective show runs from April 4 to September 9. REUTERS/Toby Melville

A visitor views a Spin Painting by British artist Damien Hirst at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. Hirst's retrospective show runs from April 4 to September 9. REUTERS/Toby Melville

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<p>British artist Damien Hirst poses next to his painting "I Am Become Death, Shatterer of Worlds (2006)", at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012.  REUTERS/Toby Melville </p>

British artist Damien Hirst poses next to his painting "I Am Become Death, Shatterer of Worlds (2006)", at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Toby Melville

British artist Damien Hirst poses next to his painting "I Am Become Death, Shatterer of Worlds (2006)", at the Tate Modern gallery in London April 2, 2012. REUTERS/Toby Melville

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<p>A woman looks at a painting by Damien Hirst at a preview for his exhibition "Damien Hirst: The Complete Spot Paintings 1986-2011" at the Gagosian Gallery in central London, January 12, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly </p>

A woman looks at a painting by Damien Hirst at a preview for his exhibition "Damien Hirst: The Complete Spot Paintings 1986-2011" at the Gagosian Gallery in central London, January 12, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

A woman looks at a painting by Damien Hirst at a preview for his exhibition "Damien Hirst: The Complete Spot Paintings 1986-2011" at the Gagosian Gallery in central London, January 12, 2012. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

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<p>The Duke and Duchess of Devonshire view the sculpture Legend by Damien Hirst in the gardens of their home Chatsworth House in central England September 9, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Staples </p>

The Duke and Duchess of Devonshire view the sculpture Legend by Damien Hirst in the gardens of their home Chatsworth House in central England September 9, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Staples

The Duke and Duchess of Devonshire view the sculpture Legend by Damien Hirst in the gardens of their home Chatsworth House in central England September 9, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Staples

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<p>Women look at an exhibit by the artist Damien Hirst at the Frieze Art Fair in London October 14, 2010. REUTERS/Paul Hackett </p>

Women look at an exhibit by the artist Damien Hirst at the Frieze Art Fair in London October 14, 2010. REUTERS/Paul Hackett

Women look at an exhibit by the artist Damien Hirst at the Frieze Art Fair in London October 14, 2010. REUTERS/Paul Hackett

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<p>British artist Damien Hirst attends a media preview of his exhibition "Forgotten Promises" in Hong Kong Janaury 14, 2011. REUTERS/Bobby Yip </p>

British artist Damien Hirst attends a media preview of his exhibition "Forgotten Promises" in Hong Kong Janaury 14, 2011. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

British artist Damien Hirst attends a media preview of his exhibition "Forgotten Promises" in Hong Kong Janaury 14, 2011. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

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<p>A staff member of Seoul Auction poses in front of a Damien Hirst art-piece, "Tranquility", created with butterflies, during a press preview in Hong Kong May 13, 2009.   REUTERS/Aaron Tam </p>

A staff member of Seoul Auction poses in front of a Damien Hirst art-piece, "Tranquility", created with butterflies, during a press preview in Hong Kong May 13, 2009. REUTERS/Aaron Tam

A staff member of Seoul Auction poses in front of a Damien Hirst art-piece, "Tranquility", created with butterflies, during a press preview in Hong Kong May 13, 2009. REUTERS/Aaron Tam

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<p>An art handler places drugs for the art installation 'In this terrible moment we are victims clinging helplessly to an environment that refuses to acknowledge the soul' by British artist Damien Hirst in the new Brandhorst modern art museum in Munich, May 6, 2009.   REUTERS/Alexandra Beier </p>

An art handler places drugs for the art installation 'In this terrible moment we are victims clinging helplessly to an environment that refuses to acknowledge the soul' by British artist Damien Hirst in the new Brandhorst modern art museum in Munich,...more

An art handler places drugs for the art installation 'In this terrible moment we are victims clinging helplessly to an environment that refuses to acknowledge the soul' by British artist Damien Hirst in the new Brandhorst modern art museum in Munich, May 6, 2009. REUTERS/Alexandra Beier

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<p>British artist Damien Hirst stands next to one of his sculptures during a press preview of his exhibition at the Pinchuk Art Center in Kiev April 23, 2009.   REUTERS/Konstantin Chernichkin</p>

British artist Damien Hirst stands next to one of his sculptures during a press preview of his exhibition at the Pinchuk Art Center in Kiev April 23, 2009. REUTERS/Konstantin Chernichkin

British artist Damien Hirst stands next to one of his sculptures during a press preview of his exhibition at the Pinchuk Art Center in Kiev April 23, 2009. REUTERS/Konstantin Chernichkin

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<p>People watch British artist Damien Hirst produce a piece of work in the Pinchuk Art Center in Kiev April 23, 2009.   REUTERS/Pinchuk Art Center/Handout </p>

People watch British artist Damien Hirst produce a piece of work in the Pinchuk Art Center in Kiev April 23, 2009. REUTERS/Pinchuk Art Center/Handout

People watch British artist Damien Hirst produce a piece of work in the Pinchuk Art Center in Kiev April 23, 2009. REUTERS/Pinchuk Art Center/Handout

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<p>A visitor walks behind "Anatomy of an Angel" by Damien Hirst during a preview of an upcoming auction of his work "Beautiful Inside My Head Forever" at Sotheby's in London September 8, 2008.   REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett</p>

A visitor walks behind "Anatomy of an Angel" by Damien Hirst during a preview of an upcoming auction of his work "Beautiful Inside My Head Forever" at Sotheby's in London September 8, 2008. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett

A visitor walks behind "Anatomy of an Angel" by Damien Hirst during a preview of an upcoming auction of his work "Beautiful Inside My Head Forever" at Sotheby's in London September 8, 2008. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett

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<p>Visitors walk through a gallery containing works by Damien Hirst, collectively entitled 'Beautiful Inside My Head Forever,' at Sotheby's in London on September 8, 2008.  REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett   </p>

Visitors walk through a gallery containing works by Damien Hirst, collectively entitled 'Beautiful Inside My Head Forever,' at Sotheby's in London on September 8, 2008. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett

Visitors walk through a gallery containing works by Damien Hirst, collectively entitled 'Beautiful Inside My Head Forever,' at Sotheby's in London on September 8, 2008. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett

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<p>A member of the media looks at Damien Hirst's "Mother and Child Divided 1993" during a media preview of a retrospective of the Turner Prize at the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo April 24, 2008.  REUTERS/Toru Hanai </p>

A member of the media looks at Damien Hirst's "Mother and Child Divided 1993" during a media preview of a retrospective of the Turner Prize at the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo April 24, 2008. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

A member of the media looks at Damien Hirst's "Mother and Child Divided 1993" during a media preview of a retrospective of the Turner Prize at the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo April 24, 2008. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

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<p>Visitors view Damien Hirst's "All You Need Is Love" at Sotheby's auction house in central London December 5, 2007.    REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico     </p>

Visitors view Damien Hirst's "All You Need Is Love" at Sotheby's auction house in central London December 5, 2007. REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico

Visitors view Damien Hirst's "All You Need Is Love" at Sotheby's auction house in central London December 5, 2007. REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico

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<p>A visitor views 'Love's Paradox' - a cow in formaldehyde -  at a new exhibition by British artist Damien Hirst in central London June 1, 2007.  REUTERS/Toby Melville </p>

A visitor views 'Love's Paradox' - a cow in formaldehyde - at a new exhibition by British artist Damien Hirst in central London June 1, 2007. REUTERS/Toby Melville

A visitor views 'Love's Paradox' - a cow in formaldehyde - at a new exhibition by British artist Damien Hirst in central London June 1, 2007. REUTERS/Toby Melville

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<p>"For the love of God," a life size cast of a human skull in platinum by British artist Damien Hirst is seen in this handout image released in London June 1, 2007. The Skull is covered by 8,601 pave-set diamonds weighing 1,106.18 carats. REUTERS/Prudence Cuming Associates/Handout </p>

"For the love of God," a life size cast of a human skull in platinum by British artist Damien Hirst is seen in this handout image released in London June 1, 2007. The Skull is covered by 8,601 pave-set diamonds weighing 1,106.18 carats....more

"For the love of God," a life size cast of a human skull in platinum by British artist Damien Hirst is seen in this handout image released in London June 1, 2007. The Skull is covered by 8,601 pave-set diamonds weighing 1,106.18 carats. REUTERS/Prudence Cuming Associates/Handout

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<p>Visitors walk behind a work by British artist Damien Hirst titled "The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living" at the Kunsthaus in Bregenz February 17, 2007. REUTERS/Miro Kuzmanovic </p>

Visitors walk behind a work by British artist Damien Hirst titled "The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living" at the Kunsthaus in Bregenz February 17, 2007. REUTERS/Miro Kuzmanovic

Visitors walk behind a work by British artist Damien Hirst titled "The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living" at the Kunsthaus in Bregenz February 17, 2007. REUTERS/Miro Kuzmanovic

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<p>Women dressed as clowns look at work by British artist Damien Hirst titled "Iodomethane - 13C" at the Kunsthaus in Bregenz February 17, 2007. REUTERS/Miro Kuzmanovic </p>

Women dressed as clowns look at work by British artist Damien Hirst titled "Iodomethane - 13C" at the Kunsthaus in Bregenz February 17, 2007. REUTERS/Miro Kuzmanovic

Women dressed as clowns look at work by British artist Damien Hirst titled "Iodomethane - 13C" at the Kunsthaus in Bregenz February 17, 2007. REUTERS/Miro Kuzmanovic

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<p>A security guard at the San Carlos museum in Mexico City sits in her chair behind a piece by British artist Damien Hirst titled "Adam and Eve under the table" between two 16th century paintings October 6, 2006. REUTERS/Andrew Winning </p>

A security guard at the San Carlos museum in Mexico City sits in her chair behind a piece by British artist Damien Hirst titled "Adam and Eve under the table" between two 16th century paintings October 6, 2006. REUTERS/Andrew Winning

A security guard at the San Carlos museum in Mexico City sits in her chair behind a piece by British artist Damien Hirst titled "Adam and Eve under the table" between two 16th century paintings October 6, 2006. REUTERS/Andrew Winning

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<p>A bronze statue entitled 'The Virgin mother' by artist Damien Hirst is displayed in the courtyard of the Royal Academy of Arts in central London as part of its 238th Summer Exhibition June 7, 2006.  REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico </p>

A bronze statue entitled 'The Virgin mother' by artist Damien Hirst is displayed in the courtyard of the Royal Academy of Arts in central London as part of its 238th Summer Exhibition June 7, 2006. REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico

A bronze statue entitled 'The Virgin mother' by artist Damien Hirst is displayed in the courtyard of the Royal Academy of Arts in central London as part of its 238th Summer Exhibition June 7, 2006. REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico

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<p>A visitor to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City contemplate a piece by Damien Hirst titled "In the name of the father" consisting of sheep crucified and suspended in formaldehyde February 23, 2006.  REUTERS/Andrew Winning</p>

A visitor to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City contemplate a piece by Damien Hirst titled "In the name of the father" consisting of sheep crucified and suspended in formaldehyde February 23, 2006. REUTERS/Andrew Winning

A visitor to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City contemplate a piece by Damien Hirst titled "In the name of the father" consisting of sheep crucified and suspended in formaldehyde February 23, 2006. REUTERS/Andrew Winning

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<p>A visitor to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City takes a photo as she stands infront a piece by Damien Hirst titled "Faithless" consisting of butterfly wings on canvas and household gloss February 23, 2006.  REUTERS/Andrew Winning</p>

A visitor to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City takes a photo as she stands infront a piece by Damien Hirst titled "Faithless" consisting of butterfly wings on canvas and household gloss February 23, 2006. REUTERS/Andrew Winning

A visitor to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City takes a photo as she stands infront a piece by Damien Hirst titled "Faithless" consisting of butterfly wings on canvas and household gloss February 23, 2006. REUTERS/Andrew Winning

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<p>Visitors to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City contemplate a piece by British artist Damien Hirst titled "The wrath of God" consisting of a shark in formaldehyde February 23, 2006.  REUTERS/Andrew Winning</p>

Visitors to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City contemplate a piece by British artist Damien Hirst titled "The wrath of God" consisting of a shark in formaldehyde February 23, 2006. REUTERS/Andrew Winning

Visitors to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City contemplate a piece by British artist Damien Hirst titled "The wrath of God" consisting of a shark in formaldehyde February 23, 2006. REUTERS/Andrew Winning

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<p>Visitors to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City contemplate a piece by Damien Hirst titled "The Sacred Heart of Jesus" consisting of a bulls heart pierced with assorted surgical instruments suspended in formaldehyde February 23, 2006.  REUTERS/Andrew Winning</p>

Visitors to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City contemplate a piece by Damien Hirst titled "The Sacred Heart of Jesus" consisting of a bulls heart pierced with assorted surgical instruments suspended in formaldehyde February 23, 2006. ...more

Visitors to the Hilario Galguera gallery in Mexico City contemplate a piece by Damien Hirst titled "The Sacred Heart of Jesus" consisting of a bulls heart pierced with assorted surgical instruments suspended in formaldehyde February 23, 2006. REUTERS/Andrew Winning

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<p>Artwork 'Full of Love' by Britain's Damien Hirst is seen at Sotheby's auctioneers in London, October 14, 2004.  REUTERS/Stephen Hird</p>

Artwork 'Full of Love' by Britain's Damien Hirst is seen at Sotheby's auctioneers in London, October 14, 2004. REUTERS/Stephen Hird

Artwork 'Full of Love' by Britain's Damien Hirst is seen at Sotheby's auctioneers in London, October 14, 2004. REUTERS/Stephen Hird

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<p>An auctioneer's assistant holds up the artwork 'Molecular Structure' by British artist Damien Hirst at Sotheby's in London, October 14, 2004.  REUTERS/Stephen Hird </p>

An auctioneer's assistant holds up the artwork 'Molecular Structure' by British artist Damien Hirst at Sotheby's in London, October 14, 2004. REUTERS/Stephen Hird

An auctioneer's assistant holds up the artwork 'Molecular Structure' by British artist Damien Hirst at Sotheby's in London, October 14, 2004. REUTERS/Stephen Hird

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<p>A man looks at a work by British artist Damien Hirst titled "In His Infinite Wisdom" which forms part of the In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida exhibition at London's Tate Britain gallery, March 2, 2004. REUTERS/Peter MacDiarmid</p>

A man looks at a work by British artist Damien Hirst titled "In His Infinite Wisdom" which forms part of the In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida exhibition at London's Tate Britain gallery, March 2, 2004. REUTERS/Peter MacDiarmid

A man looks at a work by British artist Damien Hirst titled "In His Infinite Wisdom" which forms part of the In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida exhibition at London's Tate Britain gallery, March 2, 2004. REUTERS/Peter MacDiarmid

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<p>Damien Hirst's "Away From the Flock", a lamb preserved in formaldehyde in a steel and glass case, is seen on display at the new Saatchi Gallery in London, April 14, 2003.   REUTERS/Peter MacDiarmid</p>

Damien Hirst's "Away From the Flock", a lamb preserved in formaldehyde in a steel and glass case, is seen on display at the new Saatchi Gallery in London, April 14, 2003. REUTERS/Peter MacDiarmid

Damien Hirst's "Away From the Flock", a lamb preserved in formaldehyde in a steel and glass case, is seen on display at the new Saatchi Gallery in London, April 14, 2003. REUTERS/Peter MacDiarmid

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