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Pictures | Fri Jul 12, 2013 | 9:20pm IST

The story of Malala Yousafzai

<p>Malala Yousafzai (L) gives her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, July 12, 2013. Wearing a pink head scarf, Yousafzai told U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (top R) and nearly 1,000 students from around the world attending a Youth Assembly at U.N. headquarters in New York that education was the only way to improve lives. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid</p>

Malala Yousafzai (L) gives her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, July 12, 2013. Wearing a pink head scarf, Yousafzai told U.N....more

Malala Yousafzai (L) gives her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, July 12, 2013. Wearing a pink head scarf, Yousafzai told U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (top R) and nearly 1,000 students from around the world attending a Youth Assembly at U.N. headquarters in New York that education was the only way to improve lives. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

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<p>Malala Yousafzai arrives for a meeting with Secretary-General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon (not pictured), prior to her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the U.N. Headquarters in New York, July 12, 2013.   REUTERS/Brendan McDermid</p>

Malala Yousafzai arrives for a meeting with Secretary-General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon (not pictured), prior to her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the U.N. Headquarters in...more

Malala Yousafzai arrives for a meeting with Secretary-General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon (not pictured), prior to her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the U.N. Headquarters in New York, July 12, 2013. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

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<p>Malala Yousafzai gives her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, July 12, 2013.   REUTERS/Brendan McDermid</p>

Malala Yousafzai gives her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, July 12, 2013. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Malala Yousafzai gives her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, July 12, 2013. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

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<p>Malala Yousafzai, gives her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, July 12, 2013.  REUTERS/Brendan McDermid</p>

Malala Yousafzai, gives her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, July 12, 2013. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Malala Yousafzai, gives her first speech since the Taliban in Pakistan tried to kill her for advocating education for girls, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, July 12, 2013. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

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<p>Pakistani schoolgirl, Malala Yousufzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating girls' education, is seen sitting in her hospital bed in this undated still picture taken from video provided by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, in Birmingham, central England, and received in London on February 4, 2013.  REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital/Handout</p>

Pakistani schoolgirl, Malala Yousufzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating girls' education, is seen sitting in her hospital bed in this undated still picture taken from video provided by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, in...more

Pakistani schoolgirl, Malala Yousufzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating girls' education, is seen sitting in her hospital bed in this undated still picture taken from video provided by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, in Birmingham, central England, and received in London on February 4, 2013. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital/Handout

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<p>Pakistani schoolgirl, Malala Yousufzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating girls' education, is seen speaking to critical care consultant Mav Manji, in this undated still picture taken from video provided by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, in Birmingham, central England, and received in London on February 4, 2013.   REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital/Handout</p>

Pakistani schoolgirl, Malala Yousufzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating girls' education, is seen speaking to critical care consultant Mav Manji, in this undated still picture taken from video provided by the Queen Elizabeth...more

Pakistani schoolgirl, Malala Yousufzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating girls' education, is seen speaking to critical care consultant Mav Manji, in this undated still picture taken from video provided by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, in Birmingham, central England, and received in London on February 4, 2013. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital/Handout

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<p>Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai (C) waves with nurses as she is discharged from The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham in this handout photograph released on January 4, 2013.   REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham/Handout</p>

Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai (C) waves with nurses as she is discharged from The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham in this handout photograph released on January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham/Handout

Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai (C) waves with nurses as she is discharged from The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham in this handout photograph released on January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham/Handout

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<p>Pakistan's President Asif Zardari meets with schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai (R) during his visit to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, central England December 8, 2012. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital/Handout</p>

Pakistan's President Asif Zardari meets with schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai (R) during his visit to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, central England December 8, 2012. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital/Handout

Pakistan's President Asif Zardari meets with schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai (R) during his visit to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, central England December 8, 2012. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital/Handout

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<p>Children of supporters of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) party hold potraits of Malala Yousufzai in Karachi November 10, 2012. REUTERS/Athar Hussain</p>

Children of supporters of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) party hold potraits of Malala Yousufzai in Karachi November 10, 2012. REUTERS/Athar Hussain

Children of supporters of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) party hold potraits of Malala Yousufzai in Karachi November 10, 2012. REUTERS/Athar Hussain

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<p>Civil society members hold a banner with an image of Malala Yousufzai as they mark Malala Day in Peshawar November 10, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz</p>

Civil society members hold a banner with an image of Malala Yousufzai as they mark Malala Day in Peshawar November 10, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz

Civil society members hold a banner with an image of Malala Yousufzai as they mark Malala Day in Peshawar November 10, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz

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<p>Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai talks to her father, Ziauddin Yousufzai, as she recuperates at the The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, in this undated handout photograph released to Reuters on November 8, 2012. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham/Handout</p>

Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai talks to her father, Ziauddin Yousufzai, as she recuperates at the The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, in this undated handout photograph released to Reuters on November 8, 2012. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth...more

Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai talks to her father, Ziauddin Yousufzai, as she recuperates at the The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, in this undated handout photograph released to Reuters on November 8, 2012. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham/Handout

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<p>Malala Yousufzai is seen with her father Ziauddin and her two younger brothers Khushal Khan and Atal Khan (R), as she recuperates at the The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, in this photograph taken October 25, 2012 and released October 26, 2012.   REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham/Handout</p>

Malala Yousufzai is seen with her father Ziauddin and her two younger brothers Khushal Khan and Atal Khan (R), as she recuperates at the The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, in this photograph taken October 25, 2012 and released October 26,...more

Malala Yousufzai is seen with her father Ziauddin and her two younger brothers Khushal Khan and Atal Khan (R), as she recuperates at the The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, in this photograph taken October 25, 2012 and released October 26, 2012. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham/Handout

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<p>Ziauddin Yousufzai, accompanied by his 12-year-old son Khushal, talks to the media after visiting his daughter Malala at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, northern England October 26, 2012. The father of a Pakistani girl who was shot in the head by the the Taliban for advocating girls' education said on Friday his daughter was strong and would "rise again" to pursue her dreams after receiving treatment in a British hospital. REUTERS/David Jones/Pool</p>

Ziauddin Yousufzai, accompanied by his 12-year-old son Khushal, talks to the media after visiting his daughter Malala at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, northern England October 26, 2012. The father of a Pakistani girl who was shot in the...more

Ziauddin Yousufzai, accompanied by his 12-year-old son Khushal, talks to the media after visiting his daughter Malala at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, northern England October 26, 2012. The father of a Pakistani girl who was shot in the head by the the Taliban for advocating girls' education said on Friday his daughter was strong and would "rise again" to pursue her dreams after receiving treatment in a British hospital. REUTERS/David Jones/Pool

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<p>Malala Yousufzai is seen recuperating at the The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham in this handout photograph released October 19, 2012. Malala, a Pakistani girl shot in the head by Taliban gunmen is "not out of the woods" but is doing well and has been able to stand for the first time with some help, doctors at the British hospital treating her said on Friday. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham/Handout</p>

Malala Yousufzai is seen recuperating at the The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham in this handout photograph released October 19, 2012. Malala, a Pakistani girl shot in the head by Taliban gunmen is "not out of the woods" but is doing well and...more

Malala Yousufzai is seen recuperating at the The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham in this handout photograph released October 19, 2012. Malala, a Pakistani girl shot in the head by Taliban gunmen is "not out of the woods" but is doing well and has been able to stand for the first time with some help, doctors at the British hospital treating her said on Friday. REUTERS/Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham/Handout

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<p>Hospital staff assists Malala Yousufzai, a 14-year-old schoolgirl who was wounded in a gun attack, at the Saidu Sharif Teaching Hospital in the Swat Valley, northwest Pakistan October 9, 2012. Taliban gunmen in Pakistan shot and seriously wounded a 14-year-old schoolgirl who rose to fame for speaking out against the militants, authorities said. REUTERS/Mohammad Muzamil</p>

Hospital staff assists Malala Yousufzai, a 14-year-old schoolgirl who was wounded in a gun attack, at the Saidu Sharif Teaching Hospital in the Swat Valley, northwest Pakistan October 9, 2012. Taliban gunmen in Pakistan shot and seriously wounded a...more

Hospital staff assists Malala Yousufzai, a 14-year-old schoolgirl who was wounded in a gun attack, at the Saidu Sharif Teaching Hospital in the Swat Valley, northwest Pakistan October 9, 2012. Taliban gunmen in Pakistan shot and seriously wounded a 14-year-old schoolgirl who rose to fame for speaking out against the militants, authorities said. REUTERS/Mohammad Muzamil

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<p>Hospital staff assist Malala Yousufzai, a 14-year-old schoolgirl who was wounded in a gun attack, at Saidu Sharif Teaching Hospital in the Swat Valley region in northwest Pakistan October 9, 2012. Yousufzai became famous for speaking out against the Pakistani Taliban at a time when even the government seemed to be appeasing the hardline Islamists. REUTERS/Hazart Ali Bacha</p>

Hospital staff assist Malala Yousufzai, a 14-year-old schoolgirl who was wounded in a gun attack, at Saidu Sharif Teaching Hospital in the Swat Valley region in northwest Pakistan October 9, 2012. Yousufzai became famous for speaking out against the...more

Hospital staff assist Malala Yousufzai, a 14-year-old schoolgirl who was wounded in a gun attack, at Saidu Sharif Teaching Hospital in the Swat Valley region in northwest Pakistan October 9, 2012. Yousufzai became famous for speaking out against the Pakistani Taliban at a time when even the government seemed to be appeasing the hardline Islamists. REUTERS/Hazart Ali Bacha

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<p>Malala Yousufzai, a Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban on October 9, 2012 for speaking out against the militants and promoting education for girls, is seen in Swat Valley, northwest Pakistan, in this undated file photo.   REUTERS/Stringer</p>

Malala Yousufzai, a Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban on October 9, 2012 for speaking out against the militants and promoting education for girls, is seen in Swat Valley, northwest Pakistan, in this undated file photo. ...more

Malala Yousufzai, a Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban on October 9, 2012 for speaking out against the militants and promoting education for girls, is seen in Swat Valley, northwest Pakistan, in this undated file photo. REUTERS/Stringer

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<p>Malala Yousufzai, a 14-year-old schoolgirl, who was wounded in a gun attack, is seen in Swat Valley, northwest Pakistan, in this undated file photo.   REUTERS/Hazart Ali Bacha/Files</p>

Malala Yousufzai, a 14-year-old schoolgirl, who was wounded in a gun attack, is seen in Swat Valley, northwest Pakistan, in this undated file photo. REUTERS/Hazart Ali Bacha/Files

Malala Yousufzai, a 14-year-old schoolgirl, who was wounded in a gun attack, is seen in Swat Valley, northwest Pakistan, in this undated file photo. REUTERS/Hazart Ali Bacha/Files

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<p>A protester carries a portrait of 14-year-old Pakistani girl, Malala Yousufzai, during a candlelight vigil by a women's group in Hong Kong October 19, 2012.   REUTERS/Bobby Yip</p>

A protester carries a portrait of 14-year-old Pakistani girl, Malala Yousufzai, during a candlelight vigil by a women's group in Hong Kong October 19, 2012. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

A protester carries a portrait of 14-year-old Pakistani girl, Malala Yousufzai, during a candlelight vigil by a women's group in Hong Kong October 19, 2012. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

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<p>Activists from non-governmental organisations in support of human rights hold pictures of Malala Yousufzai during a demonstration in Islamabad October 10, 2012.  REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood</p>

Activists from non-governmental organisations in support of human rights hold pictures of Malala Yousufzai during a demonstration in Islamabad October 10, 2012. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood

Activists from non-governmental organisations in support of human rights hold pictures of Malala Yousufzai during a demonstration in Islamabad October 10, 2012. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood

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<p>Students pray for the speedy recovery of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban for speaking out against the militants and promoting education for girls, at a school in Peshawar October 12, 2012.   REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz</p>

Students pray for the speedy recovery of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban for speaking out against the militants and promoting education for girls, at a school in Peshawar October 12, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz more

Students pray for the speedy recovery of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban for speaking out against the militants and promoting education for girls, at a school in Peshawar October 12, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz

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<p>Women hold lighted candles during a rally condemning the attack on schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, in Karachi October 11, 2012.   REUTERS/Athar Hussain</p>

Women hold lighted candles during a rally condemning the attack on schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, in Karachi October 11, 2012. REUTERS/Athar Hussain

Women hold lighted candles during a rally condemning the attack on schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, in Karachi October 11, 2012. REUTERS/Athar Hussain

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<p>A picture of Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban for speaking out against the militants and promoting education for girls, is displayed next to lighted candles in Lahore October 12, 2012. The Urdu words under her picture read, "Daughter of the nation, symbol of peace, the nation prays for you, Malala Yousufzai". REUTERS/Mohsin Raza</p>

A picture of Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban for speaking out against the militants and promoting education for girls, is displayed next to lighted candles in Lahore October 12, 2012. The Urdu words under her picture read,...more

A picture of Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban for speaking out against the militants and promoting education for girls, is displayed next to lighted candles in Lahore October 12, 2012. The Urdu words under her picture read, "Daughter of the nation, symbol of peace, the nation prays for you, Malala Yousufzai". REUTERS/Mohsin Raza

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<p>A female supporter of the National Commission of Human Development (NCHD) prays next to pictures of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban, during a candlelight vigil for her speedy recovery, in Karachi October 13, 2012.   REUTERS/Athar Hussain</p>

A female supporter of the National Commission of Human Development (NCHD) prays next to pictures of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban, during a candlelight vigil for her speedy recovery, in Karachi October 13, 2012. ...more

A female supporter of the National Commission of Human Development (NCHD) prays next to pictures of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban, during a candlelight vigil for her speedy recovery, in Karachi October 13, 2012. REUTERS/Athar Hussain

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<p>Students hold pictures of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban, at a school in Karachi October 13, 2012.  REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed</p>

Students hold pictures of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban, at a school in Karachi October 13, 2012. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed

Students hold pictures of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban, at a school in Karachi October 13, 2012. REUTERS/Naseer Ahmed

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<p>Devotees pray for schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on October 9 by the Taliban, at a Sunday service at the Sacred Heart Cathedral in Lahore October 14, 2012.   REUTERS/Mohsin Raza</p>

Devotees pray for schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on October 9 by the Taliban, at a Sunday service at the Sacred Heart Cathedral in Lahore October 14, 2012. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza

Devotees pray for schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on October 9 by the Taliban, at a Sunday service at the Sacred Heart Cathedral in Lahore October 14, 2012. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza

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<p>A portrait of Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on October 9 by the Taliban, is displayed during a Sunday service at the Sacred Heart Cathedral in Lahore on October 14, 2012.   REUTERS/Mohsin Raza</p>

A portrait of Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on October 9 by the Taliban, is displayed during a Sunday service at the Sacred Heart Cathedral in Lahore on October 14, 2012. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza

A portrait of Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on October 9 by the Taliban, is displayed during a Sunday service at the Sacred Heart Cathedral in Lahore on October 14, 2012. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza

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<p>A girl holds a placard next to an image of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on October 9 by the Taliban, during a rally organized by National Students Federation (NSF) in Lahore October 15, 2012.   REUTERS/Mohsin Raza</p>

A girl holds a placard next to an image of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on October 9 by the Taliban, during a rally organized by National Students Federation (NSF) in Lahore October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza

A girl holds a placard next to an image of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot on October 9 by the Taliban, during a rally organized by National Students Federation (NSF) in Lahore October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza

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<p>Students hold pictures of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban, during a tribute at the Pakistani Embassy in Abu Dhabi October 15, 2012.    REUTERS/Ben Job</p>

Students hold pictures of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban, during a tribute at the Pakistani Embassy in Abu Dhabi October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Job

Students hold pictures of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban, during a tribute at the Pakistani Embassy in Abu Dhabi October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Ben Job

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<p>A girl holding a portrait of Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai participates during a candlelight vigil organized by Nepalese Youth in Kathmandu October 15, 2012.   REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar</p>

A girl holding a portrait of Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai participates during a candlelight vigil organized by Nepalese Youth in Kathmandu October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar

A girl holding a portrait of Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai participates during a candlelight vigil organized by Nepalese Youth in Kathmandu October 15, 2012. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar

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