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Pictures | Sat Apr 29, 2017 | 3:00am IST

Trump voters of Obama country

Tom Moyer, 50, speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, April 24, 2017. Some of his supporters fret that President Donald Trump is backing himself into a corner with promises that can't be kept. Others lament he is not pulling America from international conflicts as he vowed -- or say he should "get off of Twitter." Those grumbles are early warning signs for Trump as he marks his 100th day in office. They were heard in Reuters interviews with Trump supporters in "swing" counties that went for Democrat Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012 but then flipped for Trump last year -- a slice of the electorate dominated by white voters that is crucial to the Republican's re-election hopes and that Democrats want to win back.  REUTERS/Julia Rendleman

Tom Moyer, 50, speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, April 24, 2017. Some of his supporters fret that President Donald Trump is backing himself into a...more

Tom Moyer, 50, speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, April 24, 2017. Some of his supporters fret that President Donald Trump is backing himself into a corner with promises that can't be kept. Others lament he is not pulling America from international conflicts as he vowed -- or say he should "get off of Twitter." Those grumbles are early warning signs for Trump as he marks his 100th day in office. They were heard in Reuters interviews with Trump supporters in "swing" counties that went for Democrat Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012 but then flipped for Trump last year -- a slice of the electorate dominated by white voters that is crucial to the Republican's re-election hopes and that Democrats want to win back. REUTERS/Julia Rendleman
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Lillian Thomas, 57, a nurse, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. What Reuters reporters found this time in more than two dozen interviews is that Trump voters are largely standing with their man but with signs of restlessness, mainly over foreign policy, concerns over getting legislation through Congress and some skepticism that he won't be able to follow through with promises -- from building a wall along the Mexican border to repealing Obama's signature healthcare law. But rather than bash Trump, many largely blamed Democrats and Republicans alike, a fractured Congress, the federal judiciary, and what they see as a hostile news media.     REUTERS/Mark Makela

Lillian Thomas, 57, a nurse, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. What Reuters reporters found this time in more than two dozen interviews is that Trump voters are largely standing with their man but with signs of...more

Lillian Thomas, 57, a nurse, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. What Reuters reporters found this time in more than two dozen interviews is that Trump voters are largely standing with their man but with signs of restlessness, mainly over foreign policy, concerns over getting legislation through Congress and some skepticism that he won't be able to follow through with promises -- from building a wall along the Mexican border to repealing Obama's signature healthcare law. But rather than bash Trump, many largely blamed Democrats and Republicans alike, a fractured Congress, the federal judiciary, and what they see as a hostile news media. REUTERS/Mark Makela
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Barber Andrew Ciresi (R) cuts Domenico Brienza's hair as he speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Pinellas County, Florida, April 25, 2017. Trump voters showed a willingness to trust the president almost implicitly, saw him as a tireless worker, and appreciated his efforts to secure the border and curb immigration. They had little interest in the in-fighting between his senior aides in the White House. REUTERS/Steve Nesius

Barber Andrew Ciresi (R) cuts Domenico Brienza's hair as he speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Pinellas County, Florida, April 25, 2017. Trump voters showed a willingness to trust...more

Barber Andrew Ciresi (R) cuts Domenico Brienza's hair as he speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Pinellas County, Florida, April 25, 2017. Trump voters showed a willingness to trust the president almost implicitly, saw him as a tireless worker, and appreciated his efforts to secure the border and curb immigration. They had little interest in the in-fighting between his senior aides in the White House. REUTERS/Steve Nesius
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Gary Baker, 64, trims his hedge in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. Northampton County voted for Obama in 2008 and 2012, but Trump in 2016. REUTERS/Mark Makela

Gary Baker, 64, trims his hedge in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. Northampton County voted for Obama in 2008 and 2012, but Trump in 2016. REUTERS/Mark Makela

Gary Baker, 64, trims his hedge in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. Northampton County voted for Obama in 2008 and 2012, but Trump in 2016. REUTERS/Mark Makela
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Milton Carter, 57, speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, April 24, 2017.  REUTERS/Julia Rendleman

Milton Carter, 57, speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Julia Rendleman

Milton Carter, 57, speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Julia Rendleman
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Attorney Karen Mayer speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Pinellas County, Florida, U.S., April 24, 2017. "Maybe sometimes I question what's going on," said Mayer, 47, "but at the same time, I have faith that he has a strong team."   REUTERS/Steve Nesius

Attorney Karen Mayer speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Pinellas County, Florida, U.S., April 24, 2017. "Maybe sometimes I question what's going on," said Mayer, 47, "but at the...more

Attorney Karen Mayer speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Pinellas County, Florida, U.S., April 24, 2017. "Maybe sometimes I question what's going on," said Mayer, 47, "but at the same time, I have faith that he has a strong team." REUTERS/Steve Nesius
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Steve Hammel, 58, a retired school teacher, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela

Steve Hammel, 58, a retired school teacher, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela

Steve Hammel, 58, a retired school teacher, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
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Eric Earhart speaks about Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, that flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Julie Rendleman

Eric Earhart speaks about Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, that flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Julie Rendleman

Eric Earhart speaks about Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, that flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Julie Rendleman
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Michael Ford, 35, a pet shop owner, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela

Michael Ford, 35, a pet shop owner, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela

Michael Ford, 35, a pet shop owner, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
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Rob McCann, 48, a realtor, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. "I think he's finding out that he can't follow through on all his talk," McCann said. "Internationally, I think he's creating more tensions than solutions."  REUTERS/Mark Makela

Rob McCann, 48, a realtor, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. "I think he's finding out that he can't follow through on all his talk," McCann said. "Internationally, I think he's creating more tensions than...more

Rob McCann, 48, a realtor, voted for President Trump, in Northampton, Pennsylvania, April 24, 2017. "I think he's finding out that he can't follow through on all his talk," McCann said. "Internationally, I think he's creating more tensions than solutions." REUTERS/Mark Makela
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Karen Seamster, 56, speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Julia Rendleman

Karen Seamster, 56, speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Julia Rendleman

Karen Seamster, 56, speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Gates County, North Carolina, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Julia Rendleman
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Ross Hood speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Macomb County, Michigan, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Ross Hood speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Macomb County, Michigan, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Ross Hood speaks about Trump in the county which flipped from voting for Barack Obama in 2012 to backing Trump in Macomb County, Michigan, April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
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