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Cyber warfare heats up

Saturday, June 18, 2011 - 02:05

June 17 - Consumers, companies, and governments face increase risks as new avenues in cyberspace, including mobile applications and cloud computing, create new opportunities for hackers and criminals. Jill Bennett reports.

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New avenues in cyberspace, from personal banking to shopping to checking health records, have created cyber warfare. Cybersecurity expert Tom Kellermann, who serves on the board of the International Cyber Security Protection Alliance: SOUNDBITE: TOM KELLERMANN, BOARD MEMBER, INTERNATIONAL CYBER SECURITY PROTECTION ALLIANCE (ENGLISH) SAYING: "If you have a significant brand presence globally you will be targeted whether it's for notoriety, extortion, financial gain, intellectual property, theft, the reason for that is there has been an explosion of hacking activity because there is an arsenal of weaponry out there that any neophyte can essentially download and become a true hacker." 360,000 Citigroup accounts were hacked in May. The International Monetary Fund was attacked and, Gmail accounts were targeted at Google. Sony, and defense contractor Lockheed Martin join a long list of companies recently attacked. The latest high profile victims: the public websites of the Central Intelligence Agency and the US Senate - whose committees are drafting legislation to create security safeguards. Senator Robert Menendez of New Jersey: SOUNDBITE: SENATOR ROBERT MENENDEZ (DEMOCRAT-NEW JERSEY), WROTE CYBERSECURITY LEGISLATION, (ENGLISH) SAYING: "What we want is to have the wherewithal to be ahead of the curve because right now I personally believe we are behind the curve and we can not afford that as a country." The proposed Senate legislation would also push for more collaboration between the government and the private sector. Bernie Meyerson, VP of Innovation at IBM Corporation: SOUNDBITE: BERNIE MEYERSON, VICE PRESIDENT OF INNOVATION, IBM (ENGLISH) SAYING: "There is always a chance, the random chance, that someone will find a hole in the fence whether it's our hole or some other software provider it doesn't matter, but the fact of the matter is you make it agonizingly painful to get through that fence, that's all you can do." The fear is hackers and criminals are moving at a faster speed in cyberspace than the government and the companies that control the private data. The continued push into mobile applications and cloud computing makes cybersecurity that much more of a concern. Jill Bennett, Reuters

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Cyber warfare heats up

Saturday, June 18, 2011 - 02:05