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Rebekah Brooks quits

Saturday, July 16, 2011 - 01:45

July 15 - Rupert Murdoch's most senior newspaper executive in Britain Rebekah Brooks has resigned as chief executive of News International, yielding to political and investor pressure. Matt Cowan reports.

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Rupert Murdoch's close confidante Rebekah Brooks has resigned her post as chief executive of News Corp's British newspaper unit. She'd previously served as the editor of both the scandal-hit News of the World and Sun tabloids. Her decision came after News Corp's second-biggest shareholder, Saudi billionaire Prince Alwa-leed bin Talal Alsaud told BBC's Newsnight programme he was concerned over her role. SOUNDBITE: Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Alsaud News Corp. Shareholder saying (English)" "If the indications are her involvement in this matter is explicit, for sure she has to go, you bet she has to go. You bet she has to go. Ethics to me is very important, definitely. I will not tolerate to deal with a company that has a lady or a man that has any sliver of doubt on her or his integrity." Brooks will still join Rupert and James Murdoch at a parliamentary hearing into the scandal at the News of the World on Tuesday. James Murdoch, the chairman of News International, hailed her as one of the outstanding editors of her generation. British Prime Minister David Cameron, who'd been a friend, welcomed the decision, as did opposition leader Ed Miliband. SOUNDBITE: Ed Miliband, Leader Of The Opposition, saying (English) "Well, I'm pleased that Rebekah Brooks has finally accepted responsibility for what happened on her watch as editor of the News of the World - the hacking of the phones of Milly Dowler, for example. But, as I said when I called for her resignation ten days ago, this isn't just about one individual. It's about the culture of an organisation. And when Rupert Murdoch says that News International have handled these allegations extremely well I think people up and down the country will be thinking that really beggars belief. He should be apologising to the victims of phone hacking. And I hope when he goes before the Select Committee next Tuesday, he starts taking some responsibility for what happened in his organisation." Former deputy Prime Minister John Prescott hailed the news in the House of Lords. SOUNDBITE: John Prescott, Former UK Deputy Prime Minister saying (English) : "I'm glad she's gone today, it's a step towards a decent and responsible journalism in this country." In hoping to turn a page on the whole sorry phone hacking affair, News Corp is planning to run a full page ads in UK newspapers over the weekend saying just that - sorry. Matt Cowan, Reuters

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Rebekah Brooks quits

Saturday, July 16, 2011 - 01:45