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Chemical-free technology turns sea water into drinking water

Monday, December 05, 2011 - 01:35

Dec. 5 - A chemical-free desalination facility, developed in Israel, allows a cheaper and more eco-friendly production of drinking water, according to its developers. The transportable system could soon be producing as much as half of the country's domestic water needs. Joanne Nicholson reports.

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It will bring drinking water to half of households in Israel, and has the power to transform the way even the remotest of places gain access to it. This new portable plant has harnessed the technology to turn salt water in to fresh, and its creators say it won't harm the eco-system. Fredi Lokiec is an executive with the company, IDE: (SOUNDBITE) (English) FREDI LOKIEC, IDE'S EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT FOR SPECIAL PROJECTS, SAYING: "IDE brought to the industry something that is really new and this facility we don't use any type of chemicals. So it's completely green -- that's the name, Pro Green -- environmentally friendly." The method the team uses is 'reverse osmosis'. Producing fresh water in this way isn't new, but what sets this apart from the others are the environmentally friendly biofilters, developed by the company. (SOUNDBITE) (English) FREDI LOKIEC, IDE'S EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT FOR SPECIAL PROJECTS, SAYING: "We don't use any type of chemicals, so it's very economical, no ... without the troubles of handling chemicals and discharging them back into the environment. That's the difference and that's the beauty of this plant." Last year, in a country two-thirds arid, IDE opened the world's largest desalination plant in the coastal city of Hadera. Now construction of an even bigger one is underway, and that, says IDE, would address Israel's water supply problems. Joanne Nicholson, Reuters

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Chemical-free technology turns sea water into drinking water

Monday, December 05, 2011 - 01:35