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Jewish activists try to break into al-Aqsa compound, also known as the Temple Mount

Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 00:43

Far-right activists try to break into the closed compound after the shooting of an Israeli ultranationalist. Rough Cut (no reporter narration)

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ROUGH CUT (No reporter narration) Dozens of far right Israeli protesters scuffled with security forces on Thursday (October 30) as they tried to break into the compound after it was closed for Jewish and Muslim worshippers in the wake of the shooting of an Israeli ultranationalist. Four people were arrested when a group of chanting far-right activists attempted to storm the Mugrabi Gate near the Jewish Western Well, Israeli police said. No injuries were reported. "We are here to say that the government of Israel has failed. For many months, Jews are attacked in the Temple Mount, Jews are attacked in Jerusalem and the government is strong against Jews and weak against the terrorist and the Arab rioters," said Israeli settler leader Baruch Marzel. A Palestinian counter protest took place nearby, with Israeli-Arab leaders calling on Israel to open access to the holy compound. "Nothing justifying closing al-Aqsa mosque. It's a a collective punishment. It is to say and to prove that al-Aqsa is under occupation, al-Aqsa mosque is under occupation," said Israel-Arab lawmaker Ahmed Tibi standing near the Jerusalem Muslim Mufti. Yehuda Glick, a far-right Israeli activist and a member of the Temple Mount Faithful group was shot and wounded in Jerusalem on Wednesday (October 29) as he left a conference promoting a Jewish campaign to permit praying at the flashpoint Old City compound holy to both Jews and Muslims. After Glick was shot, far-right Jewish groups urged supporters to march on Al-Aqsa, on Thursday morning. In the early hours of Thursday Israeli police shot dead a 32-year-old Palestinian man suspected of trying to kill Glick, leading to fierce clashes in East Jerusalem and fears of a new Palestinian uprising. The holy site of Al-Aqsa, or Temple Mount, which is a central cause of the violence, was closed to all visitors as a security precaution - Muslims, Jews and all tourists - an act Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas denounced as "tantamount to a declaration of war". It was the first full closure of the site, venerated by both Jews and Muslims, in 14 years. Al-Aqsa mosque is considered the third holiest shrine in Islam and is located in a compound which Muslims refer to as the Noble Sanctuary and Jews call the Temple Mount, Judaism's most sacred site East Jerusalem, which was captured by Israel in the 1967 Middle East war and has been occupied since, has been a source of intense friction in recent months, especially around Silwan, which sits in the shadow of the Old City and Al-Aqsa.

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Jewish activists try to break into al-Aqsa compound, also known as the Temple Mount

Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 00:43