Reuters - Video

Edition: US | UK | IN | CN | JP

Video

Varied reaction of Muslim world to Paris attacks

Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 01:28

Reactions to Paris attacks in the U.S. and Pakistan highlight the varying reactions of Muslims around the world ot the Charlie Hebdo bloodshed. Julie Noce reports.

▲ Hide Transcript

View Transcript

The fatal attack on a weekly satirical newspaper in France has left Muslim leaders in the U.S. fearful of a hate-mongering backlash. Citing a rise in anti-Islamic rhetoric on social media, executives at the Council on American Islamic Relations say more needs to be done to prevent the increase of Islamophobia. (SOUNDBITE) (English) NIHAD AWAD, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND FOUNDER OF THE COUNCIL ON AMERICAN-ISLAMIC RELATIONS (CAIR), SAYING: "There is a feeling of normalization of Islamophobia, Islamophobia is becoming widespread in our society. We don't see leadership. We don't see political leadership, religious leadership or civic leadership that is willing to stand and push against hate. Hate mongering in America is becoming unfortunately accepted and this is not a problem only for Muslims. It is a problem for us as Americans." 12 people were killed when brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi opened fire at the weekly satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo. Another seige days later at a Jewish supermarket resulted in the deaths of four hostages. Reactions to the attacks has been wide ranging from Muslim communities around the world. In Pakistan's northwestern city of Peshawar, a group of about 30 people staged funeral services to celebrate the attackers, Said and Cherif Kouachi. Holding signs written in English there was no mistaking their opinions. Although the Pakistani government officially condemned the attacks, events like this illustrate the country's widely held conservative views of Islam.

Press CTRL+C (Windows), CMD+C (Mac), or long-press the URL below on your mobile device to copy the code

Varied reaction of Muslim world to Paris attacks

Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 01:28