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First journalist to report on death of Argentine prosecutor "threatened"

Thursday, February 19, 2015 - 00:44

The first journalist to report on the death of Argentine state prosecutor, Alberto Nisman, tells an Israeli news channel he fled Argentina after feeling threatened. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) The first journalist to report on the death of an Argentine state prosecutor, who was investigating the deadly 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires, said on Wednesday (February 18) that he had fled Argentina after feeling threatened. "Well, I don't have still the reason, the main reason why they were after me. But first I had, I met an intel officer who was pursuing me. And after that when I was fleeing, the official Twitter account of the government house, La Casa Rosada, which is like the White House, they published through their official Twitter account the details of my flight," Damian Pachter, a journalist with the Buenos Aires Herald, told Israel's i24News channel. "It was some kind of a message to me. We know where you are," he added. State prosecutor Alberto Nisman was found dead in his apartment late on January 18, a gunshot wound to his head and a 22 caliber pistol by his side along with a single shell casing. He had been scheduled to appear before Congress the following day to answer questions about his allegation that President Cristina Fernandez conspired to derail his investigation of the attack. His death and a storm of conspiracy theories around it have rocked Argentina. Argentina suspects rogue agents from its own intelligence services were behind Nisman's death. The government says Nisman's allegations and his death were linked to a power struggle at Argentina's intelligence agency and agents who had recently been fired. Argentine courts have accused a group of Iranians of planting the 1994 bomb, which killed 85 people. Nisman had claimed that President Fernandez opened a secret back channel to Iran to cover up Tehran's alleged involvement in the bombing and gain access to Iranian oil needed to help close Argentina's $7 billion per year energy deficit. Fernandez's government called the accusation absurd.

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First journalist to report on death of Argentine prosecutor "threatened"

Thursday, February 19, 2015 - 00:44