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"It's an extraordinary day": Tunisian Nobel Peace Prize winner

Friday, October 09, 2015 - 00:58

Tunisia's Wided Bouchamaoui, a member of the National Dialogue Quartet which won the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize, says the award is ''extraordinary'' for her country, its youth, and its women. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) Tunisia's National Dialogue Quartet won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for helping build democracy in the birthplace of the Arab Spring, an example of peaceful transition in a region otherwise struggling with violence and upheaval. The quartet of the Tunisian General Labour Union (UGTT), the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts (UTICA), the Tunisian Human Rights League (LTDH), and the Tunisian Order of Lawyers was formed in the summer of 2013. It helped support the democratization process when it was in danger of collapsing, the Norwegian Nobel committee said in its citation. "It's an extraordinary day as much as it is important for Tunisia. So on the consecration of this beautiful day to the Quartet, and the consecration also in addition, for the recognition of an organization just as important, the UTICA (Tunisia's Employers' Organization)," said ided Bouchamaoui, president of Tunisia's Employers' Organization (UTICA) and member of Tunisia's National Dialogue Quartet. "I place all my congratulations to the Tunisian youth and to the memory of those who were assassinated and who have done so much work for Tunisia. Of course, above all else, I'd say that, it's just as important for Tunisian women, I would like to say my group, more than just being the face of the patronage, I am a woman and I am proud to represent the women of Tunisia." With a new constitution, free elections and a compromise politics between Islamist and secular leaders, Tunisia has been held up as a model of how to make the transition to a democracy from dictatorship. The Nobel Peace Prize, worth 8 million Swedish crowns ($972,000), will be presented in Oslo on Dec. 10. The Norwegian Nobel Committee praised the quartet for providing an alternative, peaceful political process at a time when the country was on the brink of civil war.

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"It's an extraordinary day": Tunisian Nobel Peace Prize winner

Friday, October 09, 2015 - 00:58