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Protesters out in droves for Women's March on Washington

Sunday, January 22, 2017 - 02:06

''I'd like to see the rest of the country look like this town,'' says demonstrator Kate Norris who joined hundreds of thousands of women, supported by a smaller number of men, in the nation's capital to rally against U.S. President Donald Trump. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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ROUGH CUT (NO REPORTER NARRATION) STORY: The Women's March on Washington appeared to be larger than the crowds that turned out the previous day to witness President Donald Trump's inauguration on the steps of the U.S. Capitol. Organizers of the protest had told police they expected 200,000 people to attend, but the crowd looked substantially bigger than that, stretching for about a mile (1.6 km). Many women, some wearing pink hats, held signs of all sizes with phrases showing their distaste for Trump. Protesters like Kate Norris used humor for her large, vertical sign which read, "Super, callous, facist, racist, sexist, braggadocious." "I'd like to see the rest of the country look like this town. I'd like to see a lot of different colors everywhere I look in America. I'd like to see a place that is the home of the free," said Norris who traveled from North Carolina to be at the march. Other women came out to support the LGBT community, like Judy Tsai from Long Island, New York. "My wife and I have a two-year-old son and we're really worried about the future and what would happen if Trump were able to pass all the legislation that he's thinking of passing," said Tsai. Kaitlyn Mason said she was supporting "all women in totality", no matter their race. "And my grandma is 94 years old and she marched back in the civil rights marches back in the 50s and 60s, so I just wanted to do something that she once did," said Mason. The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom took place in 1963 and was attended by some 250,000 people. This year, organizers expected up to one million people to participate in the marches for a global display of unity. 100-year-old Ann Arbor didn't want to miss the march. She insisted her daughter bring her a day after her birthday. Eleanor Vale said she was visiting D.C. for Trump's inauguration and just wanted to visit the Lincoln Memorial. But she and her husband said they had no choice but to witness a show of solidarity against the man they voted for. "I happen to know Donald Trump from real estate in New York. I know who he is. I'm sure he's not going to have a racist attitude and try to implement it on a policy level. I'm confident," said Vale. As the march wrapped up, protesters walked around The Ellipse and shouted toward the White House. Thousands of others continue their march through downtown streets, clogging roads. At an intersection close to the White House, a group of Trump supporters on a trailer stopped in the middle of the road to angry yells. Protesters chanted, "Shame on you." Others yelled, "Donald Trump go away. Racist, sexist, anti-gay." Law enforcement officials pushed back the crowd and the trailer made its way down the street, stopped by angry crowds as it slowly made its way through intersections. Thousands of women also took to the streets of Sydney, London, Tokyo, New Delhi and other European and Asian cities in solidarity. Trump has angered many people with comments seen as demeaning to women, Mexicans and Muslims, and worried some abroad with his vow on Friday to put "America First."

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Protesters out in droves for Women's March on Washington

Sunday, January 22, 2017 - 02:06