March 29, 2019 / 5:44 PM / in 3 months

Anti-stall system active before Ethiopian 737 MAX crash -sources

WASHINGTON/PARIS, March 29 (Reuters) - An anti-stall system at the centre of a probe into the crash of a Boeing 737 MAX jetliner in Indonesia five months ago was also at play when an identical aircraft crashed in Ethiopia earlier this month, three people briefed on the matter said. Data pulled from the Ethiopian Airlines flight recorder suggests the so-called MCAS system, which pushes the nose of the jet downwards, had been activated before the jet ploughed into a field outside Addis Ababa on March 10, the people said, asking not to be identified.

Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration declined to comment on the readout, first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

It is the second related piece of evidence to emerge from the black boxes of Ethiopian flight 302 after an initial sample of data recovered by investigators in Paris 11 days ago suggested similar “angle of attack” readings to the first crash.

These initial airflow readings from the Ethiopian jet, first reported by Reuters, refer to stall-related information needed to trigger the automated nose-down MCAS system. (Reporting by David Shepardson, Tim Hepher, Editing by Sarah White)

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