June 24, 2020 / 3:09 PM / 15 days ago

Dun & Bradstreet looks to raise up to $1.38 billion in U.S. IPO

(Reuters) - U.S. business analytics firm Dun & Bradstreet said on Wednesday it was looking to raise up to $1.38 billion in its initial public offering (IPO), as the market for new listings roars back to life.

The coronavirus crisis, which had upended the financial markets, had slammed the brakes on market debuts for a while, but the appetite for new offerings is back up.

The company intends to offer 65.75 million shares in its IPO and has set a price range of $19-$21 per share, according to its regulatory filing here

The higher end of the target range gives the company a valuation of $8.41 billion.

The company also plans to issue a private placement of shares worth $400 million to certain buyers. The shares will be sold at 98.5% of the IPO price and the full proceeds from the placement, contingent on IPO completion, will go to Dun & Bradstreet.

The company intends to list its shares on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “DNB”.

The offering comes less than two years after an investor group, led by former Blackstone Group Inc (BX.N) dealmaker Chinh Chu, took Dun & Bradstreet private in a $6.9 billion deal.

The company provides businesses with data and analytics services and has more than 5,000 employees in North America, Europe and Asia, according to its website.

For the three months ended March 31, revenue more than doubled to $395.3 million, from a year earlier. Operating loss narrowed to $8.3 million from $203 million.

Reporting by C Nivedita; Editing by Shinjini Ganguli

0 : 0
  • narrow-browser-and-phone
  • medium-browser-and-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser
  • wide-browser-and-larger
  • medium-browser-and-landscape-tablet
  • medium-wide-browser-and-larger
  • above-phone
  • portrait-tablet-and-above
  • above-portrait-tablet
  • landscape-tablet-and-above
  • landscape-tablet-and-medium-wide-browser
  • portrait-tablet-and-below
  • landscape-tablet-and-below