Edition:
India

Paul Wallace

Commentary: Lessons in forgiveness, a century after World War One

09 Nov 2018

World leaders including U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin will gather in Paris on Sunday to commemorate the armistice of Nov. 11, 1918. The centenary is a natural occasion to reflect upon abiding lessons for today from the tragic and seemingly pointless carnage of the “Great War.” The central question is why the peace that followed proved to be no more than a fragile and unstable intermission between two global conflicts – and what modern-day Europe can learn from the mistakes of those interwar years.

COLUMN-Lessons in forgiveness, a century after World War One

09 Nov 2018

Nov 8 World leaders including U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin will gather in Paris on Sunday to commemorate the armistice of Nov. 11, 1918. The centenary is a natural occasion to reflect upon abiding lessons for today from the tragic and seemingly pointless carnage of the “Great War.” The central question is why the peace that followed proved to be no more than a fragile and unstable intermission between two global conflicts – and what modern-day Europe can learn from the mistakes of those interwar years.

Commentary: Why Britain’s economy will be more European after Brexit

26 Oct 2018

The black hole that is Brexit is now exerting its gravitational pull on the UK budget. Beset by uncertainties about reaching a deal with the EU, chancellor of the exchequer Philip Hammond is expected to stall when he presents his plans to the House of Commons on Oct. 29 – doing as little as possible. But that will only postpone a looming confrontation with fiscal reality, which will dash Brexiter hopes and confound European fears of Britain turning into a low-tax competitor outside the EU. Instead the British state will turn more European with higher levels of tax and spending.

COLUMN-Why Britain’s economy will be more European after Brexit

26 Oct 2018

Oct 25 The black hole that is Brexit is now exerting its gravitational pull on the UK budget. Beset by uncertainties about reaching a deal with the EU, chancellor of the exchequer Philip Hammond is expected to stall when he presents his plans to the House of Commons on Oct. 29 – doing as little as possible. But that will only postpone a looming confrontation with fiscal reality, which will dash Brexiter hopes and confound European fears of Britain turning into a low-tax competitor outside the EU. Instead the British state will turn more European with higher levels of tax and spending.

Commentary: Why the EU should cut Brexit Britain a break

19 Sep 2018

In scarcely more than six months Britain will leave the European Union. That departure on March 29, 2019 could be toxic and disruptive through a failure to reach a deal, hurting Britain most of all, but the EU as well. Or there could be an amicable parting of the ways. For this to happen European leaders meeting in Salzburg this week must now give some ground as the negotiations enter their final stage.

Commentary: Don’t cheer Greece’s bailout exit just yet

21 Aug 2018

For once Europe has an exit to celebrate rather than dread. On Monday, more than eight years after its first euro zone bailout, Greece left its third financial rescue program. This is a welcome Grexit, but before popping open the champagne it’s important to remember that Athens remains in thrall to its European creditors, who have failed to put the Greek economy on a sustainable footing.

COLUMN-Commentary: Don’t cheer Greece’s bailout exit just yet

21 Aug 2018

Aug 20 For once Europe has an exit to celebrate rather than dread. On Monday, more than eight years after its first euro zone bailout, Greece left its third financial rescue program. This is a welcome Grexit, but before popping open the champagne it’s important to remember that Athens remains in thrall to its European creditors, who have failed to put the Greek economy on a sustainable footing.

Commentary: Bank of England governors are too powerful for their own good

11 May 2018

Mark Carney, the Canadian hailed as a rock-star central banker when he became governor of the Bank of England in 2013, has only a year to go before he leaves office. Already the race to succeed him is under way. But is this a job that any one person should have?

Commentary: Why Brexit Britain should look to Turkey

25 Apr 2018

In the long learning curve of Brexit a handful of countries outside the European Union have become shorthand for Britain’s options. Norway offers a continuing place in the single market for those who want the softest form of leaving the EU. Canada stands for the free-trade agreement broadly on offer from the union. Now it’s Turkey’s turn to enter the Brexit lexicon – thanks to its customs union with the bloc.

Commentary: The real reason to worry about Italy’s election

01 Mar 2018

Ahead of Italy’s election on March 4, investors are most afraid of political change. They worry that the government may succumb to the populist forces that France and the Netherlands dodged last year. Such fears are misplaced. Italian political risk is overhyped. By contrast there is undue complacency about Italy’s vulnerable economy, the third biggest in the euro area.

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