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India

Peter Apps

COLUMN-China, others aim to make the best of coronavirus geopoliticals: Peter Apps

20 Mar 2020

LONDON, March 20 As Serbia's European Union neighbours closed their borders and halted many medical exports, President Aleksandar Vucic made an appeal https://www.euractiv.com/section/coronavirus/news/serbia-turns-to-china-due-to-lack-of-eu-solidarity-on-coronavirus. "Serbia now turns its eyes to China," he said. "All my personal hopes are focused and directed toward China and its president."

Column: Amid virus outbreak, disinformation and international strains

16 Mar 2020

LONDON As the coronavirus outbreak ravaged Iran on March 5, the new commander of its Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps announced that the country was "engaged in a biological battle". The virus, Hossein Salami told the semi-official ISNA news agency, "might be the product of an American biological (attack) which spread first in China and then in the rest of the world".

COLUMN-Amid coronavirus, Trump, Modi and Netanyahu leap to seal their borders: Peter Apps

12 Mar 2020

LONDON, March 12 The week started with coronavirus prompting Saudi Arabia and Russia to tear up the rule book on oil exports to start a savage price war. Wednesday night saw President Donald Trump go even further in announcing a ban on transatlantic travel from mainland Europe for non-Americans. While the ban is initially intended to last a month, the knock-on effects on a globe already increasingly obsessed by borders and restrictions on trade and movement will last much longer.

COLUMN-With oil price slump, coronavirus unleashes economic warfare: Peter Apps

09 Mar 2020

LONDON, March 9 A new week of the coronavirus crisis is beginning with another unexpected consequence – an oil price crash driven by the outbreak of relatively unrestricted economic warfare between Saudi Arabia, Russia and the West.

COLUMN-As coronavirus spikes, so does global instability: Peter Apps

28 Feb 2020

LONDON, Feb 28 As the coronavirus outbreak turns global, stock markets and world populations are waking up to the threat of a global pandemic. That, though, hasn't been the only disturbing global news this week. In the Middle East and Asia in particular, military tensions are on the rise – and major countries seem ever less bothered about taking off the gloves.

COLUMN-Fears over coronavirus threaten globalisation rule book: Peter Apps

21 Feb 2020

LONDON, Feb 21 As the Ebola virus ravaged West Africa in 2014, civilian air traffic in and out of the most affected countries of Sierra Leone and Liberia almost completely ceased. That decision, however, was not taken by international health officials. Instead, it came from airline cleaners and other staff, who simply refused to have anything to do with planes in and out of the region.

COLUMN-Turkey-Syria crisis points to risky post-American Mideast: Peter Apps

13 Feb 2020

LONDON, Feb 13 In parts of Syria dubbed "de-escalation zones" by the government, what could yet prove a new regional conflict is escalating fast.

COLUMN-With virus outbreak, China showcases micro drone surveillance: Peter Apps

03 Feb 2020

LONDON, Feb 3 Sometime last week, a small group of Chinese residents were sitting outside in the town of Chengdu. A small drone approached them, hovered nearby and began to speak.

In Davos, Trump frames climate change as global culture war: Peter Apps

22 Jan 2020

LONDON In Davos on Tuesday, President Donald Trump pledged the United States to a major global project to plant a trillion trees worldwide in the next decade. In almost any previous administration, that announcement would have been the centerpiece of the president's speech to the World Economic Forum, focusing this year on climate change amid Australia's wildfires and faster than expected progress toward renewable energy generation.

COLUMN-In Davos, Trump frames climate change as global culture war: Peter Apps

22 Jan 2020

LONDON, Jan 22 In Davos on Tuesday, President Donald Trump pledged the United States to a major global project to plant a trillion trees worldwide in the next decade. In almost any previous administration, that announcement would have been the centrepiece of the president's speech to the World Economic Forum, focusing this year on climate change amid Australia's wildfires and faster than expected progress towards renewable energy generation.

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