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Pictures | Wed Sep 19, 2018 | 7:45pm IST

Aerial icebergs

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 18, 2018. New NASA data on water temperature, depth and salinity has helped explain why the rate of ice loss at northwestern Greenland s Tracy glacier is almost four times the rate of the nearby Heilprin glacier. That s because the fresh water flowing from Tracy, which sits on deeper bedrock, is mixing with a layer of warm, salty water off Greenland s coast, accelerating the melting process, the researchers found. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 18, 2018. New NASA data on water temperature, depth and salinity has helped explain why the rate of ice loss at northwestern Greenland s Tracy glacier is almost four times the...more

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 18, 2018. New NASA data on water temperature, depth and salinity has helped explain why the rate of ice loss at northwestern Greenland s Tracy glacier is almost four times the rate of the nearby Heilprin glacier. That s because the fresh water flowing from Tracy, which sits on deeper bedrock, is mixing with a layer of warm, salty water off Greenland s coast, accelerating the melting process, the researchers found. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. Rising seas threaten low-lying cities, islands and industries worldwide. But projections for how high and how soon the rise will come vary wildly in part because scientists lack clarity on how fast warming oceans are melting polar ice sheets. The uncertainty confounds the preparations of governments and businesses and fuels the arguments of climate-change skeptics. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. Rising seas threaten low-lying cities, islands and industries worldwide. But projections for how high and how soon the rise will come vary wildly in part because...more

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. Rising seas threaten low-lying cities, islands and industries worldwide. But projections for how high and how soon the rise will come vary wildly in part because scientists lack clarity on how fast warming oceans are melting polar ice sheets. The uncertainty confounds the preparations of governments and businesses and fuels the arguments of climate-change skeptics. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 19, 2018. Better projections would be invaluable to governments worldwide. Britain s Environment Agency, for instance, foresees upgrades to a barrier on the Thames River to protect London against 35.4 inches of sea level rise by 2100, but could modify the plans to account for a catastrophic 8.85 feet. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 19, 2018. Better projections would be invaluable to governments worldwide. Britain s Environment Agency, for instance, foresees upgrades to a barrier on the Thames River to...more

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 19, 2018. Better projections would be invaluable to governments worldwide. Britain s Environment Agency, for instance, foresees upgrades to a barrier on the Thames River to protect London against 35.4 inches of sea level rise by 2100, but could modify the plans to account for a catastrophic 8.85 feet. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 18, 2018. A 2016 study in a journal of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences predicted that an event comparable to Superstorm Sandy, which flooded large swaths of the New York region in 2012, would be up to 17 times more likely by 2100 if seas rise by 3.28 feet. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 18, 2018. A 2016 study in a journal of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences predicted that an event comparable to Superstorm Sandy, which flooded large swaths of the New York...more

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 18, 2018. A 2016 study in a journal of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences predicted that an event comparable to Superstorm Sandy, which flooded large swaths of the New York region in 2012, would be up to 17 times more likely by 2100 if seas rise by 3.28 feet. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. Some of Greenland s glaciers are disappearing more rapidly than others, and understanding why is a key goal of NASA s mission. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. Some of Greenland s glaciers are disappearing more rapidly than others, and understanding why is a key goal of NASA s mission. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. Some of Greenland s glaciers are disappearing more rapidly than others, and understanding why is a key goal of NASA s mission. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. NASA s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) project is a five-year, $30 million effort aimed at improving sea level rise projections by understanding how warming oceans are melting ice sheets from below - the most ambitious research on the subject to date. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. NASA s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) project is a five-year, $30 million effort aimed at improving sea level rise projections by understanding how warming oceans are...more

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. NASA s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) project is a five-year, $30 million effort aimed at improving sea level rise projections by understanding how warming oceans are melting ice sheets from below - the most ambitious research on the subject to date. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. Many more Greenland glaciers are in similar trouble. Researchers discovered last year that 67 glaciers were connected to the warmer, deeper layer at least 656 feet below sea level   at least twice as many as previously known. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. Many more Greenland glaciers are in similar trouble. Researchers discovered last year that 67 glaciers were connected to the warmer, deeper layer at least 656 feet...more

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. Many more Greenland glaciers are in similar trouble. Researchers discovered last year that 67 glaciers were connected to the warmer, deeper layer at least 656 feet below sea level at least twice as many as previously known. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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