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Pictures | Wed Jan 31, 2018 | 12:10am IST

As immigration debate rages, 'Dreamers' await their fate

DACA recipient Javier Hernandez Kistte, 27, poses outside his home in Los Angeles. Hernandez Kistte is a UC Irvine graduate who now works for a visual effects company. He came to the U.S. from Mexico City when he was eight years old.   


REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

DACA recipient Javier Hernandez Kistte, 27, poses outside his home in Los Angeles. Hernandez Kistte is a UC Irvine graduate who now works for a visual effects company. He came to the U.S. from Mexico City when he was eight years old. ...more

DACA recipient Javier Hernandez Kistte, 27, poses outside his home in Los Angeles. Hernandez Kistte is a UC Irvine graduate who now works for a visual effects company. He came to the U.S. from Mexico City when he was eight years old. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Hernandez Kistte said that DACA allowed him and his brother to finish their degrees by allowing them to work to pay for tuition.

 REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Hernandez Kistte said that DACA allowed him and his brother to finish their degrees by allowing them to work to pay for tuition. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Hernandez Kistte said that DACA allowed him and his brother to finish their degrees by allowing them to work to pay for tuition. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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"My parents are still undocumented and as a family we struggle with the anxiety that it's possible for them to get deported at any moment. That anxiety has now risen with the uncertainty that me and my brother might return to having an undocumented status... " he said. 


REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

"My parents are still undocumented and as a family we struggle with the anxiety that it's possible for them to get deported at any moment. That anxiety has now risen with the uncertainty that me and my brother might return to having an undocumented...more

"My parents are still undocumented and as a family we struggle with the anxiety that it's possible for them to get deported at any moment. That anxiety has now risen with the uncertainty that me and my brother might return to having an undocumented status... " he said. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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"It's not only about us. I've heard of people who are willing to negotiate terms that will give us the right to be here, give us DACA, but will make life a living nightmare for other people and I don't want that." 


 REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

"It's not only about us. I've heard of people who are willing to negotiate terms that will give us the right to be here, give us DACA, but will make life a living nightmare for other people and I don't want that." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

"It's not only about us. I've heard of people who are willing to negotiate terms that will give us the right to be here, give us DACA, but will make life a living nightmare for other people and I don't want that." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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DACA recipient Barbara Hernandez (C), 26, participates in a protest for a clean Dream Act, in Anaheim, California. Hernandez graduated from Orange Coast Community College. She came to the U.S. from Mexico City when she was six years old. 


REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

DACA recipient Barbara Hernandez (C), 26, participates in a protest for a clean Dream Act, in Anaheim, California. Hernandez graduated from Orange Coast Community College. She came to the U.S. from Mexico City when she was six years old....more

DACA recipient Barbara Hernandez (C), 26, participates in a protest for a clean Dream Act, in Anaheim, California. Hernandez graduated from Orange Coast Community College. She came to the U.S. from Mexico City when she was six years old. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Hernandez (C) helps plan a protest for a clean Dream Act at her home in Santa Ana, California. She worked as a special education teacher until she chose to quit after the repeal of DACA. "That was the most rewarding and loving job I have ever had. But with this administration and the repeal of DACA... I was very scared. I was thrown into this panic stage; I was depressed... I'm concerned about how DACA recipients are feeling, their mental state... I would like to see permanent protection for not only us, DACA recipients, but for all eleven million immigrants." 


REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Hernandez (C) helps plan a protest for a clean Dream Act at her home in Santa Ana, California. She worked as a special education teacher until she chose to quit after the repeal of DACA. "That was the most rewarding and loving job I have ever had....more

Hernandez (C) helps plan a protest for a clean Dream Act at her home in Santa Ana, California. She worked as a special education teacher until she chose to quit after the repeal of DACA. "That was the most rewarding and loving job I have ever had. But with this administration and the repeal of DACA... I was very scared. I was thrown into this panic stage; I was depressed... I'm concerned about how DACA recipients are feeling, their mental state... I would like to see permanent protection for not only us, DACA recipients, but for all eleven million immigrants." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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DACA recipient Martha Valenzuela, 23, leaves her office at lunchtime in Orange, California. Valenzuela is a Cal State Fullerton graduate who came to the U.S. from Sinaloa, Mexico, when she was two years old. Valenzuela's mother crossed the Arizona desert to join her and her father in the U.S.


REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

DACA recipient Martha Valenzuela, 23, leaves her office at lunchtime in Orange, California. Valenzuela is a Cal State Fullerton graduate who came to the U.S. from Sinaloa, Mexico, when she was two years old. Valenzuela's mother crossed the Arizona...more

DACA recipient Martha Valenzuela, 23, leaves her office at lunchtime in Orange, California. Valenzuela is a Cal State Fullerton graduate who came to the U.S. from Sinaloa, Mexico, when she was two years old. Valenzuela's mother crossed the Arizona desert to join her and her father in the U.S. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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When she heard about Trump rescinding DACA, Valenzuela said: "It broke me... It's traumatizing... because I've lived in this country for 21 years... We all want a pathway to citizenship. We all want permanent protection for us and our families... The reason this country labeled us as 'Dreamers' is because we want something � as if that dream is unattainable. No, If we can dream it, we can achieve it... It takes guts to have a dream and it takes guts to fight for it."  

REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

When she heard about Trump rescinding DACA, Valenzuela said: "It broke me... It's traumatizing... because I've lived in this country for 21 years... We all want a pathway to citizenship. We all want permanent protection for us and our families... The...more

When she heard about Trump rescinding DACA, Valenzuela said: "It broke me... It's traumatizing... because I've lived in this country for 21 years... We all want a pathway to citizenship. We all want permanent protection for us and our families... The reason this country labeled us as 'Dreamers' is because we want something � as if that dream is unattainable. No, If we can dream it, we can achieve it... It takes guts to have a dream and it takes guts to fight for it." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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DACA recipient Brian Caballero, 25, walks out of the ambulance in which he lives on his college campus in Pomona, California. Caballero is an electrical engineering undergraduate student in his last year of Cal Poly Pomona University. 


REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

DACA recipient Brian Caballero, 25, walks out of the ambulance in which he lives on his college campus in Pomona, California. Caballero is an electrical engineering undergraduate student in his last year of Cal Poly Pomona University. REUTERS/Lucy...more

DACA recipient Brian Caballero, 25, walks out of the ambulance in which he lives on his college campus in Pomona, California. Caballero is an electrical engineering undergraduate student in his last year of Cal Poly Pomona University. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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He came to the U.S. when he was five or six years old from Guadalajara, Mexico. 


REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

He came to the U.S. when he was five or six years old from Guadalajara, Mexico. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

He came to the U.S. when he was five or six years old from Guadalajara, Mexico. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Caballero said he was worried about losing DACA: "When I finally graduate, not being able to be employed, terrifies me." 


 REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Caballero said he was worried about losing DACA: "When I finally graduate, not being able to be employed, terrifies me." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Caballero said he was worried about losing DACA: "When I finally graduate, not being able to be employed, terrifies me." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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"The vast majority of people who are unauthorized in this country are here to have a better life... the majority of people are like me: here, trying to seek an education and just trying to improve their lives." 

REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

"The vast majority of people who are unauthorized in this country are here to have a better life... the majority of people are like me: here, trying to seek an education and just trying to improve their lives." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

"The vast majority of people who are unauthorized in this country are here to have a better life... the majority of people are like me: here, trying to seek an education and just trying to improve their lives." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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DACA recipient Karla Estrada, 26, prepares dinner at her apartment in Los Angeles. Estrada is a UCLA graduate who works as a paralegal assistant while preparing to attend law school. She came to the U.S. from Morelos, Mexico, when she was five years old.

REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

DACA recipient Karla Estrada, 26, prepares dinner at her apartment in Los Angeles. Estrada is a UCLA graduate who works as a paralegal assistant while preparing to attend law school. She came to the U.S. from Morelos, Mexico, when she was five years...more

DACA recipient Karla Estrada, 26, prepares dinner at her apartment in Los Angeles. Estrada is a UCLA graduate who works as a paralegal assistant while preparing to attend law school. She came to the U.S. from Morelos, Mexico, when she was five years old. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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"DACA has always been very problematic and temporary � it's not an ideal thing. It has given us the liberty to work, legally, without fear that in three months we're going to get fired because we have no social [security number]. I have to take care of myself in this country but I also have to take care of my mom and dad and brother in Mexico... The thing that scares me the most is not being able to take care of my family."


REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

"DACA has always been very problematic and temporary � it's not an ideal thing. It has given us the liberty to work, legally, without fear that in three months we're going to get fired because we have no social [security number]. I have to take care...more

"DACA has always been very problematic and temporary � it's not an ideal thing. It has given us the liberty to work, legally, without fear that in three months we're going to get fired because we have no social [security number]. I have to take care of myself in this country but I also have to take care of my mom and dad and brother in Mexico... The thing that scares me the most is not being able to take care of my family." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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I think it's important for all DACA recipients to understand that DACA or any type of legislation, although very beneficial... does not define who you are as a human being and does not give you any more or any less dignity than you already have," Estrada said. 


REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

I think it's important for all DACA recipients to understand that DACA or any type of legislation, although very beneficial... does not define who you are as a human being and does not give you any more or any less dignity than you already have,"...more

I think it's important for all DACA recipients to understand that DACA or any type of legislation, although very beneficial... does not define who you are as a human being and does not give you any more or any less dignity than you already have," Estrada said. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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