Edition:
India
Pictures | Wed Sep 26, 2012 | 12:40pm IST

Eating in India: Paan

<p>Owner Ram Soni shows a paan, a betel nut-based chewable stimulant, at his jail cell-themed shop decorated with hangman's nooses in Ahmedabad July 10, 2012.  REUTERS/Amit Dave </p>

Owner Ram Soni shows a paan, a betel nut-based chewable stimulant, at his jail cell-themed shop decorated with hangman's nooses in Ahmedabad July 10, 2012. REUTERS/Amit Dave

Owner Ram Soni shows a paan, a betel nut-based chewable stimulant, at his jail cell-themed shop decorated with hangman's nooses in Ahmedabad July 10, 2012. REUTERS/Amit Dave

Close
1 / 10
<p>Owner Ram Soni (2nd L) prepares paan, a betel nut-based chewable stimulant, at his jail cell-themed shop decorated with hangman's nooses in Ahmedabad July 10, 2012.  REUTERS/Amit Dave </p>

Owner Ram Soni (2nd L) prepares paan, a betel nut-based chewable stimulant, at his jail cell-themed shop decorated with hangman's nooses in Ahmedabad July 10, 2012. REUTERS/Amit Dave

Owner Ram Soni (2nd L) prepares paan, a betel nut-based chewable stimulant, at his jail cell-themed shop decorated with hangman's nooses in Ahmedabad July 10, 2012. REUTERS/Amit Dave

Close
2 / 10
<p>Customers wait to buy paan, a betel nut-based chewable stimulant, at a jail cell-themed shop decorated with hangman's nooses in Ahmedabad July 10, 2012. The shop's owner Ram Soni says he wants to send a message about the dangers of tobacco, a common ingredient in paan. He offers a 2 rupee ($0.02) discount to customers who choose a tobacco-free version. His paan sell for between 5 rupees ($0.09) to 25 rupees ($0.45) per item.  REUTERS/Amit Dave </p>

Customers wait to buy paan, a betel nut-based chewable stimulant, at a jail cell-themed shop decorated with hangman's nooses in Ahmedabad July 10, 2012. The shop's owner Ram Soni says he wants to send a message about the dangers of tobacco, a common...more

Customers wait to buy paan, a betel nut-based chewable stimulant, at a jail cell-themed shop decorated with hangman's nooses in Ahmedabad July 10, 2012. The shop's owner Ram Soni says he wants to send a message about the dangers of tobacco, a common ingredient in paan. He offers a 2 rupee ($0.02) discount to customers who choose a tobacco-free version. His paan sell for between 5 rupees ($0.09) to 25 rupees ($0.45) per item. REUTERS/Amit Dave

Close
3 / 10
<p>A boy runs past a wall stained with tobacco spit along a street in New Delhi August 26, 2012.  REUTERS/Mansi Thapliyal </p>

A boy runs past a wall stained with tobacco spit along a street in New Delhi August 26, 2012. REUTERS/Mansi Thapliyal

A boy runs past a wall stained with tobacco spit along a street in New Delhi August 26, 2012. REUTERS/Mansi Thapliyal

Close
4 / 10
<p>A man is reflected in a mirror as he waits to buy 'paan' a chewable betel leaf preparation at a roadside stall at the end of the sixth day of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan in the old quarters of Mumbai September 7, 2008. REUTERS/Arko Datta </p>

A man is reflected in a mirror as he waits to buy 'paan' a chewable betel leaf preparation at a roadside stall at the end of the sixth day of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan in the old quarters of Mumbai September 7, 2008. REUTERS/Arko Datta more

A man is reflected in a mirror as he waits to buy 'paan' a chewable betel leaf preparation at a roadside stall at the end of the sixth day of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan in the old quarters of Mumbai September 7, 2008. REUTERS/Arko Datta

Close
5 / 10
<p>A betel vendor waits for the customers as he squats on a pavement in the old quarters of Delhi June 21, 2009. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi </p>

A betel vendor waits for the customers as he squats on a pavement in the old quarters of Delhi June 21, 2009. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

A betel vendor waits for the customers as he squats on a pavement in the old quarters of Delhi June 21, 2009. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

Close
6 / 10
<p>A farmer arranges betel leaves in a basket in  Orissa, June 22, 2011. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash </p>

A farmer arranges betel leaves in a basket in Orissa, June 22, 2011. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash

A farmer arranges betel leaves in a basket in Orissa, June 22, 2011. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash

Close
7 / 10
<p>A labourer dries betel nuts at a cottage industry in Choto Shalkumar village, about 160 km (99 miles) north of  Siliguri, February 21, 2010. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri </p>

A labourer dries betel nuts at a cottage industry in Choto Shalkumar village, about 160 km (99 miles) north of Siliguri, February 21, 2010. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

A labourer dries betel nuts at a cottage industry in Choto Shalkumar village, about 160 km (99 miles) north of Siliguri, February 21, 2010. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Close
8 / 10
<p>Labourers cut betel nuts at a cottage industry in Choto Shalkumar village, about 160 km (99 miles) north of Siliguri, February 21, 2010.  REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri </p>

Labourers cut betel nuts at a cottage industry in Choto Shalkumar village, about 160 km (99 miles) north of Siliguri, February 21, 2010. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Labourers cut betel nuts at a cottage industry in Choto Shalkumar village, about 160 km (99 miles) north of Siliguri, February 21, 2010. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Close
9 / 10
<p>A farmer works at a betel leaf farm at Kumarghat, about 140 km (87 miles) north of Agartala, June 27, 2007. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey </p>

A farmer works at a betel leaf farm at Kumarghat, about 140 km (87 miles) north of Agartala, June 27, 2007. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey

A farmer works at a betel leaf farm at Kumarghat, about 140 km (87 miles) north of Agartala, June 27, 2007. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey

Close
10 / 10

Next Slideshows

Wheelchair dancing

Disabled dancers compete in the First Regional Dance Competition on Wheelchair Sports in Mexico.

26 Sep 2012

Communism school

Grooming the next generation of Chinese leadership.

26 Sep 2012

Nerd Dreams

Harking back to the days of floppy disks, the Nerd Dreams calendar project showcases long-outdated but fondly-remembered computers such as the C64, the Atari ST...

26 Sep 2012

China's deadly mines

Strong demand and lax safety standards have made China's mines the most dangerous in the world, despite the government's drive to clamp down.

26 Sep 2012

MORE IN PICTURES

Editors Choice Pictures

Editors Choice Pictures

Our top photos from the last 24 hours.

Faces of the Rohingya

Faces of the Rohingya

More than 600,000 Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh since a Myanmar military crackdown began in late August.

Editor's Choice Pictures

Editor's Choice Pictures

Our top photos from the last 24 hours.

Zimbabwe celebrates

Zimbabwe celebrates

People dance and car horns blare on the streets of Harare after Robert Mugabe resigned as Zimbabwe's president.

The rule of Mugabe

The rule of Mugabe

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe resigns, ending four decades of rule.

Trump pardons Thanksgiving turkey

Trump pardons Thanksgiving turkey

President Donald Trump pardons his first National Thanksgiving turkey.

Today in Sports

Today in Sports

Our top sports photography of the day.

Inside the Rohingya refugee camps

Inside the Rohingya refugee camps

Some 800,000 Rohingya refugees who fled violence in Myanmar are now living in makeshift settlements in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, according to the United Nations.

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip mark platinum anniversary

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip mark platinum anniversary

Queen Elizabeth and husband Prince Philip mark their platinum wedding anniversary with a small family get-together, a far cry from the pomp and celebration which greeted their marriage 70 years ago.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast