Edition:
India
Pictures | Tue Oct 8, 2019 | 8:40am IST

Future dam imperils ancient Turkish town

An old village near the ancient Hasankeyf fortress is seen in the southeastern town of Hasankeyf, Turkey, October 3, 2019. Around 3,000 residents of the town on the Tigris River are being forced to leave by an Oct. 8 deadline to make way for the Ilisu Dam, a project two decades in the making that will generate electricity for southeast Turkey.

REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

An old village near the ancient Hasankeyf fortress is seen in the southeastern town of Hasankeyf, Turkey, October 3, 2019. Around 3,000 residents of the town on the Tigris River are being forced to leave by an Oct. 8 deadline to make way for the...more

An old village near the ancient Hasankeyf fortress is seen in the southeastern town of Hasankeyf, Turkey, October 3, 2019. Around 3,000 residents of the town on the Tigris River are being forced to leave by an Oct. 8 deadline to make way for the Ilisu Dam, a project two decades in the making that will generate electricity for southeast Turkey. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
1 / 15
A boys stands in front of his house in Hasankeyf. Not all of Hasankeyf's residents will have moved out by Tuesday's deadline and authorities will need to extend it, residents and activists say, further delaying the project that has faced numerous setbacks since it was launched more than 20 years ago.

REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

A boys stands in front of his house in Hasankeyf. Not all of Hasankeyf's residents will have moved out by Tuesday's deadline and authorities will need to extend it, residents and activists say, further delaying the project that has faced numerous...more

A boys stands in front of his house in Hasankeyf. Not all of Hasankeyf's residents will have moved out by Tuesday's deadline and authorities will need to extend it, residents and activists say, further delaying the project that has faced numerous setbacks since it was launched more than 20 years ago. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
2 / 15
A view of old Hasankeyf, with the new Hasankeyf in the background. In July, Turkey finally started to fill the dam further downstream on the Tigris where villages have already been vacated and are now partially submerged. Water is expected to start rising in Hasankeyf, located in the southeastern province of Batman, in the next few months.

REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

A view of old Hasankeyf, with the new Hasankeyf in the background. In July, Turkey finally started to fill the dam further downstream on the Tigris where villages have already been vacated and are now partially submerged. Water is expected to start...more

A view of old Hasankeyf, with the new Hasankeyf in the background. In July, Turkey finally started to fill the dam further downstream on the Tigris where villages have already been vacated and are now partially submerged. Water is expected to start rising in Hasankeyf, located in the southeastern province of Batman, in the next few months. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
3 / 15
Cemil Yavanas, a resident of Hasankeyf, carries old furniture from his house before moving to new Hasankeyf. The Ilisu Dam, expected to be operational for 50 years, will generate 1,200 megawatts of electricity, making it Turkey's fourth-largest dam in terms of energy production. But it has been criticized by activists who say the dam, once completely filled, will have displaced 78,000 people from 199 surrounding villages and risks creating water shortages downstream in Iraq.

REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

Cemil Yavanas, a resident of Hasankeyf, carries old furniture from his house before moving to new Hasankeyf. The Ilisu Dam, expected to be operational for 50 years, will generate 1,200 megawatts of electricity, making it Turkey's fourth-largest dam...more

Cemil Yavanas, a resident of Hasankeyf, carries old furniture from his house before moving to new Hasankeyf. The Ilisu Dam, expected to be operational for 50 years, will generate 1,200 megawatts of electricity, making it Turkey's fourth-largest dam in terms of energy production. But it has been criticized by activists who say the dam, once completely filled, will have displaced 78,000 people from 199 surrounding villages and risks creating water shortages downstream in Iraq. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
4 / 15
An old cemetery is seen in Hasankeyf. Hasankeyf was used by the Romans as a fortress town to ward off Persians. The town was later destroyed by Mongols and rebuilt in the 11th century by Seljuk Turks.

REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

An old cemetery is seen in Hasankeyf. Hasankeyf was used by the Romans as a fortress town to ward off Persians. The town was later destroyed by Mongols and rebuilt in the 11th century by Seljuk Turks. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

An old cemetery is seen in Hasankeyf. Hasankeyf was used by the Romans as a fortress town to ward off Persians. The town was later destroyed by Mongols and rebuilt in the 11th century by Seljuk Turks. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
5 / 15
Yeni Hasankeyf, or New Hasankeyf, across the river from the old town features a hospital, an elementary school and government buildings are already up and running. Parks and playgrounds for children have also been built and trees planted.

REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

Yeni Hasankeyf, or New Hasankeyf, across the river from the old town features a hospital, an elementary school and government buildings are already up and running. Parks and playgrounds for children have also been built and trees...more

Yeni Hasankeyf, or New Hasankeyf, across the river from the old town features a hospital, an elementary school and government buildings are already up and running. Parks and playgrounds for children have also been built and trees planted. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
6 / 15
Sabahat Ozturk, a resident of Hasankeyf, stands at her house. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

Sabahat Ozturk, a resident of Hasankeyf, stands at her house. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

Sabahat Ozturk, a resident of Hasankeyf, stands at her house. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
7 / 15
Tourists visit Hasankeyf. In a bid to attract tourists to the area, eight historic structures, including a massive tomb, an ancient Turkish bath, a historic mosque and its minaret, have been moved from the old town to Yeni Hasankeyf.

REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

Tourists visit Hasankeyf. In a bid to attract tourists to the area, eight historic structures, including a massive tomb, an ancient Turkish bath, a historic mosque and its minaret, have been moved from the old town to Yeni Hasankeyf. REUTERS/Sertac...more

Tourists visit Hasankeyf. In a bid to attract tourists to the area, eight historic structures, including a massive tomb, an ancient Turkish bath, a historic mosque and its minaret, have been moved from the old town to Yeni Hasankeyf. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
8 / 15
The ancient Hasankeyf fortress dates back to the 4th century BC. Archaeologists are working on a digging site, while above lie caves where people used to live.

REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

The ancient Hasankeyf fortress dates back to the 4th century BC. Archaeologists are working on a digging site, while above lie caves where people used to live. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

The ancient Hasankeyf fortress dates back to the 4th century BC. Archaeologists are working on a digging site, while above lie caves where people used to live. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
9 / 15
Further down the Tigris River the village of Celikkoy, located 9.3 miles (15 km) north of the dam in the southeastern province of Mardin, is almost fully submerged by the rising waters. The government started filling the dam in July without notifying anyone in advance, said Mehmet Selim Acar, 65, who has remained in Celikkoy, moving into a dilapidated former gendarmerie command post without electricity on a hill above the village.

REUTERS/Mehmet Emin Caliskan

Further down the Tigris River the village of Celikkoy, located 9.3 miles (15 km) north of the dam in the southeastern province of Mardin, is almost fully submerged by the rising waters. The government started filling the dam in July without notifying...more

Further down the Tigris River the village of Celikkoy, located 9.3 miles (15 km) north of the dam in the southeastern province of Mardin, is almost fully submerged by the rising waters. The government started filling the dam in July without notifying anyone in advance, said Mehmet Selim Acar, 65, who has remained in Celikkoy, moving into a dilapidated former gendarmerie command post without electricity on a hill above the village. REUTERS/Mehmet Emin Caliskan
Close
10 / 15
A girl stands overlooking Hasankeyf. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

A girl stands overlooking Hasankeyf. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

A girl stands overlooking Hasankeyf. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
11 / 15
An aerial view of Hasankeyf. REUTERS/Mehmet Emin Caliskan

An aerial view of Hasankeyf. REUTERS/Mehmet Emin Caliskan

An aerial view of Hasankeyf. REUTERS/Mehmet Emin Caliskan
Close
12 / 15
An old cemetery is seen in Hasankeyf, with the new Hasankeyf in the background. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

An old cemetery is seen in Hasankeyf, with the new Hasankeyf in the background. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

An old cemetery is seen in Hasankeyf, with the new Hasankeyf in the background. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
13 / 15
A woman takes pictures as she visits Hasankeyf. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

A woman takes pictures as she visits Hasankeyf. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

A woman takes pictures as she visits Hasankeyf. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
14 / 15
A view of Hasankeyf by the Tigris River. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

A view of Hasankeyf by the Tigris River. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

A view of Hasankeyf by the Tigris River. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar
Close
15 / 15

Next Slideshows

The gates of Jerusalem's Old City

Jews, Muslims and Christians pass daily through the gates of Jerusalem's Old City, on their way to and from prayers or simply to go about their everyday...

08 Oct 2019

Abandoned Bible-themed amusement park

Inside Holy Land USA, a now-closed theme park inspired by Bible passages and locales in Waterbury, Connecticut.

07 Oct 2019

Jetting back to the Sixties at the TWA Hotel

Welcome to the TWA Hotel, housed inside the former TWA Flight Center terminal designed by architect Eero Saarinen and first opened in 1962, at JFK International...

04 Oct 2019

Journalists in the line of fire

Highlighting the work of journalists in hostile environments.

03 Oct 2019

MORE IN PICTURES

Will and Kate in Pakistan

Will and Kate in Pakistan

Prince William and and wife Catherine highlighted the UK's 'unique bonds' with Pakistan during a five-day visit to the South Asian nation, the first trip by a British royal family member in more than a decade.

Japan cleans up after Typhoon Hagibis

Japan cleans up after Typhoon Hagibis

Residents in Fukushima prefecture begin clearing wreckage after scores of rivers burst their banks when Typhoon Hagibis hit northeastern Japan.

Editor's Choice Pictures

Editor's Choice Pictures

Our top photos from the last 24 hours.

Sao Paulo Fashion Week

Sao Paulo Fashion Week

Backstage and collection highlights from Brazil.

Myth-making of Kim Jong Un

Myth-making of Kim Jong Un

A look at North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as state news agency KCNA releases photos of Kim riding alone on a large white horse through snowy fields and woods on Mt Paektu, the spiritual homeland of the Kim dynasty.

Turkey attacks Kurds in northeast Syria

Turkey attacks Kurds in northeast Syria

Our latest photos as Turkey presses its military offensive against U.S.-allied Kurdish fighters in northeast Syria

Clashes erupt as Catalan separatists protest sentences for leaders

Clashes erupt as Catalan separatists protest sentences for leaders

Spain's Supreme Court jailed nine Catalan separatist leaders for between nine and 13 years for their role in a 2017 failed independence bid, a decision that triggered mass protests in the region and left the future course of the dispute uncertain.

Japan's new emperor on the world stage

Japan's new emperor on the world stage

New Japanese Emperor Naruhito is set to be enthroned next week in a centuries-old ceremony attended by some 2,500 people, including heads of state and other dignitaries from nearly 200 countries.

Typhoon Hagibis slams Japan

Typhoon Hagibis slams Japan

The Japanese government has sent thousands of soldiers and rescue workers to save stranded residents in the destruction left by Typhoon Hagibis.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast