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Pictures | Thu Apr 25, 2019 | 6:10am IST

German scientists create see-through human organs

Dr. Ali Erturk, Group Leader at the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research (ISD) at the Ludwig Maximillian's University, looks at a transparent human brain at his laboratory in Munich, Germany April 23, 2019. Researchers in Germany have created transparent human organs using a new technology that could pave the way to print three-dimensional body parts such as kidneys for transplants.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk, Group Leader at the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research (ISD) at the Ludwig Maximillian's University, looks at a transparent human brain at his laboratory in Munich, Germany April 23, 2019. Researchers in Germany have created...more

Dr. Ali Erturk, Group Leader at the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research (ISD) at the Ludwig Maximillian's University, looks at a transparent human brain at his laboratory in Munich, Germany April 23, 2019. Researchers in Germany have created transparent human organs using a new technology that could pave the way to print three-dimensional body parts such as kidneys for transplants. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
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Dr. Ali Erturk looks at a transparent mouse at his laboratory. Scientists led by Erturk at Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich have developed a technique that uses a solvent to make organs such as the brain and kidneys transparent.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk looks at a transparent mouse at his laboratory. Scientists led by Erturk at Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich have developed a technique that uses a solvent to make organs such as the brain and kidneys...more

Dr. Ali Erturk looks at a transparent mouse at his laboratory. Scientists led by Erturk at Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich have developed a technique that uses a solvent to make organs such as the brain and kidneys transparent. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
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A transparent human brain is shown. The organ is then scanned by lasers in a microscope that allows researchers to capture the entire structure, including the blood vessels and every single cell in its specific location.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

A transparent human brain is shown. The organ is then scanned by lasers in a microscope that allows researchers to capture the entire structure, including the blood vessels and every single cell in its specific location. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

A transparent human brain is shown. The organ is then scanned by lasers in a microscope that allows researchers to capture the entire structure, including the blood vessels and every single cell in its specific location. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
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An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney. Using this blueprint, researchers print out the scaffold of the organ. They then load the 3D printer with stem cells which act as "ink" and are injected into the correct position making the organ functional.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney. Using this blueprint, researchers print out the scaffold of the organ. They then load the 3D printer with stem cells which act as "ink" and are injected into the correct position making...more

An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney. Using this blueprint, researchers print out the scaffold of the organ. They then load the 3D printer with stem cells which act as "ink" and are injected into the correct position making the organ functional. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
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An employee works with stem cells. While 3D printing is already used widely to produce spare parts for industry, Erturk said the development marks a step forward for 3D printing in the medical field.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee works with stem cells. While 3D printing is already used widely to produce spare parts for industry, Erturk said the development marks a step forward for 3D printing in the medical field. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee works with stem cells. While 3D printing is already used widely to produce spare parts for industry, Erturk said the development marks a step forward for 3D printing in the medical field. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
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A transparent mouse is pictured at the laboratory of Dr. Ali Erturk. Until now 3D-printed organs lacked detailed cellular structures because they were based on images from computer tomography or MRI machines, he said. "We can see where every single cell is located in transparent human organs. And then we can actually replicate exactly the same, using 3D bioprinting technology to make a real functional organ," he said. "Therefore, I believe we are much closer to a real human organ for the first time now."

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

A transparent mouse is pictured at the laboratory of Dr. Ali Erturk. Until now 3D-printed organs lacked detailed cellular structures because they were based on images from computer tomography or MRI machines, he said. "We can see where every single...more

A transparent mouse is pictured at the laboratory of Dr. Ali Erturk. Until now 3D-printed organs lacked detailed cellular structures because they were based on images from computer tomography or MRI machines, he said. "We can see where every single cell is located in transparent human organs. And then we can actually replicate exactly the same, using 3D bioprinting technology to make a real functional organ," he said. "Therefore, I believe we are much closer to a real human organ for the first time now." REUTERS/Michael Dalder
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Dr. Ali Erturk works at his laboratory. Erturk's team plan to start by creating a bioprinted pancreas over the next 2-3 years and also hope to develop a kidney within 5-6 years.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at his laboratory. Erturk's team plan to start by creating a bioprinted pancreas over the next 2-3 years and also hope to develop a kidney within 5-6 years. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at his laboratory. Erturk's team plan to start by creating a bioprinted pancreas over the next 2-3 years and also hope to develop a kidney within 5-6 years. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
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Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory. The researchers will first test to see whether animals can survive with the bioprinted organs and could start clinical trials within 5-10 years, he said.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory. The researchers will first test to see whether animals can survive with the bioprinted organs and could start clinical trials within 5-10 years, he said. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory. The researchers will first test to see whether animals can survive with the bioprinted organs and could start clinical trials within 5-10 years, he said. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
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Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Dr. Ali Erturk works at a laser microscope at his laboratory. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
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An employee works with stem cells.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee works with stem cells. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee works with stem cells. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
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An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney.

REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

An employee checks the 3D printing of a scaffold for a kidney. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
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