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Pictures | Thu Sep 10, 2020 | 7:53pm IST

Mexico City's ancient lake reclaims scrapped airport

Bright green stalks of weeds are sprouting from the ground where planes were supposed to take off at a new Mexico City airport as officials let nature take over in their bid to transform the marshy swath of an ancient lake into a giant park.    REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

Bright green stalks of weeds are sprouting from the ground where planes were supposed to take off at a new Mexico City airport as officials let nature take over in their bid to transform the marshy swath of an ancient lake into a giant park. ...more

Bright green stalks of weeds are sprouting from the ground where planes were supposed to take off at a new Mexico City airport as officials let nature take over in their bid to transform the marshy swath of an ancient lake into a giant park. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
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The ghostly skeletons of a partly built control tower and flight terminal are recognizably in the style of Norman Foster, the British architect commissioned by Mexico's last president to build a futuristic international airport at a cost of some $13 billion on 4,800 hectares just east of the capital.   REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

The ghostly skeletons of a partly built control tower and flight terminal are recognizably in the style of Norman Foster, the British architect commissioned by Mexico's last president to build a futuristic international airport at a cost of some $13...more

The ghostly skeletons of a partly built control tower and flight terminal are recognizably in the style of Norman Foster, the British architect commissioned by Mexico's last president to build a futuristic international airport at a cost of some $13 billion on 4,800 hectares just east of the capital. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
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Upon taking office in December 2018, President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador axed the project, citing the results of an informal referendum, after arguing it would be costly to prevent sinking on the waterlogged soil. Instead of the slick design from Foster, whose award-winning glass and steel web-like buildings dot the globe, Lopez Obrador opted to expand an existing military airport.     
REUTERS/Henry Romero

Upon taking office in December 2018, President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador axed the project, citing the results of an informal referendum, after arguing it would be costly to prevent sinking on the waterlogged soil. Instead of the slick design from...more

Upon taking office in December 2018, President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador axed the project, citing the results of an informal referendum, after arguing it would be costly to prevent sinking on the waterlogged soil. Instead of the slick design from Foster, whose award-winning glass and steel web-like buildings dot the globe, Lopez Obrador opted to expand an existing military airport. REUTERS/Henry Romero
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The abandoned construction zone is now part of a project to conserve 12,200 hectares of marsh on what was once massive Lake Texcoco before Spanish colonizers in the 1600s began draining the water to prevent flooding in their burgeoning settlement.     REUTERS/Carlos Jasso  

The abandoned construction zone is now part of a project to conserve 12,200 hectares of marsh on what was once massive Lake Texcoco before Spanish colonizers in the 1600s began draining the water to prevent flooding in their burgeoning settlement. ...more

The abandoned construction zone is now part of a project to conserve 12,200 hectares of marsh on what was once massive Lake Texcoco before Spanish colonizers in the 1600s began draining the water to prevent flooding in their burgeoning settlement. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso  
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Officials point to recent flooding as proof that maintenance would have been difficult, and say less than 20% of construction was completed. They paid some 13 billion pesos ($603 million) to cancel more than 600 contracts left in limbo. During a recent visit, a moat of green water had risen around a flying-saucer-like building where a control tower juts 20 meters (66 ft) high, less than a third of its intended height.     REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

Officials point to recent flooding as proof that maintenance would have been difficult, and say less than 20% of construction was completed. They paid some 13 billion pesos ($603 million) to cancel more than 600 contracts left in limbo. During a...more

Officials point to recent flooding as proof that maintenance would have been difficult, and say less than 20% of construction was completed. They paid some 13 billion pesos ($603 million) to cancel more than 600 contracts left in limbo. During a recent visit, a moat of green water had risen around a flying-saucer-like building where a control tower juts 20 meters (66 ft) high, less than a third of its intended height. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
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Birds glided in a pond beneath columns of crisscrossing steel bars that were meant to become a terminal greeting some 70 million passengers a year. The steel will be sold as scrap.   REUTERS/Henry Romero

Birds glided in a pond beneath columns of crisscrossing steel bars that were meant to become a terminal greeting some 70 million passengers a year. The steel will be sold as scrap. REUTERS/Henry Romero

Birds glided in a pond beneath columns of crisscrossing steel bars that were meant to become a terminal greeting some 70 million passengers a year. The steel will be sold as scrap. REUTERS/Henry Romero
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Conservation efforts in the area date to the 1970s, when the government grappled to contain dust storms that swept from the dry lake basin over Mexico City.     REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

Conservation efforts in the area date to the 1970s, when the government grappled to contain dust storms that swept from the dry lake basin over Mexico City. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

Conservation efforts in the area date to the 1970s, when the government grappled to contain dust storms that swept from the dry lake basin over Mexico City. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
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The current project has been hailed by Lopez Obrador as a "new Tenochtitlan," referring to the centuries-old Aztec capital built in the middle of a sprawling lake, where Mexico City is today.     REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

The current project has been hailed by Lopez Obrador as a "new Tenochtitlan," referring to the centuries-old Aztec capital built in the middle of a sprawling lake, where Mexico City is today. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

The current project has been hailed by Lopez Obrador as a "new Tenochtitlan," referring to the centuries-old Aztec capital built in the middle of a sprawling lake, where Mexico City is today. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
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A general view shows parts of the structure of a flight terminal at the abandoned construction site, now flooded by summer rains, on the outskirts of Mexico City. 
   REUTERS/Henry Romero

A general view shows parts of the structure of a flight terminal at the abandoned construction site, now flooded by summer rains, on the outskirts of Mexico City. REUTERS/Henry Romero

A general view shows parts of the structure of a flight terminal at the abandoned construction site, now flooded by summer rains, on the outskirts of Mexico City. REUTERS/Henry Romero
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The abandoned construction site on the outskirts of Mexico City.  REUTERS/Henry Romero

The abandoned construction site on the outskirts of Mexico City. REUTERS/Henry Romero

The abandoned construction site on the outskirts of Mexico City. REUTERS/Henry Romero
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