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Pictures | Wed Dec 13, 2017 | 10:05pm IST

Notable deaths in 2017

Chris Cornell, 52, was the frontman of Soundgarden, one of the leading bands of the grunge music movement in the 1980s and '90s, releasing albums such as "Badmotorfinger" and the Grammy-winning "Superunknown," which brought the band mainstream music scene success.

REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Chris Cornell, 52, was the frontman of Soundgarden, one of the leading bands of the grunge music movement in the 1980s and '90s, releasing albums such as "Badmotorfinger" and the Grammy-winning "Superunknown," which brought the band mainstream music...more

Chris Cornell, 52, was the frontman of Soundgarden, one of the leading bands of the grunge music movement in the 1980s and '90s, releasing albums such as "Badmotorfinger" and the Grammy-winning "Superunknown," which brought the band mainstream music scene success. REUTERS/Mark Blinch
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Playboy founder Hugh Hefner, 91, helped usher in the 1960s sexual revolution with his groundbreaking men's magazine and built a business empire around his libertine lifestyle. Hefner was sometimes characterized as an oversexed Peter Pan as he kept a harem of young blondes that numbered as many as seven at his legendary Playboy Mansion. Hefner created Playboy as the first stylish glossy men's magazine and in addition to nude fold-outs, it had intellectual appeal with top writers such as Kurt Vonnegut, Joyce Carol Oates, Vladimir Nabokov, James Baldwin and Alex Haley for men who liked to say they did not buy the magazine just for the pictures.

REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Playboy founder Hugh Hefner, 91, helped usher in the 1960s sexual revolution with his groundbreaking men's magazine and built a business empire around his libertine lifestyle. Hefner was sometimes characterized as an oversexed Peter Pan as he kept a...more

Playboy founder Hugh Hefner, 91, helped usher in the 1960s sexual revolution with his groundbreaking men's magazine and built a business empire around his libertine lifestyle. Hefner was sometimes characterized as an oversexed Peter Pan as he kept a harem of young blondes that numbered as many as seven at his legendary Playboy Mansion. Hefner created Playboy as the first stylish glossy men's magazine and in addition to nude fold-outs, it had intellectual appeal with top writers such as Kurt Vonnegut, Joyce Carol Oates, Vladimir Nabokov, James Baldwin and Alex Haley for men who liked to say they did not buy the magazine just for the pictures. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Edith Windsor, 88, the lead plaintiff in a successful challenge to a federal law that defined marriage as between one man and one woman, helped pave the way for gay marriage nationwide. The case, which made Windsor a revered figure in the modern gay rights movement, originally stemmed from a tax dispute. Windsor and Thea Spyer spent four decades engaged to be married before they finally tied the knot in Canada in 2007. Spyer died in 2009. Under the Defense of Marriage Act, same-sex marriages were not federally recognized, depriving Windsor of an estate-tax break afforded to heterosexual surviving spouses. The Supreme Court's Windsor decision applied to gay marriages only in the 13 states that permitted them at the time. In the ensuing months, the central reasoning of the case was cited by courts in several states that found gay marriage bans unlawful.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Edith Windsor, 88, the lead plaintiff in a successful challenge to a federal law that defined marriage as between one man and one woman, helped pave the way for gay marriage nationwide. The case, which made Windsor a revered figure in the modern gay...more

Edith Windsor, 88, the lead plaintiff in a successful challenge to a federal law that defined marriage as between one man and one woman, helped pave the way for gay marriage nationwide. The case, which made Windsor a revered figure in the modern gay rights movement, originally stemmed from a tax dispute. Windsor and Thea Spyer spent four decades engaged to be married before they finally tied the knot in Canada in 2007. Spyer died in 2009. Under the Defense of Marriage Act, same-sex marriages were not federally recognized, depriving Windsor of an estate-tax break afforded to heterosexual surviving spouses. The Supreme Court's Windsor decision applied to gay marriages only in the 13 states that permitted them at the time. In the ensuing months, the central reasoning of the case was cited by courts in several states that found gay marriage bans unlawful. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Singer and songwriter Tom Petty, 66, was known for his vibrant guitar riffs, distinctly raw, nasal vocals and slick song lyrics graced such hits as "Refugee," "Free Fallin'" and "American Girl."

REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Singer and songwriter Tom Petty, 66, was known for his vibrant guitar riffs, distinctly raw, nasal vocals and slick song lyrics graced such hits as "Refugee," "Free Fallin'" and "American Girl." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Singer and songwriter Tom Petty, 66, was known for his vibrant guitar riffs, distinctly raw, nasal vocals and slick song lyrics graced such hits as "Refugee," "Free Fallin'" and "American Girl." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Roger Ailes, 77, founder, chairman and CEO of Fox News, became one of the most powerful figures in both U.S. politics and media by turning the network into a booming voice for conservatives before he was brought down by sexual harassment charges. REUTERS/Fred Prouser

Roger Ailes, 77, founder, chairman and CEO of Fox News, became one of the most powerful figures in both U.S. politics and media by turning the network into a booming voice for conservatives before he was brought down by sexual harassment charges....more

Roger Ailes, 77, founder, chairman and CEO of Fox News, became one of the most powerful figures in both U.S. politics and media by turning the network into a booming voice for conservatives before he was brought down by sexual harassment charges. REUTERS/Fred Prouser
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Emmy-winning actress Mary Tyler Moore, 80, brightened American television screens as the perky suburban housewife on "The Dick Van Dyke Show" and then as a fledgling feminist on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show."

REUTERS/Sam Mircovich

Emmy-winning actress Mary Tyler Moore, 80, brightened American television screens as the perky suburban housewife on "The Dick Van Dyke Show" and then as a fledgling feminist on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show." REUTERS/Sam Mircovich

Emmy-winning actress Mary Tyler Moore, 80, brightened American television screens as the perky suburban housewife on "The Dick Van Dyke Show" and then as a fledgling feminist on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show." REUTERS/Sam Mircovich
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Charles Manson, 83, was the U.S. cult leader who orchestrated a string of gruesome killings in Southern California by his "family" of young followers in the late 1960s. REUTERS/File Photo

Charles Manson, 83, was the U.S. cult leader who orchestrated a string of gruesome killings in Southern California by his "family" of young followers in the late 1960s. REUTERS/File Photo

Charles Manson, 83, was the U.S. cult leader who orchestrated a string of gruesome killings in Southern California by his "family" of young followers in the late 1960s. REUTERS/File Photo
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Chinese Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, 61, was a prominent dissident since the 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy protests. He was jailed for 11 years in 2009 for "inciting subversion of state power" after he helped write a petition known as "Charter 08" calling for sweeping political reforms.

REUTERS/Will Burgess

Chinese Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, 61, was a prominent dissident since the 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy protests. He was jailed for 11 years in 2009 for "inciting subversion of state power" after he helped write a petition known as...more

Chinese Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, 61, was a prominent dissident since the 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy protests. He was jailed for 11 years in 2009 for "inciting subversion of state power" after he helped write a petition known as "Charter 08" calling for sweeping political reforms. REUTERS/Will Burgess
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American actor Bill Paxton, 61, rose to stardom in such Hollywood blockbusters as "Titanic" and inspired budding meteorologists as a tornado chaser in "Twister."

REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

American actor Bill Paxton, 61, rose to stardom in such Hollywood blockbusters as "Titanic" and inspired budding meteorologists as a tornado chaser in "Twister." REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

American actor Bill Paxton, 61, rose to stardom in such Hollywood blockbusters as "Titanic" and inspired budding meteorologists as a tornado chaser in "Twister." REUTERS/Danny Moloshok
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Jake LaMotta, 95, was the brutish former boxing champion whose life of violence in and out of the ring was portrayed in the movie "Raging Bull."

REUTERS/Teddy Blackburn

Jake LaMotta, 95, was the brutish former boxing champion whose life of violence in and out of the ring was portrayed in the movie "Raging Bull." REUTERS/Teddy Blackburn

Jake LaMotta, 95, was the brutish former boxing champion whose life of violence in and out of the ring was portrayed in the movie "Raging Bull." REUTERS/Teddy Blackburn
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Chester Bennington, 41, was known for his powerful, belting vocals as singer for the band Linkin Park. He spoke openly in the past about his struggles to overcome his demons when Linkin Park first found fame in 2000 with their best-selling debut album "Hybrid Theory" and went on to become one of the most popular alt-rock bands of their generation.

REUTERS/Steve Marcus

Chester Bennington, 41, was known for his powerful, belting vocals as singer for the band Linkin Park. He spoke openly in the past about his struggles to overcome his demons when Linkin Park first found fame in 2000 with their best-selling debut...more

Chester Bennington, 41, was known for his powerful, belting vocals as singer for the band Linkin Park. He spoke openly in the past about his struggles to overcome his demons when Linkin Park first found fame in 2000 with their best-selling debut album "Hybrid Theory" and went on to become one of the most popular alt-rock bands of their generation. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
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Chuck Berry, 90, duck-walked his way into the pantheon of rock 'n' roll pioneers as one of its most influential guitarists and lyricists, creating raucous anthems that defined the genre's sound and heartbeat. Considered one of the founding fathers of rock 'n' roll, Charles Edward Anderson Berry was present at its infancy in the 1950s and emerged as its first star guitarist and songwriter - a nearly 30-year-old black performer whose style electrified young white audiences and was emulated by white performers who came to dominate American popular music.

REUTERS/Felix Ordonez

Chuck Berry, 90, duck-walked his way into the pantheon of rock 'n' roll pioneers as one of its most influential guitarists and lyricists, creating raucous anthems that defined the genre's sound and heartbeat. Considered one of the founding fathers of...more

Chuck Berry, 90, duck-walked his way into the pantheon of rock 'n' roll pioneers as one of its most influential guitarists and lyricists, creating raucous anthems that defined the genre's sound and heartbeat. Considered one of the founding fathers of rock 'n' roll, Charles Edward Anderson Berry was present at its infancy in the 1950s and emerged as its first star guitarist and songwriter - a nearly 30-year-old black performer whose style electrified young white audiences and was emulated by white performers who came to dominate American popular music. REUTERS/Felix Ordonez
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Retired Major League Baseball pitcher Roy Halladay, 40, twice won the game's top pitching award and threw one of only two no-hitters in postseason history, died when his small plane crashed off the west coast of central Florida. Halladay pitched for the Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies and retired in 2013 after a 15-year career. He won a Cy Young Award as best pitcher in both the American and National Leagues, was an eight-time All Star and amassed 203 regular-season victories.

REUTERS/Tim Shaffer

Retired Major League Baseball pitcher Roy Halladay, 40, twice won the game's top pitching award and threw one of only two no-hitters in postseason history, died when his small plane crashed off the west coast of central Florida. Halladay pitched for...more

Retired Major League Baseball pitcher Roy Halladay, 40, twice won the game's top pitching award and threw one of only two no-hitters in postseason history, died when his small plane crashed off the west coast of central Florida. Halladay pitched for the Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies and retired in 2013 after a 15-year career. He won a Cy Young Award as best pitcher in both the American and National Leagues, was an eight-time All Star and amassed 203 regular-season victories. REUTERS/Tim Shaffer
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Former Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 87, was the architect of Germany's 1990 reunification and mentor to Angela Merkel. Germany's longest-serving post-war chancellor from 1982 to 1998, Kohl was a driving force behind the introduction of the euro currency, persuading skeptical Germans to give up the deutschemark, a cherished symbol of the "economic miracle" of the 1950s and 1960s. By committing to anchor Germany within Europe under a common currency, he overcame resistance to reunification from French President Francois Mitterrand, Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and Margaret Thatcher, the British prime minister who feared the return of a powerful, united Germany.

REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz

Former Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 87, was the architect of Germany's 1990 reunification and mentor to Angela Merkel. Germany's longest-serving post-war chancellor from 1982 to 1998, Kohl was a driving force behind the introduction of the euro currency,...more

Former Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 87, was the architect of Germany's 1990 reunification and mentor to Angela Merkel. Germany's longest-serving post-war chancellor from 1982 to 1998, Kohl was a driving force behind the introduction of the euro currency, persuading skeptical Germans to give up the deutschemark, a cherished symbol of the "economic miracle" of the 1950s and 1960s. By committing to anchor Germany within Europe under a common currency, he overcame resistance to reunification from French President Francois Mitterrand, Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and Margaret Thatcher, the British prime minister who feared the return of a powerful, united Germany. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz
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Norma McCorvey, 69, was the anonymous plaintiff known as "Jane Roe" in the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Roe v. Wade ruling legalizing abortion. Her lawsuit, filed under the pseudonym, resulted in the court's 1973 decision that established a woman's right to an abortion. McCorvey lent her real name to supporters of the abortion-rights movement in the 1980s. She did an about-face and later spoke out on behalf of anti-abortion campaigners, however.

REUTERS/Shaun Heasley

Norma McCorvey, 69, was the anonymous plaintiff known as "Jane Roe" in the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Roe v. Wade ruling legalizing abortion. Her lawsuit, filed under the pseudonym, resulted in the court's 1973 decision that established a woman's...more

Norma McCorvey, 69, was the anonymous plaintiff known as "Jane Roe" in the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Roe v. Wade ruling legalizing abortion. Her lawsuit, filed under the pseudonym, resulted in the court's 1973 decision that established a woman's right to an abortion. McCorvey lent her real name to supporters of the abortion-rights movement in the 1980s. She did an about-face and later spoke out on behalf of anti-abortion campaigners, however. REUTERS/Shaun Heasley
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Martin McGuinness, 66, was the former Irish Republican Army commander who laid down his arms and turned peacemaker to help end Northern Ireland's 30-year conflict. As a young street fighter in Londonderry and later as a politician and statesman, McGuinness saw his mission as defending the rights of the Catholic minority against the pro-British Protestants who for decades dominated Northern Ireland. But for his critics, that cause was never enough to justify the IRA's campaign of bombings and shootings that killed hundreds of British soldiers and civilians. In his later years McGuinness was hailed as a peacemaker for negotiating the 1998 peace deal, sharing power with his bitterest enemy and shaking hands with the Queen, though the gestures were condemned by some former comrades as treachery.

REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne

Martin McGuinness, 66, was the former Irish Republican Army commander who laid down his arms and turned peacemaker to help end Northern Ireland's 30-year conflict. As a young street fighter in Londonderry and later as a politician and statesman,...more

Martin McGuinness, 66, was the former Irish Republican Army commander who laid down his arms and turned peacemaker to help end Northern Ireland's 30-year conflict. As a young street fighter in Londonderry and later as a politician and statesman, McGuinness saw his mission as defending the rights of the Catholic minority against the pro-British Protestants who for decades dominated Northern Ireland. But for his critics, that cause was never enough to justify the IRA's campaign of bombings and shootings that killed hundreds of British soldiers and civilians. In his later years McGuinness was hailed as a peacemaker for negotiating the 1998 peace deal, sharing power with his bitterest enemy and shaking hands with the Queen, though the gestures were condemned by some former comrades as treachery. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
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Former New England Patriots star Aaron Hernandez, 27, hanged himself in a Massachusetts prison cell where he was serving a life sentence for the 2013 murder of an acquaintance, days after he had been found not guilty of killing two other people.

REUTERS/Steven Senne/Pool

Former New England Patriots star Aaron Hernandez, 27, hanged himself in a Massachusetts prison cell where he was serving a life sentence for the 2013 murder of an acquaintance, days after he had been found not guilty of killing two other...more

Former New England Patriots star Aaron Hernandez, 27, hanged himself in a Massachusetts prison cell where he was serving a life sentence for the 2013 murder of an acquaintance, days after he had been found not guilty of killing two other people. REUTERS/Steven Senne/Pool
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Eugene Cernan, 82, was the last astronaut to walk on the moon - an experience that he said made him "belong to the universe." Cernan, who was also the second American to walk in space, became a member of the most exclusive club in the universe on Dec. 11, 1972, when he and fellow Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmidt stepped from their lunar landing module onto the moon's surface. Only 10 other people - all American astronauts - had done so before and none since.

REUTERS/NASA/Handout via Reuters

Eugene Cernan, 82, was the last astronaut to walk on the moon - an experience that he said made him "belong to the universe." Cernan, who was also the second American to walk in space, became a member of the most exclusive club in the universe on...more

Eugene Cernan, 82, was the last astronaut to walk on the moon - an experience that he said made him "belong to the universe." Cernan, who was also the second American to walk in space, became a member of the most exclusive club in the universe on Dec. 11, 1972, when he and fellow Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmidt stepped from their lunar landing module onto the moon's surface. Only 10 other people - all American astronauts - had done so before and none since. REUTERS/NASA/Handout via Reuters
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Singer and actor David Cassidy, 67, had androgynous features and jaunty voice that made him a 1970s teen heartthrob on the "The Partridge Family" television show. With dark hair cascading over his shoulders, hazel eyes and a look that emulated many rock stars of the day, Cassidy was cast at 19 in "The Partridge Family" for his sex appeal to girls, not his singing. When the show's producers discovered Cassidy's melodious voice, he became lead singer in the family band.

REUTERS/Andrew Shaw

Singer and actor David Cassidy, 67, had androgynous features and jaunty voice that made him a 1970s teen heartthrob on the "The Partridge Family" television show. With dark hair cascading over his shoulders, hazel eyes and a look that emulated many...more

Singer and actor David Cassidy, 67, had androgynous features and jaunty voice that made him a 1970s teen heartthrob on the "The Partridge Family" television show. With dark hair cascading over his shoulders, hazel eyes and a look that emulated many rock stars of the day, Cassidy was cast at 19 in "The Partridge Family" for his sex appeal to girls, not his singing. When the show's producers discovered Cassidy's melodious voice, he became lead singer in the family band. REUTERS/Andrew Shaw
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Michael Chamberlain, 72, was the father of Australian baby Azaria Chamberlain, who was snatched by a dingo at Uluru in 1980. The 32-year legal mystery over the baby's death in Australia's outback came to an end in 2012 when a coroner found a dingo was responsible for killing Azaria Chamberlain, a case that split national opinion and attracted global headlines. 

REUTERS/Russel McPhedran

Michael Chamberlain, 72, was the father of Australian baby Azaria Chamberlain, who was snatched by a dingo at Uluru in 1980. The 32-year legal mystery over the baby's death in Australia's outback came to an end in 2012 when a coroner found a dingo...more

Michael Chamberlain, 72, was the father of Australian baby Azaria Chamberlain, who was snatched by a dingo at Uluru in 1980. The 32-year legal mystery over the baby's death in Australia's outback came to an end in 2012 when a coroner found a dingo was responsible for killing Azaria Chamberlain, a case that split national opinion and attracted global headlines. REUTERS/Russel McPhedran
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Director George A. Romero, 77, created the zombie film genre with "Night of the Living Dead" and a series of sequels that left a lasting impact on horror movies. Besides the horror of flesh-eating zombies, the "Dead" films featured the theme of people who panic while under siege, turning on each other instead of uniting against their common enemy. Romero, who was born in the Bronx borough of New York, was drawn to telling stories about monsters that are familiar to the people they terrorize, said his business partner, Peter Grunwald.

REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Director George A. Romero, 77, created the zombie film genre with "Night of the Living Dead" and a series of sequels that left a lasting impact on horror movies. Besides the horror of flesh-eating zombies, the "Dead" films featured the theme of...more

Director George A. Romero, 77, created the zombie film genre with "Night of the Living Dead" and a series of sequels that left a lasting impact on horror movies. Besides the horror of flesh-eating zombies, the "Dead" films featured the theme of people who panic while under siege, turning on each other instead of uniting against their common enemy. Romero, who was born in the Bronx borough of New York, was drawn to telling stories about monsters that are familiar to the people they terrorize, said his business partner, Peter Grunwald. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
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Musician Fats Domino, 89, brought rolling New Orleans boogie-woogie piano to early rock 'n' roll in chart-topping hits such as "Blueberry Hill" and "Ain't That a Shame." His nickname was attributed to his short, squatty stature, as well as a tribute to two other pianists - Fats Waller and New Orleans native Fats Pichon. Like contemporaries Little Richard and Chuck Berry, Domino was a black performer whose music crossed over to white audiences and helped shape early rock.

REUTERS/Lee Celano

Musician Fats Domino, 89, brought rolling New Orleans boogie-woogie piano to early rock 'n' roll in chart-topping hits such as "Blueberry Hill" and "Ain't That a Shame." His nickname was attributed to his short, squatty stature, as well as a tribute...more

Musician Fats Domino, 89, brought rolling New Orleans boogie-woogie piano to early rock 'n' roll in chart-topping hits such as "Blueberry Hill" and "Ain't That a Shame." His nickname was attributed to his short, squatty stature, as well as a tribute to two other pianists - Fats Waller and New Orleans native Fats Pichon. Like contemporaries Little Richard and Chuck Berry, Domino was a black performer whose music crossed over to white audiences and helped shape early rock. REUTERS/Lee Celano
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Don Rickles, 90, was the master insult comic who created laughs with ridicule and sarcasm in a decades-long career that earned him the facetious nickname "Mr. Warmth." Rickles, who said he devised his brand of mockery-based humor because he was no good at telling traditional jokes, had an intense, often-ad libbed, rapid-fire delivery and a wide, impish grin. He delighted nightclub audiences, Hollywood royalty and politicians by hurling invective at them, all in good fun.

REUTERS/Fred Prouser

Don Rickles, 90, was the master insult comic who created laughs with ridicule and sarcasm in a decades-long career that earned him the facetious nickname "Mr. Warmth." Rickles, who said he devised his brand of mockery-based humor because he was no...more

Don Rickles, 90, was the master insult comic who created laughs with ridicule and sarcasm in a decades-long career that earned him the facetious nickname "Mr. Warmth." Rickles, who said he devised his brand of mockery-based humor because he was no good at telling traditional jokes, had an intense, often-ad libbed, rapid-fire delivery and a wide, impish grin. He delighted nightclub audiences, Hollywood royalty and politicians by hurling invective at them, all in good fun. REUTERS/Fred Prouser
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Clare Hollingworth, 105, was a rookie reporter for a British newspaper when she broke the news in 1939 that World War Two had begun. In August 1939, at the age of 27, Hollingworth traveled alone to the German border and witnessed the first column of Nazi tanks mobilizing to invade Poland. Three days later she was first to report the outbreak of hostilities not only to readers of The Daily Telegraph, but also to the British and Polish authorities. Hollingworth's reporting of the outbreak of the war was one of the greatest scoops of modern times.

REUTERS/Bobby Yip

Clare Hollingworth, 105, was a rookie reporter for a British newspaper when she broke the news in 1939 that World War Two had begun. In August 1939, at the age of 27, Hollingworth traveled alone to the German border and witnessed the first column of...more

Clare Hollingworth, 105, was a rookie reporter for a British newspaper when she broke the news in 1939 that World War Two had begun. In August 1939, at the age of 27, Hollingworth traveled alone to the German border and witnessed the first column of Nazi tanks mobilizing to invade Poland. Three days later she was first to report the outbreak of hostilities not only to readers of The Daily Telegraph, but also to the British and Polish authorities. Hollingworth's reporting of the outbreak of the war was one of the greatest scoops of modern times. REUTERS/Bobby Yip
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Actor Adam West, 88, earned a place in American pop culture history with his campy portrayal of the title character in the classic 1960s TV series "Batman. Eventually he came to accept that his identity was closely intertwined with the masked crime-fighting hero in the black cape whether he liked it or not. He often was hired to play a comically fictionalized version of himself in live-action and animated roles and became a successful voice actor.

REUTERS/Phil McCarten

Actor Adam West, 88, earned a place in American pop culture history with his campy portrayal of the title character in the classic 1960s TV series "Batman. Eventually he came to accept that his identity was closely intertwined with the masked...more

Actor Adam West, 88, earned a place in American pop culture history with his campy portrayal of the title character in the classic 1960s TV series "Batman. Eventually he came to accept that his identity was closely intertwined with the masked crime-fighting hero in the black cape whether he liked it or not. He often was hired to play a comically fictionalized version of himself in live-action and animated roles and became a successful voice actor. REUTERS/Phil McCarten
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Veteran British actor Sir John Hurt, 77, was Oscar-nominated for his star turn in "The Elephant Man" and his supporting role in "Midnight Express." He starred in more than 200 films and television series over a career spanning six decades.

REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier

Veteran British actor Sir John Hurt, 77, was Oscar-nominated for his star turn in "The Elephant Man" and his supporting role in "Midnight Express." He starred in more than 200 films and television series over a career spanning six...more

Veteran British actor Sir John Hurt, 77, was Oscar-nominated for his star turn in "The Elephant Man" and his supporting role in "Midnight Express." He starred in more than 200 films and television series over a career spanning six decades. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
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Singer-guitarist Glen Campbell, 81, was known as the "Rhinestone Cowboy" who went on a nationwide farewell tour to play hits such as "Wichita Lineman" and "Gentle on My Mind" before Alzheimer's disease robbed him of talents in 2011. He began his career as a well-regarded recording session guitarist in Los Angeles before becoming a fixture on the U.S. music charts, radio and television in the 1960s and '70s. He won six Grammy Awards and had nine No. 1 songs in a career of more than 50 years.

REUTERS/Phil McCarten

Singer-guitarist Glen Campbell, 81, was known as the "Rhinestone Cowboy" who went on a nationwide farewell tour to play hits such as "Wichita Lineman" and "Gentle on My Mind" before Alzheimer's disease robbed him of talents in 2011. He began his...more

Singer-guitarist Glen Campbell, 81, was known as the "Rhinestone Cowboy" who went on a nationwide farewell tour to play hits such as "Wichita Lineman" and "Gentle on My Mind" before Alzheimer's disease robbed him of talents in 2011. He began his career as a well-regarded recording session guitarist in Los Angeles before becoming a fixture on the U.S. music charts, radio and television in the 1960s and '70s. He won six Grammy Awards and had nine No. 1 songs in a career of more than 50 years. REUTERS/Phil McCarten
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Actor Sir Roger Moore, 89, earned international fame playing British secret agent James Bond in seven movies. His 12 years as action man 007, the fictitious spy with a voracious appetite for danger and sex, made Moore a millionaire and a heartthrob the world over, though in reality he was a shy, private man who found some of Bond's escapades embarrassing.

REUTERS/Neil Hall

Actor Sir Roger Moore, 89, earned international fame playing British secret agent James Bond in seven movies. His 12 years as action man 007, the fictitious spy with a voracious appetite for danger and sex, made Moore a millionaire and a heartthrob...more

Actor Sir Roger Moore, 89, earned international fame playing British secret agent James Bond in seven movies. His 12 years as action man 007, the fictitious spy with a voracious appetite for danger and sex, made Moore a millionaire and a heartthrob the world over, though in reality he was a shy, private man who found some of Bond's escapades embarrassing. REUTERS/Neil Hall
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Actor Harry Dean Stanton, 91, had scruffy looks and off-beat demeanor that made him a favorite of directors seeking a character actor to add eccentricity or melancholy to the screen. He appeared in some 70 movies and many television shows including "Repo Man," "Paris, Texas" and most recently David Lynch's reboot of television's "Twin Peaks."

REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Actor Harry Dean Stanton, 91, had scruffy looks and off-beat demeanor that made him a favorite of directors seeking a character actor to add eccentricity or melancholy to the screen. He appeared in some 70 movies and many television shows including...more

Actor Harry Dean Stanton, 91, had scruffy looks and off-beat demeanor that made him a favorite of directors seeking a character actor to add eccentricity or melancholy to the screen. He appeared in some 70 movies and many television shows including "Repo Man," "Paris, Texas" and most recently David Lynch's reboot of television's "Twin Peaks." REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
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Comedian Dick Gregory, 84, lambasted racism and played a prominent role in the 1960s civil rights movement after becoming one of the first black comics to perform for white audiences. Gregory's success as a comedian in the early 1960s helped pave the way for other black comics, such as Richard Pryor, to gain greater fame by reaching a mainstream audience.

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Comedian Dick Gregory, 84, lambasted racism and played a prominent role in the 1960s civil rights movement after becoming one of the first black comics to perform for white audiences. Gregory's success as a comedian in the early 1960s helped pave the...more

Comedian Dick Gregory, 84, lambasted racism and played a prominent role in the 1960s civil rights movement after becoming one of the first black comics to perform for white audiences. Gregory's success as a comedian in the early 1960s helped pave the way for other black comics, such as Richard Pryor, to gain greater fame by reaching a mainstream audience. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Comedian Jerry Lewis, 91, was the high prince of low-brow comedy on stage and in film as well as a fund-raising powerhouse with his annual Labor Day telethon. Lewis rose to fame as the goofy foil to suave partner Dean Martin. At home, he was both loved and derided, while in France, he became a comic icon. He once summed up his career by saying "I've had great success being a total idiot" and said the key was maintaining a certain child-like quality.

REUTERS/Regis Duvignau

Comedian Jerry Lewis, 91, was the high prince of low-brow comedy on stage and in film as well as a fund-raising powerhouse with his annual Labor Day telethon. Lewis rose to fame as the goofy foil to suave partner Dean Martin. At home, he was both...more

Comedian Jerry Lewis, 91, was the high prince of low-brow comedy on stage and in film as well as a fund-raising powerhouse with his annual Labor Day telethon. Lewis rose to fame as the goofy foil to suave partner Dean Martin. At home, he was both loved and derided, while in France, he became a comic icon. He once summed up his career by saying "I've had great success being a total idiot" and said the key was maintaining a certain child-like quality. REUTERS/Regis Duvignau
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Tragically Hip singer Gord Downie, 53, was a Canadian music superstar beloved for songs about culture, small towns and hockey. Downie was known for his frenetic stage presence and telling long stories in the middle of songs. Formed in the 1980s with roots in blues and rock, the Tragically Hip found radio popularity on both classic and alternative rock stations. The Hip, as it was widely known, held an emotional farewell tour last year after Downie's cancer was revealed, with the band's last hometown show in Kingston, Ontario, billed as a national celebration.

REUTERS/Chris Wattie

Tragically Hip singer Gord Downie, 53, was a Canadian music superstar beloved for songs about culture, small towns and hockey. Downie was known for his frenetic stage presence and telling long stories in the middle of songs. Formed in the 1980s with...more

Tragically Hip singer Gord Downie, 53, was a Canadian music superstar beloved for songs about culture, small towns and hockey. Downie was known for his frenetic stage presence and telling long stories in the middle of songs. Formed in the 1980s with roots in blues and rock, the Tragically Hip found radio popularity on both classic and alternative rock stations. The Hip, as it was widely known, held an emotional farewell tour last year after Downie's cancer was revealed, with the band's last hometown show in Kingston, Ontario, billed as a national celebration. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
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Comedian and actor Charlie Murphy, 57, was a cast member and sketch writer on Comedy Central's "Chappelle's Show." The Brooklyn native also co-wrote and acted in some of his younger brother Eddie Murphy's movies, including the 2007 comedy "Norbit."

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Comedian and actor Charlie Murphy, 57, was a cast member and sketch writer on Comedy Central's "Chappelle's Show." The Brooklyn native also co-wrote and acted in some of his younger brother Eddie Murphy's movies, including the 2007 comedy...more

Comedian and actor Charlie Murphy, 57, was a cast member and sketch writer on Comedy Central's "Chappelle's Show." The Brooklyn native also co-wrote and acted in some of his younger brother Eddie Murphy's movies, including the 2007 comedy "Norbit." REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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Gregg Allman, 69, was known for his soulful vocals that made the Allman Brothers Band one of rock's top acts in the 1970s with songs such as "Whipping Post," in a career also marred by tragedy and drug abuse. Gregg was the band's lead singer, keyboardist and a key songwriter as it put out a string of hits. He wrote several of them - "It's Not My Cross to Bear," "Midnight Rider," "Ain't Wastin' Time No More" and "Melissa". The band was an early progenitor of what became known as Southern rock. In addition to blues, the band also was known for its crystal guitar harmonies between brother Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, jazz influences and a free-wheeling approach that sometimes led to 20-minute songs. Rising above it all was Gregg's voice.

REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian

Gregg Allman, 69, was known for his soulful vocals that made the Allman Brothers Band one of rock's top acts in the 1970s with songs such as "Whipping Post," in a career also marred by tragedy and drug abuse. Gregg was the band's lead singer,...more

Gregg Allman, 69, was known for his soulful vocals that made the Allman Brothers Band one of rock's top acts in the 1970s with songs such as "Whipping Post," in a career also marred by tragedy and drug abuse. Gregg was the band's lead singer, keyboardist and a key songwriter as it put out a string of hits. He wrote several of them - "It's Not My Cross to Bear," "Midnight Rider," "Ain't Wastin' Time No More" and "Melissa". The band was an early progenitor of what became known as Southern rock. In addition to blues, the band also was known for its crystal guitar harmonies between brother Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, jazz influences and a free-wheeling approach that sometimes led to 20-minute songs. Rising above it all was Gregg's voice. REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian
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Former Haitian President Rene Preval, 74, was the first leader in Haiti's history to win a democratic election, serve a full term and peacefully hand power to a successor. Preval was a central figure in Haitian politics from the early nineties through to his second presidency. His legacy will always be tied to the 2010 earthquake that destroyed much of the capital, Port-au-Prince, killing more than 200,000 people and bringing the presidential palace crumbling to the ground.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Former Haitian President Rene Preval, 74, was the first leader in Haiti's history to win a democratic election, serve a full term and peacefully hand power to a successor. Preval was a central figure in Haitian politics from the early nineties...more

Former Haitian President Rene Preval, 74, was the first leader in Haiti's history to win a democratic election, serve a full term and peacefully hand power to a successor. Preval was a central figure in Haitian politics from the early nineties through to his second presidency. His legacy will always be tied to the 2010 earthquake that destroyed much of the capital, Port-au-Prince, killing more than 200,000 people and bringing the presidential palace crumbling to the ground. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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Michael Bond, 91, was the British creator of Paddington Bear, a marmalade sandwich-loving refugee from Peru who entertained generations of children with his exploits in London. Wearing a tag round his neck that read "Please look after this bear", Paddington was named after the London railway station of the same name where he was found after a boat journey from "darkest Peru", according to Bond's 1958 story "A Bear called Paddington". Bond said the inspiration for the character came when he spotted a teddy bear in his flat, and wondered what would happen if a real bear arrived at Paddington Station like a World War Two refugee with a label around his neck.

REUTERS/John Stillwell/Pool

Michael Bond, 91, was the British creator of Paddington Bear, a marmalade sandwich-loving refugee from Peru who entertained generations of children with his exploits in London. Wearing a tag round his neck that read "Please look after this bear",...more

Michael Bond, 91, was the British creator of Paddington Bear, a marmalade sandwich-loving refugee from Peru who entertained generations of children with his exploits in London. Wearing a tag round his neck that read "Please look after this bear", Paddington was named after the London railway station of the same name where he was found after a boat journey from "darkest Peru", according to Bond's 1958 story "A Bear called Paddington". Bond said the inspiration for the character came when he spotted a teddy bear in his flat, and wondered what would happen if a real bear arrived at Paddington Station like a World War Two refugee with a label around his neck. REUTERS/John Stillwell/Pool
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Former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega, 83, spied for the United States before his drug trafficking and brutality triggered a U.S. invasion to oust him in 1989. Noriega, who ruled Panama from 1983 to 1989, was a longtime collaborator of the Central Intelligence Agency and a useful U.S. ally in a region that was prone to leftist insurgencies. The invasion ordered by President George H.W. Bush brought an end to his career of money-laundering and cocaine smuggling, in which he worked with traffickers like Colombian Pablo Escobar. He was initially sentenced in the United States in 1992, but was serving a sentence for murder in Panama when he died.

REUTERS/Gary Hershorn

Former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega, 83, spied for the United States before his drug trafficking and brutality triggered a U.S. invasion to oust him in 1989. Noriega, who ruled Panama from 1983 to 1989, was a longtime collaborator of the...more

Former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega, 83, spied for the United States before his drug trafficking and brutality triggered a U.S. invasion to oust him in 1989. Noriega, who ruled Panama from 1983 to 1989, was a longtime collaborator of the Central Intelligence Agency and a useful U.S. ally in a region that was prone to leftist insurgencies. The invasion ordered by President George H.W. Bush brought an end to his career of money-laundering and cocaine smuggling, in which he worked with traffickers like Colombian Pablo Escobar. He was initially sentenced in the United States in 1992, but was serving a sentence for murder in Panama when he died. REUTERS/Gary Hershorn
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Barbara Sinatra, 90, was the fourth wife of singer Frank Sinatra. Born Barbara Blakely, she was a former model and Las Vegas showgirl who married the famed singer and actor in 1976. She had been married to him for 22 years when he died of a heart attack in 1998. She had previously been married to Zeppo Marx, the youngest of the Marx Brothers comedy team. It was the longest of Frank Sinatra's marriages, which included unions with actresses Ava Gardner and Mia Farrow, and teenage sweetheart Nancy Barbato. Frank and Barbara Sinatra founded the Barbara Sinatra Children's Center in Rancho Mirage, near Palm Springs, in 1986. The center counsels physically, sexually and emotionally abused children.

REUTERS/Jim Ruymen

Barbara Sinatra, 90, was the fourth wife of singer Frank Sinatra. Born Barbara Blakely, she was a former model and Las Vegas showgirl who married the famed singer and actor in 1976. She had been married to him for 22 years when he died of a heart...more

Barbara Sinatra, 90, was the fourth wife of singer Frank Sinatra. Born Barbara Blakely, she was a former model and Las Vegas showgirl who married the famed singer and actor in 1976. She had been married to him for 22 years when he died of a heart attack in 1998. She had previously been married to Zeppo Marx, the youngest of the Marx Brothers comedy team. It was the longest of Frank Sinatra's marriages, which included unions with actresses Ava Gardner and Mia Farrow, and teenage sweetheart Nancy Barbato. Frank and Barbara Sinatra founded the Barbara Sinatra Children's Center in Rancho Mirage, near Palm Springs, in 1986. The center counsels physically, sexually and emotionally abused children. REUTERS/Jim Ruymen
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Gilbert Baker (R), 65, was a San Francisco-based activist and artist best known for creating the rainbow flag representing gay rights. Baker was stationed in San Francisco in the early 1970s while serving in the U.S. Army, at the start of the gay rights movement. According to his website biography, Baker began making banners for gay rights and anti-war protests, often at the request of Harvey Milk, who would become the first openly gay man elected to public office in California in 1977. Milk rode under the first rainbow flags made by Baker at the San Francisco Gay Freedom Day Parade in June 1978, just months before the politician was murdered by a former city supervisor, the biography says.

REUTERS/Jeff Christensen

Gilbert Baker (R), 65, was a San Francisco-based activist and artist best known for creating the rainbow flag representing gay rights. Baker was stationed in San Francisco in the early 1970s while serving in the U.S. Army, at the start of the gay...more

Gilbert Baker (R), 65, was a San Francisco-based activist and artist best known for creating the rainbow flag representing gay rights. Baker was stationed in San Francisco in the early 1970s while serving in the U.S. Army, at the start of the gay rights movement. According to his website biography, Baker began making banners for gay rights and anti-war protests, often at the request of Harvey Milk, who would become the first openly gay man elected to public office in California in 1977. Milk rode under the first rainbow flags made by Baker at the San Francisco Gay Freedom Day Parade in June 1978, just months before the politician was murdered by a former city supervisor, the biography says. REUTERS/Jeff Christensen
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Actress and gospel singer Della Reese, 86, was best known for her role in the "Touched By An Angel" television series. Detroit-born Reese was trained as a gospel singer, and first found fame in the late 1950s and early 1960s with pop and jazz hits like "Don't You Know." By 1969, she had her own talk show "Della" - the first to be hosted by an African-American woman. She then landed roles in shows like "It Takes Two" and "Crazy Like a Fox". Her biggest part however was her role as the sarcastic supervisor angel Tess on the supernatural CBS TV series "Touched By An Angel," which ran for nine years until 2003. Reese also sang the title song "Walk With You."

REUTERS/Fred Prouser

Actress and gospel singer Della Reese, 86, was best known for her role in the "Touched By An Angel" television series. Detroit-born Reese was trained as a gospel singer, and first found fame in the late 1950s and early 1960s with pop and jazz hits...more

Actress and gospel singer Della Reese, 86, was best known for her role in the "Touched By An Angel" television series. Detroit-born Reese was trained as a gospel singer, and first found fame in the late 1950s and early 1960s with pop and jazz hits like "Don't You Know." By 1969, she had her own talk show "Della" - the first to be hosted by an African-American woman. She then landed roles in shows like "It Takes Two" and "Crazy Like a Fox". Her biggest part however was her role as the sarcastic supervisor angel Tess on the supernatural CBS TV series "Touched By An Angel," which ran for nine years until 2003. Reese also sang the title song "Walk With You." REUTERS/Fred Prouser
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Soul singer Charles Bradley, 68, had a difficult life, as a teen battling illiteracy, poverty, homelessness and unemployment. Unable to find success as a performer, he worked and traveled across the country as a cook and handyman while moonlighting as a James Brown impersonator under the name "Black Velvet". Late in life, he signed a record deal with Daptone Records, releasing his debut album "No Time for Dreaming" in 2011 at the age of 62. REUTERS/Gary Hershorn

Soul singer Charles Bradley, 68, had a difficult life, as a teen battling illiteracy, poverty, homelessness and unemployment. Unable to find success as a performer, he worked and traveled across the country as a cook and handyman while moonlighting...more

Soul singer Charles Bradley, 68, had a difficult life, as a teen battling illiteracy, poverty, homelessness and unemployment. Unable to find success as a performer, he worked and traveled across the country as a cook and handyman while moonlighting as a James Brown impersonator under the name "Black Velvet". Late in life, he signed a record deal with Daptone Records, releasing his debut album "No Time for Dreaming" in 2011 at the age of 62. REUTERS/Gary Hershorn
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New York gossip columnist Liz Smith, 94, helped lead the media's charge into celebrity news. The Texas native chronicled the lives of Hollywood and Broadway stars, along with moguls, models and the wealthy, starting in the 1950s. She famously broke the news of Donald Trump's separation from his first wife, Ivana, in the New York Daily News, one of several papers where she worked over the years. She also worked at New York Newsday and the New York Post. Her column was widely syndicated, and at her peak she earned more than $1 million a year, according to the New York Times. Unlike her predecessors in the gossip field, her coverage often had less to do with scandal and more about offering readers a window into the lives of the rich and famous.

REUTERS/Jim Ruymen

New York gossip columnist Liz Smith, 94, helped lead the media's charge into celebrity news. The Texas native chronicled the lives of Hollywood and Broadway stars, along with moguls, models and the wealthy, starting in the 1950s. She famously broke...more

New York gossip columnist Liz Smith, 94, helped lead the media's charge into celebrity news. The Texas native chronicled the lives of Hollywood and Broadway stars, along with moguls, models and the wealthy, starting in the 1950s. She famously broke the news of Donald Trump's separation from his first wife, Ivana, in the New York Daily News, one of several papers where she worked over the years. She also worked at New York Newsday and the New York Post. Her column was widely syndicated, and at her peak she earned more than $1 million a year, according to the New York Times. Unlike her predecessors in the gossip field, her coverage often had less to do with scandal and more about offering readers a window into the lives of the rich and famous. REUTERS/Jim Ruymen
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Actor and playwright Sam Shepard, 73, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1979 for his play "Buried Child," the story of a family's dark secret and, like many of his works, touched on disillusionment and broken families. His other plays included the Tony-nominated "True West," "Curse of the Starving Class" and "Fool for Love." Shepard's stoic manner and rugged good looks made him a solid choice to play test pilot Chuck Yeager in the 1983 film "The Right Stuff" - a role that earned him an Oscar nomination. His other films included "Days of Heaven," "August: Osage County," "The Notebook," "Black Hawk Down" and "Steel Magnolias."

REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Actor and playwright Sam Shepard, 73, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1979 for his play "Buried Child," the story of a family's dark secret and, like many of his works, touched on disillusionment and broken families. His other plays included the...more

Actor and playwright Sam Shepard, 73, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1979 for his play "Buried Child," the story of a family's dark secret and, like many of his works, touched on disillusionment and broken families. His other plays included the Tony-nominated "True West," "Curse of the Starving Class" and "Fool for Love." Shepard's stoic manner and rugged good looks made him a solid choice to play test pilot Chuck Yeager in the 1983 film "The Right Stuff" - a role that earned him an Oscar nomination. His other films included "Days of Heaven," "August: Osage County," "The Notebook," "Black Hawk Down" and "Steel Magnolias." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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Prodigy, 42, was born Albert Johnson and known as one half of New York rapper duo Mobb Deep. Mobb Deep, formed by rappers Prodigy and Havoc, from the New York City borough of Queens, was a seminal part of the 1990s East Coast gangsta rap scene emerging from New York alongside Nas and Notorious B.I.G., scoring a breakthrough with its 1995 album "The Infamous."

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Prodigy, 42, was born Albert Johnson and known as one half of New York rapper duo Mobb Deep. Mobb Deep, formed by rappers Prodigy and Havoc, from the New York City borough of Queens, was a seminal part of the 1990s East Coast gangsta rap scene...more

Prodigy, 42, was born Albert Johnson and known as one half of New York rapper duo Mobb Deep. Mobb Deep, formed by rappers Prodigy and Havoc, from the New York City borough of Queens, was a seminal part of the 1990s East Coast gangsta rap scene emerging from New York alongside Nas and Notorious B.I.G., scoring a breakthrough with its 1995 album "The Infamous." REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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Jonathan Demme, 73, was an eclectic movie director whose work ranged from thrillers like "The Silence of the Lambs" to documentaries on leading musicians. Demme's work was wide ranging, including comedy and thrillers to bold fare like 1993 film "Philadelphia," one of the first mainstream Hollywood movies to tackle the AIDS crisis. The movie brought an Oscar for Tom Hanks. Demme also directed concert and music documentaries for Bruce Springsteen, Kenny Chesney and Neil Young, the band Talking Heads, and more recently, "Justin Timberlake + the Tennessee Kids."

REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

Jonathan Demme, 73, was an eclectic movie director whose work ranged from thrillers like "The Silence of the Lambs" to documentaries on leading musicians. Demme's work was wide ranging, including comedy and thrillers to bold fare like 1993 film...more

Jonathan Demme, 73, was an eclectic movie director whose work ranged from thrillers like "The Silence of the Lambs" to documentaries on leading musicians. Demme's work was wide ranging, including comedy and thrillers to bold fare like 1993 film "Philadelphia," one of the first mainstream Hollywood movies to tackle the AIDS crisis. The movie brought an Oscar for Tom Hanks. Demme also directed concert and music documentaries for Bruce Springsteen, Kenny Chesney and Neil Young, the band Talking Heads, and more recently, "Justin Timberlake + the Tennessee Kids." REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
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Iraqi Kurdish leader and ex-Iraqi president Jalal Talabani, 83, was a veteran leader of the Kurdish struggle for self-determination and stepped down as president in 2014, after a long period of treatment following a stroke in 2012. He was the first non-Arab president of Iraq, elected in 2005, two years after the U.S.-led invasion that toppled dictator Saddam Hussein, a Sunni Arab. Fuad Masoum, a Kurd from the PUK, replaced Talabani in the Iraqi presidency, a largely ceremonial post in the political system established after Saddam's overthrow that concentrates power in the hand of the prime minister.

REUTERS/Hadi Mizban

Iraqi Kurdish leader and ex-Iraqi president Jalal Talabani, 83, was a veteran leader of the Kurdish struggle for self-determination and stepped down as president in 2014, after a long period of treatment following a stroke in 2012. He was the first...more

Iraqi Kurdish leader and ex-Iraqi president Jalal Talabani, 83, was a veteran leader of the Kurdish struggle for self-determination and stepped down as president in 2014, after a long period of treatment following a stroke in 2012. He was the first non-Arab president of Iraq, elected in 2005, two years after the U.S.-led invasion that toppled dictator Saddam Hussein, a Sunni Arab. Fuad Masoum, a Kurd from the PUK, replaced Talabani in the Iraqi presidency, a largely ceremonial post in the political system established after Saddam's overthrow that concentrates power in the hand of the prime minister. REUTERS/Hadi Mizban
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Two-time Emmy Award-winning actor Robert Guillaume, 89, became one of the most prominent black actors on U.S. television playing the cantankerous title character in the hit 1980s series "Benson." The gravelly voiced Guillaume, who thrived in Broadway musicals, was the first black actor to win an Emmy for outstanding lead actor for his role as Benson. Guillaume said he was sensitive about not playing his character as a racial stereotype and was pleased that Benson evolved from being a butler to a political power player - albeit one that retained the same crotchety attitude.

REUTERS/Stringer

Two-time Emmy Award-winning actor Robert Guillaume, 89, became one of the most prominent black actors on U.S. television playing the cantankerous title character in the hit 1980s series "Benson." The gravelly voiced Guillaume, who thrived in Broadway...more

Two-time Emmy Award-winning actor Robert Guillaume, 89, became one of the most prominent black actors on U.S. television playing the cantankerous title character in the hit 1980s series "Benson." The gravelly voiced Guillaume, who thrived in Broadway musicals, was the first black actor to win an Emmy for outstanding lead actor for his role as Benson. Guillaume said he was sensitive about not playing his character as a racial stereotype and was pleased that Benson evolved from being a butler to a political power player - albeit one that retained the same crotchety attitude. REUTERS/Stringer
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Carla Fendi (L, seen with designer Karl Lagerfeld), 79, was one of the five Italian sisters who transformed their parents' small leather workshop into an international luxury fashion powerhouse. She was the public face of the company famous for its line of colorful "baguette" bags that cost thousands of dollars. While other members of the family were the creative forces, Carla concentrated on promoting the company brand. In her later years, Fendi became a well-known patron of the arts. Deeply committed to Rome and its culture, her foundation financed the restoration of the city's famous Trevi Fountain.

REUTERS/Paolo Cocco

Carla Fendi (L, seen with designer Karl Lagerfeld), 79, was one of the five Italian sisters who transformed their parents' small leather workshop into an international luxury fashion powerhouse. She was the public face of the company famous for its...more

Carla Fendi (L, seen with designer Karl Lagerfeld), 79, was one of the five Italian sisters who transformed their parents' small leather workshop into an international luxury fashion powerhouse. She was the public face of the company famous for its line of colorful "baguette" bags that cost thousands of dollars. While other members of the family were the creative forces, Carla concentrated on promoting the company brand. In her later years, Fendi became a well-known patron of the arts. Deeply committed to Rome and its culture, her foundation financed the restoration of the city's famous Trevi Fountain. REUTERS/Paolo Cocco
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Martin Landau, 89, was a talented and prolific character actor who achieved TV stardom in "Mission: Impossible" and won an Oscar for his portrayal of a washed-up Bela Lugosi in the sweetly bizarre 1994 film "Ed Wood." His long career had remarkable ups and downs. He delivered acclaimed performances in movies by top directors including Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen and Tim Burton, was nominated three times for Oscars, and co-starred in the spy series "Mission: Impossible" in the 1960s alongside then-wife Barbara Bain. But during career doldrums, the New York-born Landau languished in third-rate projects such as the laughable 1981 TV movie "The Harlem Globetrotters on Gilligan's Island" and the dispensable 1983 mutant monster movie "The Being."

REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

Martin Landau, 89, was a talented and prolific character actor who achieved TV stardom in "Mission: Impossible" and won an Oscar for his portrayal of a washed-up Bela Lugosi in the sweetly bizarre 1994 film "Ed Wood." His long career had remarkable...more

Martin Landau, 89, was a talented and prolific character actor who achieved TV stardom in "Mission: Impossible" and won an Oscar for his portrayal of a washed-up Bela Lugosi in the sweetly bizarre 1994 film "Ed Wood." His long career had remarkable ups and downs. He delivered acclaimed performances in movies by top directors including Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen and Tim Burton, was nominated three times for Oscars, and co-starred in the spy series "Mission: Impossible" in the 1960s alongside then-wife Barbara Bain. But during career doldrums, the New York-born Landau languished in third-rate projects such as the laughable 1981 TV movie "The Harlem Globetrotters on Gilligan's Island" and the dispensable 1983 mutant monster movie "The Being." REUTERS/Danny Moloshok
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Johnny Hallyday, 74, was a rock and roll giant in his native France, surviving drug use, family strife and near-death episodes to strut the stage for more than 50 years. Known for his cowboy swagger, gravelly voice, abundant tattoos and leather biker jackets, the "French Elvis" had tens of millions of fans, above all in his native France, where he sold more records than any other singer.

REUTERS/Vincent Kessler

Johnny Hallyday, 74, was a rock and roll giant in his native France, surviving drug use, family strife and near-death episodes to strut the stage for more than 50 years. Known for his cowboy swagger, gravelly voice, abundant tattoos and leather biker...more

Johnny Hallyday, 74, was a rock and roll giant in his native France, surviving drug use, family strife and near-death episodes to strut the stage for more than 50 years. Known for his cowboy swagger, gravelly voice, abundant tattoos and leather biker jackets, the "French Elvis" had tens of millions of fans, above all in his native France, where he sold more records than any other singer. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler
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Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura, 25, was one of the hardest-throwing starting pitchers in the majors. Ventura had spent his entire major league career in Kansas City, helping the Royals to a World Series title in 2015 and posting a 13-8 record.

Kamil Krzaczynski-USA TODAY Sports

Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura, 25, was one of the hardest-throwing starting pitchers in the majors. Ventura had spent his entire major league career in Kansas City, helping the Royals to a World Series title in 2015 and posting a 13-8...more

Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura, 25, was one of the hardest-throwing starting pitchers in the majors. Ventura had spent his entire major league career in Kansas City, helping the Royals to a World Series title in 2015 and posting a 13-8 record. Kamil Krzaczynski-USA TODAY Sports
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Jazz and R&B singer Al Jarreau, 76, was a seven-time Grammy winner whose hits included "We're in This Love Together" and "Moonlighting." Jarreau was considered one of jazz's greatest vocalists, with a mastery of scat singing and vocal percussion. But his smooth, breezy hit "We're in This Love Together" from the 1981 album "Breakin' Away" made him a mainstream commercial success.

REUTERS/Herwig Prammer

Jazz and R&B singer Al Jarreau, 76, was a seven-time Grammy winner whose hits included "We're in This Love Together" and "Moonlighting." Jarreau was considered one of jazz's greatest vocalists, with a mastery of scat singing and vocal percussion. But...more

Jazz and R&B singer Al Jarreau, 76, was a seven-time Grammy winner whose hits included "We're in This Love Together" and "Moonlighting." Jarreau was considered one of jazz's greatest vocalists, with a mastery of scat singing and vocal percussion. But his smooth, breezy hit "We're in This Love Together" from the 1981 album "Breakin' Away" made him a mainstream commercial success. REUTERS/Herwig Prammer
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Zbigniew Brzezinski, 89, served as U.S. President Jimmy Carter's national security adviser during the Iran hostage crisis and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and drove a normalization of relations with China. Brzezinski, the hawkish son of a Polish diplomat and father of Mika, a host on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" show, was plucked by Carter from the academic world and saw many of the Soviet Union's foreign policy moves as evidence it could not be trusted.

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Zbigniew Brzezinski, 89, served as U.S. President Jimmy Carter's national security adviser during the Iran hostage crisis and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and drove a normalization of relations with China. Brzezinski, the hawkish son of a...more

Zbigniew Brzezinski, 89, served as U.S. President Jimmy Carter's national security adviser during the Iran hostage crisis and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and drove a normalization of relations with China. Brzezinski, the hawkish son of a Polish diplomat and father of Mika, a host on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" show, was plucked by Carter from the academic world and saw many of the Soviet Union's foreign policy moves as evidence it could not be trusted. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Lord Snowdon (C), 86, was the photographer former husband of Queen Elizabeth's late younger sister Princess Margaret. Snowdon, who was born Antony Armstrong-Jones, had a long and successful career as a society photographer and married Margaret at Westminster Abbey in 1960. They had two children but he had difficulty in adjusting from his previous bohemian lifestyle to the restrictions of public life. The couple divorced in a glare of publicity in 1978, the first such royal split since the days of Henry VIII four centuries earlier.

REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

Lord Snowdon (C), 86, was the photographer former husband of Queen Elizabeth's late younger sister Princess Margaret. Snowdon, who was born Antony Armstrong-Jones, had a long and successful career as a society photographer and married Margaret at...more

Lord Snowdon (C), 86, was the photographer former husband of Queen Elizabeth's late younger sister Princess Margaret. Snowdon, who was born Antony Armstrong-Jones, had a long and successful career as a society photographer and married Margaret at Westminster Abbey in 1960. They had two children but he had difficulty in adjusting from his previous bohemian lifestyle to the restrictions of public life. The couple divorced in a glare of publicity in 1978, the first such royal split since the days of Henry VIII four centuries earlier. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez
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Joseph Wapner, 97, was the former real-life judge who presided over "The People's Court" on reality television with a Solomonic presence that made him one of the best-known legal figures in the United States. Wapner handled two cases on each half-hour show, ruling with a commanding demeanor and basing decisions on his three decades as a lawyer and judge. He was stiff but sometimes showed a dry wit. The show made Wapner an unlikely judicial superstar and pop culture touchstone and its catchphrase - "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court, the People's Court" - worked its way into daily conversations.

REUTERS/Fred Prouser

Joseph Wapner, 97, was the former real-life judge who presided over "The People's Court" on reality television with a Solomonic presence that made him one of the best-known legal figures in the United States. Wapner handled two cases on each...more

Joseph Wapner, 97, was the former real-life judge who presided over "The People's Court" on reality television with a Solomonic presence that made him one of the best-known legal figures in the United States. Wapner handled two cases on each half-hour show, ruling with a commanding demeanor and basing decisions on his three decades as a lawyer and judge. He was stiff but sometimes showed a dry wit. The show made Wapner an unlikely judicial superstar and pop culture touchstone and its catchphrase - "Don't take the law into your own hands: you take 'em to court, the People's Court" - worked its way into daily conversations. REUTERS/Fred Prouser
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