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Pictures | Wed Aug 29, 2018 | 9:05pm IST

Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

The official estimate of Puerto Rico's death toll from Hurricane Maria, the most powerful storm to strike the Caribbean U.S. island territory in nearly 90 years, has been raised to 2,975, up from 64, Governor Ricardo Rossello said on Tuesday. Pictured: Milagros Nolazco carries her granddaughter Isya in the bedroom of her home, as a plastic sheet replaces the roof hit by Hurricane Maria in September, in a neighbourhood in Canovanas, Puerto Rico, April 2018. 


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

The official estimate of Puerto Rico's death toll from Hurricane Maria, the most powerful storm to strike the Caribbean U.S. island territory in nearly 90 years, has been raised to 2,975, up from 64, Governor Ricardo Rossello said on Tuesday....more

The official estimate of Puerto Rico's death toll from Hurricane Maria, the most powerful storm to strike the Caribbean U.S. island territory in nearly 90 years, has been raised to 2,975, up from 64, Governor Ricardo Rossello said on Tuesday. Pictured: Milagros Nolazco carries her granddaughter Isya in the bedroom of her home, as a plastic sheet replaces the roof hit by Hurricane Maria in September, in a neighbourhood in Canovanas, Puerto Rico, April 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Graves destroyed during Hurricane Maria are seen at a cemetery, in Lares, Puerto Rico, February 2018.


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Graves destroyed during Hurricane Maria are seen at a cemetery, in Lares, Puerto Rico, February 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Graves destroyed during Hurricane Maria are seen at a cemetery, in Lares, Puerto Rico, February 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Brandon Gomez (L) cuts Pablo Sanchez' hair with an electric razor, powered by a car battery outside his home in Naguabo, Puerto Rico, January 2018. 


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Brandon Gomez (L) cuts Pablo Sanchez' hair with an electric razor, powered by a car battery outside his home in Naguabo, Puerto Rico, January 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Brandon Gomez (L) cuts Pablo Sanchez' hair with an electric razor, powered by a car battery outside his home in Naguabo, Puerto Rico, January 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Jaimy Liz Villarini (L) and Magda Rodriguez sit in candle light at their home in Vega Alta, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Jaimy Liz Villarini (L) and Magda Rodriguez sit in candle light at their home in Vega Alta, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Jaimy Liz Villarini (L) and Magda Rodriguez sit in candle light at their home in Vega Alta, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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A woman looks as her husband climbs down a ladder at a partially destroyed bridge in Utuado, Puerto Rico, November 2017. 


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A woman looks as her husband climbs down a ladder at a partially destroyed bridge in Utuado, Puerto Rico, November 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A woman looks as her husband climbs down a ladder at a partially destroyed bridge in Utuado, Puerto Rico, November 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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The floor of a bathroom is seen covered in mud and debris in Utuado, Puerto Rico, January 2018. 


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

The floor of a bathroom is seen covered in mud and debris in Utuado, Puerto Rico, January 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

The floor of a bathroom is seen covered in mud and debris in Utuado, Puerto Rico, January 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Irma Arroyo reads a book with a flashlight at her home without power in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, January 2018. 



REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Irma Arroyo reads a book with a flashlight at her home without power in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, January 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Irma Arroyo reads a book with a flashlight at her home without power in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, January 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Cars drive under a partially collapsed utility pole, in Naguabo, Puerto Rico, October 2017. 


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Cars drive under a partially collapsed utility pole, in Naguabo, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Cars drive under a partially collapsed utility pole, in Naguabo, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Ruth Santiago refreshes herself with water from a pipe in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Ruth Santiago refreshes herself with water from a pipe in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Ruth Santiago refreshes herself with water from a pipe in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Ramona Olivera, 86, uses a solar lamp as she fills a bucket with water, in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico, May 2018. 


 REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Ramona Olivera, 86, uses a solar lamp as she fills a bucket with water, in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico, May 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Ramona Olivera, 86, uses a solar lamp as she fills a bucket with water, in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico, May 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Roberto Morales Santos, 70, looks out after posing for a portrait in his home, damaged by Hurricane Maria, in the municipality of Barranquitas outside San Juan, Puerto Rico, October 2017. 


REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Roberto Morales Santos, 70, looks out after posing for a portrait in his home, damaged by Hurricane Maria, in the municipality of Barranquitas outside San Juan, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Roberto Morales Santos, 70, looks out after posing for a portrait in his home, damaged by Hurricane Maria, in the municipality of Barranquitas outside San Juan, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
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Aurea Esther Gonzalez holds a bible dirty with mud, after Hurricane Maria hit the island in September, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, October 2017.   

REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Aurea Esther Gonzalez holds a bible dirty with mud, after Hurricane Maria hit the island in September, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Aurea Esther Gonzalez holds a bible dirty with mud, after Hurricane Maria hit the island in September, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Local residents walk in a river after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 2017. 


REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Local residents walk in a river after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Local residents walk in a river after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Ana Maria Jimenez, 89, lays on a bed, in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Ana Maria Jimenez, 89, lays on a bed, in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Ana Maria Jimenez, 89, lays on a bed, in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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A man stands on what is left of the balcony of his home and near another destroyed house, after the island was hit by Hurricane Maria in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, October 2017. 

REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A man stands on what is left of the balcony of his home and near another destroyed house, after the island was hit by Hurricane Maria in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A man stands on what is left of the balcony of his home and near another destroyed house, after the island was hit by Hurricane Maria in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Chickens walk through a house, which was partially destroyed by Hurricane Maria, at the squatter community of Villa Hugo in Canovanas, Puerto Rico, December 2017. Villa Hugo is a settlement initially formed by people whose houses were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Chickens walk through a house, which was partially destroyed by Hurricane Maria, at the squatter community of Villa Hugo in Canovanas, Puerto Rico, December 2017. Villa Hugo is a settlement initially formed by people whose houses were damaged or...more

Chickens walk through a house, which was partially destroyed by Hurricane Maria, at the squatter community of Villa Hugo in Canovanas, Puerto Rico, December 2017. Villa Hugo is a settlement initially formed by people whose houses were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Puerto Rican Debora Oquendo, 43, makes a phone call to a doctor for her 10-month-old daughter in a hotel room where she lives, in Orlando, Florida, December 2017. Oquendo and her baby girl Genesis Rivera share the hotel room, temporarily paid for by FEMA. They fled Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria destroyed their house.   

REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Puerto Rican Debora Oquendo, 43, makes a phone call to a doctor for her 10-month-old daughter in a hotel room where she lives, in Orlando, Florida, December 2017. Oquendo and her baby girl Genesis Rivera share the hotel room, temporarily paid for by...more

Puerto Rican Debora Oquendo, 43, makes a phone call to a doctor for her 10-month-old daughter in a hotel room where she lives, in Orlando, Florida, December 2017. Oquendo and her baby girl Genesis Rivera share the hotel room, temporarily paid for by FEMA. They fled Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria destroyed their house. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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A man tries to use his mobile phone outside his home, after Hurricane Maria hit the island and damaged the power grid in September, in Dorado, Puerto Rico, October 2017. 

REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A man tries to use his mobile phone outside his home, after Hurricane Maria hit the island and damaged the power grid in September, in Dorado, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A man tries to use his mobile phone outside his home, after Hurricane Maria hit the island and damaged the power grid in September, in Dorado, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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People collect mountain spring water, after Hurricane Maria hit the island, in Corozal, Puerto Rico, October 2017.

 REUTERS/Alvin Baez

People collect mountain spring water, after Hurricane Maria hit the island, in Corozal, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

People collect mountain spring water, after Hurricane Maria hit the island, in Corozal, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Residents hold their hands aloft to signal that they need water as UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters from the First Armored Division's Combat Aviation Brigade fly past during recovery efforts following Hurricane Maria, near Ciales, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Residents hold their hands aloft to signal that they need water as UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters from the First Armored Division's Combat Aviation Brigade fly past during recovery efforts following Hurricane Maria, near Ciales, Puerto Rico, October...more

Residents hold their hands aloft to signal that they need water as UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters from the First Armored Division's Combat Aviation Brigade fly past during recovery efforts following Hurricane Maria, near Ciales, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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A doctor checks the eyes of Hilda Colon at a shelter set up at the Pedrin Zorrilla coliseum after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, September 2017. 

REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

A doctor checks the eyes of Hilda Colon at a shelter set up at the Pedrin Zorrilla coliseum after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

A doctor checks the eyes of Hilda Colon at a shelter set up at the Pedrin Zorrilla coliseum after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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The contents of a damaged home can be seen as recovery efforts continue following Hurricane Maria near the town of Comerio, Puerto Rico, October 2017. 


REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

The contents of a damaged home can be seen as recovery efforts continue following Hurricane Maria near the town of Comerio, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

The contents of a damaged home can be seen as recovery efforts continue following Hurricane Maria near the town of Comerio, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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Alfredo Martinez, a mail man for the U.S. Postal Service delivers the mail at an area damaged by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, October 2017. 


REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Alfredo Martinez, a mail man for the U.S. Postal Service delivers the mail at an area damaged by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Alfredo Martinez, a mail man for the U.S. Postal Service delivers the mail at an area damaged by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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Buildings damaged by Hurricane Maria are seen in Lares, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Buildings damaged by Hurricane Maria are seen in Lares, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Buildings damaged by Hurricane Maria are seen in Lares, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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Milagros Jimenez poses for a picture at her house, which was partially destroyed by Hurricane Maria, at the squatter community of Villa Hugo in Canovanas, Puerto Rico, December 2017. Villa Hugo is a settlement initially formed by people whose houses were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. 


REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Milagros Jimenez poses for a picture at her house, which was partially destroyed by Hurricane Maria, at the squatter community of Villa Hugo in Canovanas, Puerto Rico, December 2017. Villa Hugo is a settlement initially formed by people whose houses...more

Milagros Jimenez poses for a picture at her house, which was partially destroyed by Hurricane Maria, at the squatter community of Villa Hugo in Canovanas, Puerto Rico, December 2017. Villa Hugo is a settlement initially formed by people whose houses were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Houses damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Maria stand at the squatter community of Villa Hugo in Canovanas, Puerto Rico, December 2017. Villa Hugo is a settlement initially formed by people whose houses were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. 

REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Houses damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Maria stand at the squatter community of Villa Hugo in Canovanas, Puerto Rico, December 2017. Villa Hugo is a settlement initially formed by people whose houses were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Hugo in...more

Houses damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Maria stand at the squatter community of Villa Hugo in Canovanas, Puerto Rico, December 2017. Villa Hugo is a settlement initially formed by people whose houses were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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A man stands inside of a destroyed supermarket by Hurricane Maria in Salinas, Puerto Rico, September 2017 REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A man stands inside of a destroyed supermarket by Hurricane Maria in Salinas, Puerto Rico, September 2017 REUTERS/Alvin Baez

A man stands inside of a destroyed supermarket by Hurricane Maria in Salinas, Puerto Rico, September 2017 REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Homes damaged by Hurricane Maria stand amid thousands of trees that have been exfoliated by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Homes damaged by Hurricane Maria stand amid thousands of trees that have been exfoliated by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Homes damaged by Hurricane Maria stand amid thousands of trees that have been exfoliated by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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Bare trees are seen at a residential area following Hurricane Maria in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, October 2017.

 REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Bare trees are seen at a residential area following Hurricane Maria in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez

Bare trees are seen at a residential area following Hurricane Maria in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, October 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Local residents ride a horse by a destroyed building after Hurricane Maria in Jayuya, Puerto Rico, October 2017 REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Local residents ride a horse by a destroyed building after Hurricane Maria in Jayuya, Puerto Rico, October 2017 REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Local residents ride a horse by a destroyed building after Hurricane Maria in Jayuya, Puerto Rico, October 2017 REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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U.S. and Puerto Rico flags hang on a damaged church after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Carolina, Puerto Rico, September 2017. 


REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

U.S. and Puerto Rico flags hang on a damaged church after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Carolina, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

U.S. and Puerto Rico flags hang on a damaged church after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Carolina, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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People rest outside a damaged house after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

People rest outside a damaged house after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

People rest outside a damaged house after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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A car submerged in flood waters is seen close to the dam of the Guajataca lake after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Guajataca, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

A car submerged in flood waters is seen close to the dam of the Guajataca lake after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Guajataca, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

A car submerged in flood waters is seen close to the dam of the Guajataca lake after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Guajataca, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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People stay at the roof of a damaged house after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

People stay at the roof of a damaged house after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

People stay at the roof of a damaged house after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, September 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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