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Pictures | Fri Nov 18, 2011 | 9:30pm IST

Rat killers of Mumbai

<p>Shakeel Sheikh, 24, wears his gloves as he prepares to kill rats outside a slaughter house in Mumbai, October 19, 2011.

 REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Shakeel Sheikh, 24, wears his gloves as he prepares to kill rats outside a slaughter house in Mumbai, October 19, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Shakeel Sheikh, 24, wears his gloves as he prepares to kill rats outside a slaughter house in Mumbai, October 19, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Waseem Sheikh, 12, holding an improvised stick searches for rats with the help of a torch outside a residential complex in Mumbai, October 21, 2011. 


REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Waseem Sheikh, 12, holding an improvised stick searches for rats with the help of a torch outside a residential complex in Mumbai, October 21, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Waseem Sheikh, 12, holding an improvised stick searches for rats with the help of a torch outside a residential complex in Mumbai, October 21, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Shakeel Sheikh, 24, wears his gloves as prepares to kill rats outside a slaughter house in Mumbai, October 19, 2011. The rat killers are expected to kill at least 30 rodents per night and hand over the carcasses to civic officials in the morning. If they fall short by even one rodent, they are expected to make it up the next night else they stand to lose a day's pay.  



REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

</p>

Shakeel Sheikh, 24, wears his gloves as prepares to kill rats outside a slaughter house in Mumbai, October 19, 2011. The rat killers are expected to kill at least 30 rodents per night and hand over the carcasses to civic officials in the morning. If...more

Shakeel Sheikh, 24, wears his gloves as prepares to kill rats outside a slaughter house in Mumbai, October 19, 2011. The rat killers are expected to kill at least 30 rodents per night and hand over the carcasses to civic officials in the morning. If they fall short by even one rodent, they are expected to make it up the next night else they stand to lose a day's pay. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Shakeel Sheikh, 24, holding an improvised stick searches for rats in an open ground outside a slaughterhouse in Mumbai, October 19, 2011. 

REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Shakeel Sheikh, 24, holding an improvised stick searches for rats in an open ground outside a slaughterhouse in Mumbai, October 19, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Shakeel Sheikh, 24, holding an improvised stick searches for rats in an open ground outside a slaughterhouse in Mumbai, October 19, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Javed Sheikh, 61, holds a rat by the tail as he tries to kill it by hitting on the ground in a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 29, 2011. About 44 night rat killers are employed by the pest control department of Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation to kill the rodents in the city. Employees of the pest control department get a salary of 15,000 to 17,000 Indian Rupees ($294 to $333) while the contract labourers are paid 5 Indian rupees ($0.10) per rat they kill.  


REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Javed Sheikh, 61, holds a rat by the tail as he tries to kill it by hitting on the ground in a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 29, 2011. About 44 night rat killers are employed by the pest control department of Brihanmumbai Municipal...more

Javed Sheikh, 61, holds a rat by the tail as he tries to kill it by hitting on the ground in a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 29, 2011. About 44 night rat killers are employed by the pest control department of Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation to kill the rodents in the city. Employees of the pest control department get a salary of 15,000 to 17,000 Indian Rupees ($294 to $333) while the contract labourers are paid 5 Indian rupees ($0.10) per rat they kill. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Javed Sheikh, 61, holds a rat by the tail as he tries to kill it by hitting on the ground at a residential complex in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. 


REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Javed Sheikh, 61, holds a rat by the tail as he tries to kill it by hitting on the ground at a residential complex in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Javed Sheikh, 61, holds a rat by the tail as he tries to kill it by hitting on the ground at a residential complex in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Dead rats lie on the ground as Sabbir Sheikh, 30, holding an improvised stick searches for more rats in Mumbai, October 20, 2011. 

 REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Dead rats lie on the ground as Sabbir Sheikh, 30, holding an improvised stick searches for more rats in Mumbai, October 20, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Dead rats lie on the ground as Sabbir Sheikh, 30, holding an improvised stick searches for more rats in Mumbai, October 20, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Javed Sheikh, 61, is helped by his daughter as he washes hands outside their house in a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 29, 2011. 

 REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Javed Sheikh, 61, is helped by his daughter as he washes hands outside their house in a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 29, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Javed Sheikh, 61, is helped by his daughter as he washes hands outside their house in a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 29, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Shakeel Sheikh, 24, holding an improvised stick searches for rats with the help of a torch outside a residential building in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. Mumbai is the only city in the world which employs full-time night rat killers. 

 
REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Shakeel Sheikh, 24, holding an improvised stick searches for rats with the help of a torch outside a residential building in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. Mumbai is the only city in the world which employs full-time night rat killers. REUTERS/Danish...more

Shakeel Sheikh, 24, holding an improvised stick searches for rats with the help of a torch outside a residential building in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. Mumbai is the only city in the world which employs full-time night rat killers. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Shakeel Sheikh, 24, puts dead rats in a plastic bag while making a count outside a residential complex in Mumbai, October 17, 2011. 


REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Shakeel Sheikh, 24, puts dead rats in a plastic bag while making a count outside a residential complex in Mumbai, October 17, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Shakeel Sheikh, 24, puts dead rats in a plastic bag while making a count outside a residential complex in Mumbai, October 17, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Javed Sheikh, 61, tries to kill a rat with an improvised stick at a garbage dump under a residential apartment in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. 


REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Javed Sheikh, 61, tries to kill a rat with an improvised stick at a garbage dump under a residential apartment in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Javed Sheikh, 61, tries to kill a rat with an improvised stick at a garbage dump under a residential apartment in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Javed Sheikh, 61, carries dead rats in a plastic sack through an alley in a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 18, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Javed Sheikh, 61, carries dead rats in a plastic sack through an alley in a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 18, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Javed Sheikh, 61, carries dead rats in a plastic sack through an alley in a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 18, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Rats are trapped in a cage after they were caught from a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 29, 2011. 


REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Rats are trapped in a cage after they were caught from a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 29, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Rats are trapped in a cage after they were caught from a slum area, on the outskirts of Mumbai, October 29, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Waseem Sheikh, 12, holding an improvised stick searches for rats with the help of a torch at a garbage dump in Mumbai, October 21, 2011. 

REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui</p>

Waseem Sheikh, 12, holding an improvised stick searches for rats with the help of a torch at a garbage dump in Mumbai, October 21, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Waseem Sheikh, 12, holding an improvised stick searches for rats with the help of a torch at a garbage dump in Mumbai, October 21, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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<p>Javed Sheikh, 61, tries to kill a rat with an improvised stick at a garbage dump under a residential apartment in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. 

 REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui </p>

Javed Sheikh, 61, tries to kill a rat with an improvised stick at a garbage dump under a residential apartment in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Javed Sheikh, 61, tries to kill a rat with an improvised stick at a garbage dump under a residential apartment in Mumbai, October 18, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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