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Pictures | Tue Oct 17, 2017 | 11:50pm IST

Staving off disease in Rohingya refugee camps

A Rohingya refugee boy who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, gets an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by UNICEF workers as he waits to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue his way to the refugee camps, in Palang Khali, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra

A Rohingya refugee boy who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, gets an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by UNICEF workers as he waits to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue his way to the refugee camps, in Palang...more

A Rohingya refugee boy who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, gets an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by UNICEF workers as he waits to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue his way to the refugee camps, in Palang Khali, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
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Rohingya refugees who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, receive bottles of water as they wait to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way to refugee camps, in Palang Khali, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra

Rohingya refugees who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, receive bottles of water as they wait to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way to refugee camps, in Palang Khali, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October...more

Rohingya refugees who crossed the border from Myanmar a day before, receive bottles of water as they wait to receive permission from the Bangladeshi army to continue their way to refugee camps, in Palang Khali, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 17, 2017. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
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A woman comforts her husband suffering from severe diarrhoea at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International in Kutupalong camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A woman comforts her husband suffering from severe diarrhoea at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International in Kutupalong camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A woman comforts her husband suffering from severe diarrhoea at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International in Kutupalong camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
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A Rohingya refugee child gets an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) with the help of volunteers and local NGOs, in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. The WHO began distributing 900,000 doses of cholera vaccine on Tuesday in Bangladesh's camps for Rohingya refugees fleeing from Myanmar, as authorities rush to prevent a major outbreak of the deadly disease.

REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A Rohingya refugee child gets an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) with the help of volunteers and local NGOs, in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. The WHO began distributing 900,000 doses of...more

A Rohingya refugee child gets an oral cholera vaccine, distributed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) with the help of volunteers and local NGOs, in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. The WHO began distributing 900,000 doses of cholera vaccine on Tuesday in Bangladesh's camps for Rohingya refugees fleeing from Myanmar, as authorities rush to prevent a major outbreak of the deadly disease. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Bottles with cholera vaccines to be distributed among Rohingya refugees in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. Doctors in two clinics have told Reuters that there have been several cases of patients with the symptoms of cholera, a virulent diarrhea that kills within 36 hours if not treated.

REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Bottles with cholera vaccines to be distributed among Rohingya refugees in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. Doctors in two clinics have told Reuters that there have been several cases of patients with the symptoms of cholera, a...more

Bottles with cholera vaccines to be distributed among Rohingya refugees in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. Doctors in two clinics have told Reuters that there have been several cases of patients with the symptoms of cholera, a virulent diarrhea that kills within 36 hours if not treated. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Temporary healthcare centers, where the oral cholera vaccine provided by the WHO is administered, are seen marked with yellow flags in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. The cholera vaccination campaign in Bangladesh, the second largest in history, will be crucial to containing any outbreak, said Dr N. Paranietharan, the WHO's representative in Bangladesh. More than 1,000 people will fan out across the sprawling camps on the southern tip of Bangladesh that are home to more than 519,000 Rohingya Muslims.

REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain

Temporary healthcare centers, where the oral cholera vaccine provided by the WHO is administered, are seen marked with yellow flags in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. The cholera vaccination campaign in Bangladesh, the...more

Temporary healthcare centers, where the oral cholera vaccine provided by the WHO is administered, are seen marked with yellow flags in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. The cholera vaccination campaign in Bangladesh, the second largest in history, will be crucial to containing any outbreak, said Dr N. Paranietharan, the WHO's representative in Bangladesh. More than 1,000 people will fan out across the sprawling camps on the southern tip of Bangladesh that are home to more than 519,000 Rohingya Muslims. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
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A man who was brought with some injuries and suffering from severe diarrhoea, recovers at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 6, 2017. "I believe we are facing a tsunami. We just don't know if it's going to be 10 feet or 50 feet," said Bruce Murray, a physician at the clinic. "Cholera is known to be endemic in Bangladesh and now we are bringing in half a million people in squalid conditions and it's got to be inevitable. It's a matter of when it hits, rather than if," he said.

REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A man who was brought with some injuries and suffering from severe diarrhoea, recovers at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 6, 2017. "I believe we are facing a...more

A man who was brought with some injuries and suffering from severe diarrhoea, recovers at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 6, 2017. "I believe we are facing a tsunami. We just don't know if it's going to be 10 feet or 50 feet," said Bruce Murray, a physician at the clinic. "Cholera is known to be endemic in Bangladesh and now we are bringing in half a million people in squalid conditions and it's got to be inevitable. It's a matter of when it hits, rather than if," he said. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
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A child suffering from severe diarrhoea is brought to a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 7, 2017. Murray said there could be "tens of thousands" of victims in an outbreak. Paranietharan said his organization had the capacity to handle 70,000 cholera cases.

REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A child suffering from severe diarrhoea is brought to a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 7, 2017. Murray said there could be "tens of thousands" of victims in an...more

A child suffering from severe diarrhoea is brought to a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 7, 2017. Murray said there could be "tens of thousands" of victims in an outbreak. Paranietharan said his organization had the capacity to handle 70,000 cholera cases. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
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Bruce Murray, a physician at the dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International, rests after treating patients suffering from severe diarrhoea at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 6, 2017. As well as a handful of clinics, mobile teams are ready to go to inaccessible parts of the camps with oral rehydration salts that can save cholera patients if they can't get access to intravenous fluids.

REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Bruce Murray, a physician at the dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International, rests after treating patients suffering from severe diarrhoea at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 6, 2017. As well as a handful of...more

Bruce Murray, a physician at the dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International, rests after treating patients suffering from severe diarrhoea at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 6, 2017. As well as a handful of clinics, mobile teams are ready to go to inaccessible parts of the camps with oral rehydration salts that can save cholera patients if they can't get access to intravenous fluids. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
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A woman holds her child suffering from severe diarrhoea at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 7, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A woman holds her child suffering from severe diarrhoea at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 7, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

A woman holds her child suffering from severe diarrhoea at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 7, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
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People suffering from severe diarrhoea lie in beds as they are treated at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

People suffering from severe diarrhoea lie in beds as they are treated at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

People suffering from severe diarrhoea lie in beds as they are treated at a dysentery clinic run by Medical Teams International at the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
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A Rohingya refugee child gets an oral cholera vaccine in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. Aid workers worry they lack the staff to get the vaccines out quickly, while the WHO says it urgently needs $10.2 million to do the job properly. The first round of the vaccination campaign will cover 650,000 people aged one year and older. A second round will target 250,000 children aged between one and five with an additional dose for extra protection.

REUTERS/Jorge Silva

A Rohingya refugee child gets an oral cholera vaccine in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. Aid workers worry they lack the staff to get the vaccines out quickly, while the WHO says it urgently needs $10.2 million to do the job...more

A Rohingya refugee child gets an oral cholera vaccine in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. Aid workers worry they lack the staff to get the vaccines out quickly, while the WHO says it urgently needs $10.2 million to do the job properly. The first round of the vaccination campaign will cover 650,000 people aged one year and older. A second round will target 250,000 children aged between one and five with an additional dose for extra protection. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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A healthcare member counts the cholera vaccines in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain

A healthcare member counts the cholera vaccines in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain

A healthcare member counts the cholera vaccines in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
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Rohingya refugee volunteers line up with numbers to form groups before the cholera vaccine distribution in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Rohingya refugee volunteers line up with numbers to form groups before the cholera vaccine distribution in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Rohingya refugee volunteers line up with numbers to form groups before the cholera vaccine distribution in a refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Rohingya refugees gather in front of a temporary healthcare center to get an oral cholera vaccine in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain

Rohingya refugees gather in front of a temporary healthcare center to get an oral cholera vaccine in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain

Rohingya refugees gather in front of a temporary healthcare center to get an oral cholera vaccine in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
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A healthcare member applies a gentian violet mark on a Rohingya refugee's finger after administering cholera vaccine in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain

A healthcare member applies a gentian violet mark on a Rohingya refugee's finger after administering cholera vaccine in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain

A healthcare member applies a gentian violet mark on a Rohingya refugee's finger after administering cholera vaccine in the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
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