Edition:
India
Pictures | Fri Nov 15, 2019 | 10:55pm IST

Sudan looks to pyramids to attract tourism

Creeping desert sands surround the Royal Cemeteries of Meroe Pyramids in Begrawiya at River Nile State, Sudan.   

REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Creeping desert sands surround the Royal Cemeteries of Meroe Pyramids in Begrawiya at River Nile State, Sudan. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Creeping desert sands surround the Royal Cemeteries of Meroe Pyramids in Begrawiya at River Nile State, Sudan. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
Close
1 / 11
Sudan has more - though smaller - pyramids than Egypt, but attracted only about 700,000 tourists in 2018 compared to some 10 million in its northern neighbor.   
REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Sudan has more - though smaller - pyramids than Egypt, but attracted only about 700,000 tourists in 2018 compared to some 10 million in its northern neighbor. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Sudan has more - though smaller - pyramids than Egypt, but attracted only about 700,000 tourists in 2018 compared to some 10 million in its northern neighbor. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
Close
2 / 11
Conflicts and crises under veteran ruler Omar al-Bashir, a tough visa regime and a lack of roads and decent hotels outside Khartoum have made Sudan an unlikely tourist destination. 
REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Conflicts and crises under veteran ruler Omar al-Bashir, a tough visa regime and a lack of roads and decent hotels outside Khartoum have made Sudan an unlikely tourist destination. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Conflicts and crises under veteran ruler Omar al-Bashir, a tough visa regime and a lack of roads and decent hotels outside Khartoum have made Sudan an unlikely tourist destination. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
Close
3 / 11
But Bashir lost power in April, and the new civilian transition government is easing visa rules to attract more visitors with their hard currency to places such as the Royal Pyramids of Meroe.    
REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

But Bashir lost power in April, and the new civilian transition government is easing visa rules to attract more visitors with their hard currency to places such as the Royal Pyramids of Meroe. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

But Bashir lost power in April, and the new civilian transition government is easing visa rules to attract more visitors with their hard currency to places such as the Royal Pyramids of Meroe. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
Close
4 / 11
Like the Egyptians, the Nubian Kush dynasty that ruled in the area some 2,500 years ago buried members of the royal family in pyramid tombs. Near Meroe's pyramids lie an array of temples with ancient drawings of animals and the ancient city of Naga, and there are more pyramids further north at Jebel Barka.   REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Like the Egyptians, the Nubian Kush dynasty that ruled in the area some 2,500 years ago buried members of the royal family in pyramid tombs. Near Meroe's pyramids lie an array of temples with ancient drawings of animals and the ancient city of Naga,...more

Like the Egyptians, the Nubian Kush dynasty that ruled in the area some 2,500 years ago buried members of the royal family in pyramid tombs. Near Meroe's pyramids lie an array of temples with ancient drawings of animals and the ancient city of Naga, and there are more pyramids further north at Jebel Barka. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
Close
5 / 11
The new government has already started relaxing the visa system, including dropping a permit required for travel outside Khartoum, said Graham Abdel-Qadir, undersecretary of the ministry of information, culture and tourism. "There has been already a rise of tourists in October and November thanks to the new system," he told Reuters.  
REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

The new government has already started relaxing the visa system, including dropping a permit required for travel outside Khartoum, said Graham Abdel-Qadir, undersecretary of the ministry of information, culture and tourism. "There has been already a...more

The new government has already started relaxing the visa system, including dropping a permit required for travel outside Khartoum, said Graham Abdel-Qadir, undersecretary of the ministry of information, culture and tourism. "There has been already a rise of tourists in October and November thanks to the new system," he told Reuters. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
Close
6 / 11
Arrivals fell this year because of unrest but numbers are expected to exceed 900,000 next year and might reach up to 1.2 million in 2021, he said.    
REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Arrivals fell this year because of unrest but numbers are expected to exceed 900,000 next year and might reach up to 1.2 million in 2021, he said. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Arrivals fell this year because of unrest but numbers are expected to exceed 900,000 next year and might reach up to 1.2 million in 2021, he said. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
Close
7 / 11
Sudan needs tourists after decades of isolation and hyperinflation.  REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Sudan needs tourists after decades of isolation and hyperinflation. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Sudan needs tourists after decades of isolation and hyperinflation. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
Close
8 / 11
At Meroe, thanks to money from Qatar and German expertise, a visitor's center has been set up explaining the history of Sudan and the pyramids. There are walking tracks and a new reception center.       
REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

At Meroe, thanks to money from Qatar and German expertise, a visitor's center has been set up explaining the history of Sudan and the pyramids. There are walking tracks and a new reception center. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

At Meroe, thanks to money from Qatar and German expertise, a visitor's center has been set up explaining the history of Sudan and the pyramids. There are walking tracks and a new reception center. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
Close
9 / 11
Visitors can for first time enter the pyramids' interior and will soon be able to go into tombs underneath, part of Qatar's $135 million aid. Several pyramids will be restored after decades of neglect.        
REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Visitors can for first time enter the pyramids' interior and will soon be able to go into tombs underneath, part of Qatar's $135 million aid. Several pyramids will be restored after decades of neglect. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Visitors can for first time enter the pyramids' interior and will soon be able to go into tombs underneath, part of Qatar's $135 million aid. Several pyramids will be restored after decades of neglect. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
Close
10 / 11
Sudanese tourists are also coming. "We had three buses (of Sudanese alone) yesterday," said Mahmoud Suleiman, head of the site.  
 
REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Sudanese tourists are also coming. "We had three buses (of Sudanese alone) yesterday," said Mahmoud Suleiman, head of the site. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Sudanese tourists are also coming. "We had three buses (of Sudanese alone) yesterday," said Mahmoud Suleiman, head of the site. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
Close
11 / 11

Next Slideshows

Germany marks 30 years since Berlin Wall fell

Berlin commemorates the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall with a celebration at the Brandenburg Gate.

12 Nov 2019

Ayodhya verdict

Pictures from across the country as Supreme Court rolled out verdict in Ayodhya site dispute.

10 Nov 2019

Britain marks Guy Fawkes' gunpowder plot with Bonfire Night

Britain celebrates the failed attempt to blow up the Houses of Parliament in 1605 by letting off fireworks and lighting bonfires with an effigy of the ...

06 Nov 2019

Day of the Dead

Celebrating Dia de los Muertos, when according to beliefs, the dead return to Earth to visit their loved ones.

04 Nov 2019

MORE IN PICTURES

Photos of the week

Photos of the week

Our top photos from the past week.

Eagle hunting in Kazakhstan

Eagle hunting in Kazakhstan

Hunters use tamed golden eagles and hawks during a traditional hunting contest Kazakhstan.

Editor's Choice Pictures

Editor's Choice Pictures

Our top photos from the last 24 hours.

Protests flare over India's citizenship law

The government has said the new law will be followed by a religion-based citizenship register.

New Zealand mourns after deadly volcano eruption

New Zealand mourns after deadly volcano eruption

The death toll is seen at 16 people and more than 20 are in hospital after a volcano erupted on White Island, where ongoing seismic activity is preventing teams from recovering eight people missing and presumed dead.

Pictures of the year: U.S. politics

Pictures of the year: U.S. politics

Our top U.S. politics photos from the past year.

Protests erupt as India passes citizenship law

Protests erupt as India passes citizenship law

Widespread protests intensified as the BJP-ruled government won parliamentary approval for a citizenship law that critics say undermines the country s secular constitution.

Greta Thunberg named Time's Person of the Year

Greta Thunberg named Time's Person of the Year

A look at the activism of Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old activist from Sweden who has urged immediate action to address a global climate crisis and was named Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2019.

Editor's Choice Pictures

Editor's Choice Pictures

Our top photos from the last 24 hours.

Trending Collections

Pictures

Podcast