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Pictures | Wed Aug 21, 2019 | 12:15am IST

Tourists retrace slave route from Africa

U.S. professor Joyce Hopescott, from Boston, stands at the 'Door of No Return' as she visits the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house, a gathering point where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 2019. Joyce said: "The legacy of slavery has not yet ended. Racism, racial discrimination, poverty, dispossession, oppression have not ended with the actual event of slavery (ending) itself. So even if we didn't want to remember, we are forced to because it is around us every day."  REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

U.S. professor Joyce Hopescott, from Boston, stands at the 'Door of No Return' as she visits the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house, a gathering point where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar,...more

U.S. professor Joyce Hopescott, from Boston, stands at the 'Door of No Return' as she visits the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house, a gathering point where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 2019. Joyce said: "The legacy of slavery has not yet ended. Racism, racial discrimination, poverty, dispossession, oppression have not ended with the actual event of slavery (ending) itself. So even if we didn't want to remember, we are forced to because it is around us every day." REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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A Senegalese boy walks from the 'Door of No Return' as he visits the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 2019. This month's anniversary of the first Africans to arrive in Virginia has caused a rush of interest in ancestral tourism, with people from the United States, the Caribbean and Europe seeking out their roots in West Africa.     
REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

A Senegalese boy walks from the 'Door of No Return' as he visits the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 2019. This month's anniversary of the first Africans to arrive in Virginia has caused a rush...more

A Senegalese boy walks from the 'Door of No Return' as he visits the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 2019. This month's anniversary of the first Africans to arrive in Virginia has caused a rush of interest in ancestral tourism, with people from the United States, the Caribbean and Europe seeking out their roots in West Africa. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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People play soccer as seen from the Cape Coast Castle, Ghana, August 12, 2019. REUTERS/Kweku Obeng

People play soccer as seen from the Cape Coast Castle, Ghana, August 12, 2019. REUTERS/Kweku Obeng

People play soccer as seen from the Cape Coast Castle, Ghana, August 12, 2019. REUTERS/Kweku Obeng
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A hut covers the site of a well where slaves drank water before they were boarded on ships at the historic port of Badagry, Nigeria.  REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A hut covers the site of a well where slaves drank water before they were boarded on ships at the historic port of Badagry, Nigeria. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A hut covers the site of a well where slaves drank water before they were boarded on ships at the historic port of Badagry, Nigeria. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Emmanuel Mouti Dongo from Cameroon visits the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house, a gathering point from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal July 2019. Emmanuel said: "The Slave House of the Goree Island is an historic site, a place of remembrance and is a very important journey that must be made by all Africans. Not to accuse but to heal and reconcile people in the hope of building a world more harmonious and more respectful of human rights and solidarity with each other."   REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Emmanuel Mouti Dongo from Cameroon visits the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house, a gathering point from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal July 2019. Emmanuel said: "The Slave House...more

Emmanuel Mouti Dongo from Cameroon visits the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house, a gathering point from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal July 2019. Emmanuel said: "The Slave House of the Goree Island is an historic site, a place of remembrance and is a very important journey that must be made by all Africans. Not to accuse but to heal and reconcile people in the hope of building a world more harmonious and more respectful of human rights and solidarity with each other." REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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Tourists visit the ruins of Kunta Kinte island in the Gambia River, near Jufureh, Albreda, on the North bank of Gambia, July 19, 2019. Kunta Kinte island was one of the slavery shipping points and is now named after a Gambian man from Juffrey, who according to Alex Haley's book, 'Roots:The Saga of an American Family', was among 98 slaves who were shipped to the United States in 1767.  
 REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Tourists visit the ruins of Kunta Kinte island in the Gambia River, near Jufureh, Albreda, on the North bank of Gambia, July 19, 2019. Kunta Kinte island was one of the slavery shipping points and is now named after a Gambian man from Juffrey, who...more

Tourists visit the ruins of Kunta Kinte island in the Gambia River, near Jufureh, Albreda, on the North bank of Gambia, July 19, 2019. Kunta Kinte island was one of the slavery shipping points and is now named after a Gambian man from Juffrey, who according to Alex Haley's book, 'Roots:The Saga of an American Family', was among 98 slaves who were shipped to the United States in 1767. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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A fisherman works in his boat as he fishes behind a rusting cannon, beside Kunta Kinteh Island, in the Gambia River, near Jufureh, Albreda, Gambia.   REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra

A fisherman works in his boat as he fishes behind a rusting cannon, beside Kunta Kinteh Island, in the Gambia River, near Jufureh, Albreda, Gambia. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra

A fisherman works in his boat as he fishes behind a rusting cannon, beside Kunta Kinteh Island, in the Gambia River, near Jufureh, Albreda, Gambia. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
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Charity Butler Agyemang, a Ghananian tour guide looks on at the Cape Coast Slave Castle in Ghana, July 2019. Charity said: "I think the 'Year of Return' has really helped in the tourism industry because we have a lot of people coming from the diaspora and beyond to invest and tour." Cape Coast Castle was used as a slaving post from where slaves were bought and sold and then shipped to the U.S. and other countries.   REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Charity Butler Agyemang, a Ghananian tour guide looks on at the Cape Coast Slave Castle in Ghana, July 2019. Charity said: "I think the 'Year of Return' has really helped in the tourism industry because we have a lot of people coming from the...more

Charity Butler Agyemang, a Ghananian tour guide looks on at the Cape Coast Slave Castle in Ghana, July 2019. Charity said: "I think the 'Year of Return' has really helped in the tourism industry because we have a lot of people coming from the diaspora and beyond to invest and tour." Cape Coast Castle was used as a slaving post from where slaves were bought and sold and then shipped to the U.S. and other countries. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko
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A disused building is seen on the beach where thousands of slaves were shipped away from the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin.   REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A disused building is seen on the beach where thousands of slaves were shipped away from the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A disused building is seen on the beach where thousands of slaves were shipped away from the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Villagers take part in a bathing ritual at the Bodo river in Kanga Nianze village, in Tiassale, that was built on a former slave route, Ivory Coast. Men and women captured in Ivory Coast and sold into slavery 400 years ago would take their final bath in the sacred River Bodo before the ship's journey to America.  REUTERS/Luc Gnago

Villagers take part in a bathing ritual at the Bodo river in Kanga Nianze village, in Tiassale, that was built on a former slave route, Ivory Coast. Men and women captured in Ivory Coast and sold into slavery 400 years ago would take their final bath...more

Villagers take part in a bathing ritual at the Bodo river in Kanga Nianze village, in Tiassale, that was built on a former slave route, Ivory Coast. Men and women captured in Ivory Coast and sold into slavery 400 years ago would take their final bath in the sacred River Bodo before the ship's journey to America. REUTERS/Luc Gnago
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A man uses a wheel barrow as he walks past a bas-relief of shackled slaves embedded on a plaque advertising the Mobee Royal Family Original Slave Relics Museum in Badagry, Nigeria.    REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A man uses a wheel barrow as he walks past a bas-relief of shackled slaves embedded on a plaque advertising the Mobee Royal Family Original Slave Relics Museum in Badagry, Nigeria. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A man uses a wheel barrow as he walks past a bas-relief of shackled slaves embedded on a plaque advertising the Mobee Royal Family Original Slave Relics Museum in Badagry, Nigeria. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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A bas-relief of shackled slaves is embedded in the wall of the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in Badagry, Nigeria.  REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A bas-relief of shackled slaves is embedded in the wall of the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in Badagry, Nigeria. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A bas-relief of shackled slaves is embedded in the wall of the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in Badagry, Nigeria. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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A man plays soccer on Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal. Goree island, a UNESCO world heritage site, was used as a slave gathering point from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s.   REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

A man plays soccer on Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal. Goree island, a UNESCO world heritage site, was used as a slave gathering point from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

A man plays soccer on Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal. Goree island, a UNESCO world heritage site, was used as a slave gathering point from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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Tourists walk away holding hands after visiting the Da-Silva slave museum in Porto-Novo, Benin.   REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Tourists walk away holding hands after visiting the Da-Silva slave museum in Porto-Novo, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Tourists walk away holding hands after visiting the Da-Silva slave museum in Porto-Novo, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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A tourist takes a photograph of ruins on the Kunta Kinte island in the Gambia River, Jufureh near Albreda, on the north bank of Gambia.   REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

A tourist takes a photograph of ruins on the Kunta Kinte island in the Gambia River, Jufureh near Albreda, on the north bank of Gambia. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

A tourist takes a photograph of ruins on the Kunta Kinte island in the Gambia River, Jufureh near Albreda, on the north bank of Gambia. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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People steer canoes on a lagoon by the bridge near the historic slave port town Ouidah, Benin.  REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

People steer canoes on a lagoon by the bridge near the historic slave port town Ouidah, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

People steer canoes on a lagoon by the bridge near the historic slave port town Ouidah, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Nuns visit the male section of the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house, a gathering point where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal.    REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra

Nuns visit the male section of the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house, a gathering point where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra

Nuns visit the male section of the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house, a gathering point where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal. REUTERS/ Zohra Bensemra
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A sculpture based on the Brookes ship illustration depicting how slaves were transported in a slave ship is seen at the Da-Silva museum in Porto-Novo, Benin.   REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A sculpture based on the Brookes ship illustration depicting how slaves were transported in a slave ship is seen at the Da-Silva museum in Porto-Novo, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A sculpture based on the Brookes ship illustration depicting how slaves were transported in a slave ship is seen at the Da-Silva museum in Porto-Novo, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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A man walks past a sign for the slave museum in Badagry, Nigeria. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A man walks past a sign for the slave museum in Badagry, Nigeria. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A man walks past a sign for the slave museum in Badagry, Nigeria. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Tourists ride in a ferry towards Goree Island, a gathering point from where slaves were shipped west, off the coast of Dakar, Senegal.     REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Tourists ride in a ferry towards Goree Island, a gathering point from where slaves were shipped west, off the coast of Dakar, Senegal. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Tourists ride in a ferry towards Goree Island, a gathering point from where slaves were shipped west, off the coast of Dakar, Senegal. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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A couple are seen walking away from the monument of 'Point of No Return' at the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin.   REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A couple are seen walking away from the monument of 'Point of No Return' at the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A couple are seen walking away from the monument of 'Point of No Return' at the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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A woman arranges some of her arts and craft carvings that are for sale at the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin.  
 REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A woman arranges some of her arts and craft carvings that are for sale at the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A woman arranges some of her arts and craft carvings that are for sale at the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Tourists are seen at The Memorial of the Great Jubilee of 2000 monument at the historic slave port of Ouidah in Benin.   REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde.

Tourists are seen at The Memorial of the Great Jubilee of 2000 monument at the historic slave port of Ouidah in Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde.

Tourists are seen at The Memorial of the Great Jubilee of 2000 monument at the historic slave port of Ouidah in Benin. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde.
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American tourist, Divine Koufahenou takes a picture of her Mother Afi and her friend Dawn Kravig at the 'Door of No Return' at the Cape Coast Slave Castle in Ghana, July 2019. Cape Coast Castle was used as a slaving post from where slaves were bought and sold and then shipped to the U.S. and other countries.  REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

American tourist, Divine Koufahenou takes a picture of her Mother Afi and her friend Dawn Kravig at the 'Door of No Return' at the Cape Coast Slave Castle in Ghana, July 2019. Cape Coast Castle was used as a slaving post from where slaves were bought...more

American tourist, Divine Koufahenou takes a picture of her Mother Afi and her friend Dawn Kravig at the 'Door of No Return' at the Cape Coast Slave Castle in Ghana, July 2019. Cape Coast Castle was used as a slaving post from where slaves were bought and sold and then shipped to the U.S. and other countries. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko
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A man looks out at the sea from a building known locally as 'The Tunnel' located near the 'Point of No Return' where slaves were shipped from the slave port at Badagry, Nigeria.       
 REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A man looks out at the sea from a building known locally as 'The Tunnel' located near the 'Point of No Return' where slaves were shipped from the slave port at Badagry, Nigeria. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A man looks out at the sea from a building known locally as 'The Tunnel' located near the 'Point of No Return' where slaves were shipped from the slave port at Badagry, Nigeria. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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