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Pictures | Thu Aug 29, 2019 | 11:15pm IST

West Africa's historic slave sites bear witness to brutal trade

A boy stands beside the Bodo river in Kanga Nianze village, built on a former slave route, near Tiassale, Ivory Coast, July 15, 2019. Men and women captured in Ivory Coast and sold into slavery 400 years ago would take their final bath in the river before being loaded onto ships. REUTERS/Luc Gnago

A boy stands beside the Bodo river in Kanga Nianze village, built on a former slave route, near Tiassale, Ivory Coast, July 15, 2019. Men and women captured in Ivory Coast and sold into slavery 400 years ago would take their final bath in the river...more

A boy stands beside the Bodo river in Kanga Nianze village, built on a former slave route, near Tiassale, Ivory Coast, July 15, 2019. Men and women captured in Ivory Coast and sold into slavery 400 years ago would take their final bath in the river before being loaded onto ships. REUTERS/Luc Gnago
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Abdoulie Jabang,30, a boat captain who transport tourists to Kunta Kinte Island, leads his boat off as he leaves the island on the Gambia River, near Jufureh, Albreda, Gambia, July 20. Kunta Kinte island was a slavery shipping point and is now named after a Gambian man from Juffrey, who according to the Alex Haley's book, Roots:The Saga of an American Family, was among 98 slaves who were shipped to the United States in 1767. "Kunta Kinte island is very important for me, is part of our history, for me is not only taking people to the island, many tourists I transported to the Island use to ask me how i feel this land ? we have to preserve this island for the young coming generations, we need to let them know about it we should never forget what this land have been used for. Emotionally I feel sad about my ancestors, the rough treatment used against them, a kind of uprooting.if you see the island is very small now because of the erosion and is under UNESCO protection, is good to preserve it as world heritage site and one of the slavery shipping point" Aboulie said. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Abdoulie Jabang,30, a boat captain who transport tourists to Kunta Kinte Island, leads his boat off as he leaves the island on the Gambia River, near Jufureh, Albreda, Gambia, July 20. Kunta Kinte island was a slavery shipping point and is now named...more

Abdoulie Jabang,30, a boat captain who transport tourists to Kunta Kinte Island, leads his boat off as he leaves the island on the Gambia River, near Jufureh, Albreda, Gambia, July 20. Kunta Kinte island was a slavery shipping point and is now named after a Gambian man from Juffrey, who according to the Alex Haley's book, Roots:The Saga of an American Family, was among 98 slaves who were shipped to the United States in 1767. "Kunta Kinte island is very important for me, is part of our history, for me is not only taking people to the island, many tourists I transported to the Island use to ask me how i feel this land ? we have to preserve this island for the young coming generations, we need to let them know about it we should never forget what this land have been used for. Emotionally I feel sad about my ancestors, the rough treatment used against them, a kind of uprooting.if you see the island is very small now because of the erosion and is under UNESCO protection, is good to preserve it as world heritage site and one of the slavery shipping point" Aboulie said. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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Daylight filters through a lock inside the court at the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in the historic slave port of Badagry, Nigeria June 19. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Daylight filters through a lock inside the court at the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in the historic slave port of Badagry, Nigeria June 19. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Daylight filters through a lock inside the court at the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in the historic slave port of Badagry, Nigeria June 19. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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A boy is pictured at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 8. Goree Island was one of the trans-Atlantic slave-trade gathering points from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, and today is a UNESCO world heritage site. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

A boy is pictured at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 8. Goree Island was one of the trans-Atlantic slave-trade gathering points from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, and today is a UNESCO world heritage site....more

A boy is pictured at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 8. Goree Island was one of the trans-Atlantic slave-trade gathering points from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, and today is a UNESCO world heritage site. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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Visitors walk though dungeons used to house female slaves at the Cape Coast Castle, one of several slave forts build along the Gold Coast in Ghana, July 28.  REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Visitors walk though dungeons used to house female slaves at the Cape Coast Castle, one of several slave forts build along the Gold Coast in Ghana, July 28. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Visitors walk though dungeons used to house female slaves at the Cape Coast Castle, one of several slave forts build along the Gold Coast in Ghana, July 28. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko
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A man takes a photo beneath the monument at the site of the 'Point of No Return' where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A man takes a photo beneath the monument at the site of the 'Point of No Return' where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A man takes a photo beneath the monument at the site of the 'Point of No Return' where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Fishermen are pictured in front of Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 7.   REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Fishermen are pictured in front of Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 7. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Fishermen are pictured in front of Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 7. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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A canon is seen at an old fort in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A canon is seen at an old fort in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A canon is seen at an old fort in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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A shrine is seen on a beach where thousands of African slaves were once loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A shrine is seen on a beach where thousands of African slaves were once loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A shrine is seen on a beach where thousands of African slaves were once loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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People stand beside a memorial beside the Bodo river in Kanga Nianze village, built on a former slave route, near Tiassale, Ivory Coast, July 21.  REUTERS/Luc Gnago

People stand beside a memorial beside the Bodo river in Kanga Nianze village, built on a former slave route, near Tiassale, Ivory Coast, July 21. REUTERS/Luc Gnago

People stand beside a memorial beside the Bodo river in Kanga Nianze village, built on a former slave route, near Tiassale, Ivory Coast, July 21. REUTERS/Luc Gnago
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A pulley hangs over a well at the Old English fort which once housed a now defunct slavery museum in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A pulley hangs over a well at the Old English fort which once housed a now defunct slavery museum in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A pulley hangs over a well at the Old English fort which once housed a now defunct slavery museum in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town, South Africa, August 28. The tree a milkwood is believed to be 500 years old and was originally located on a beach which has long since disappeared as the city reclaimed land from the sea for the expansion of it's port. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town, South Africa, August 28. The tree a milkwood is believed to be 500 years old and was originally located on a beach which has long since disappeared as...more

Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town, South Africa, August 28. The tree a milkwood is believed to be 500 years old and was originally located on a beach which has long since disappeared as the city reclaimed land from the sea for the expansion of it's port. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
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Open gates are seen before a monument at the site of the 'Point of No Return' where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Open gates are seen before a monument at the site of the 'Point of No Return' where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Open gates are seen before a monument at the site of the 'Point of No Return' where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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A commemorative building that is known locally as 'The Tunnel' is seen near the 'Point of No Return' from where slaves were shipped from the historic slave port at Badagry, Nigeria. June 21. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A commemorative building that is known locally as 'The Tunnel' is seen near the 'Point of No Return' from where slaves were shipped from the historic slave port at Badagry, Nigeria. June 21. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A commemorative building that is known locally as 'The Tunnel' is seen near the 'Point of No Return' from where slaves were shipped from the historic slave port at Badagry, Nigeria. June 21. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Canons are seen at the Cape Coast Castle, one of several slave forts build along the Gold Coast in Ghana, July 28. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Canons are seen at the Cape Coast Castle, one of several slave forts build along the Gold Coast in Ghana, July 28. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Canons are seen at the Cape Coast Castle, one of several slave forts build along the Gold Coast in Ghana, July 28. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko
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Prince Tete and his friend Coudjoe stand at a point where it is believed slaves once crossed the River Pra on their journey to the coast, at Assin Praso, Ghana, July 23. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Prince Tete and his friend Coudjoe stand at a point where it is believed slaves once crossed the River Pra on their journey to the coast, at Assin Praso, Ghana, July 23. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Prince Tete and his friend Coudjoe stand at a point where it is believed slaves once crossed the River Pra on their journey to the coast, at Assin Praso, Ghana, July 23. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko
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Young boys walk along a beach where slaves were once loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin July 18. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Young boys walk along a beach where slaves were once loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin July 18. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Young boys walk along a beach where slaves were once loaded onto ships in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin July 18. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Cape Town's Treaty Tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times is seen in Cape Town, South Africa, June 13. The tree a milkwood is believed to be 500 years old and was originally located on a beach which has long since disappeared as the city reclaimed land from the sea for the expansion of it's port. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Cape Town's Treaty Tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times is seen in Cape Town, South Africa, June 13. The tree a milkwood is believed to be 500 years old and was originally located on a beach which has long since disappeared as the city...more

Cape Town's Treaty Tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times is seen in Cape Town, South Africa, June 13. The tree a milkwood is believed to be 500 years old and was originally located on a beach which has long since disappeared as the city reclaimed land from the sea for the expansion of it's port. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
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A canoe is seen a lake beside the track leading to the "Door of No Return" where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port town Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A canoe is seen a lake beside the track leading to the "Door of No Return" where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port town Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A canoe is seen a lake beside the track leading to the "Door of No Return" where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port town Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town, South Africa, June 21. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town, South Africa, June 21. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town, South Africa, June 21. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
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A girl walks past buildings at the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in the slave port at Badagry, Nigeria, June 19. REUTERS/Afollabi Sotunde

A girl walks past buildings at the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in the slave port at Badagry, Nigeria, June 19. REUTERS/Afollabi Sotunde

A girl walks past buildings at the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in the slave port at Badagry, Nigeria, June 19. REUTERS/Afollabi Sotunde
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Tourists are seen at the Cape Coast Castle one of several slave forts build along the Gold Coast in Ghana, July 28. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Tourists are seen at the Cape Coast Castle one of several slave forts build along the Gold Coast in Ghana, July 28. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Tourists are seen at the Cape Coast Castle one of several slave forts build along the Gold Coast in Ghana, July 28. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko
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Hooks used to hang prayer mats are seen inside the court at the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in the historic slave port of Badagry, Nigeria June 19. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Hooks used to hang prayer mats are seen inside the court at the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in the historic slave port of Badagry, Nigeria June 19. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Hooks used to hang prayer mats are seen inside the court at the Seriki Abass Slave Museum in the historic slave port of Badagry, Nigeria June 19. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Two people walk along the route taken by slaves to the "point of no return" , from where they were shipped west, at the historic slave port of Badagry, Nigeria June 21. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Two people walk along the route taken by slaves to the "point of no return" , from where they were shipped west, at the historic slave port of Badagry, Nigeria June 21. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Two people walk along the route taken by slaves to the "point of no return" , from where they were shipped west, at the historic slave port of Badagry, Nigeria June 21. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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A woman stands beneath a monument commemorating the "Door of No Return" where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port town Ouidah, Benin, July 18. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A woman stands beneath a monument commemorating the "Door of No Return" where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port town Ouidah, Benin, July 18. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

A woman stands beneath a monument commemorating the "Door of No Return" where slaves were loaded onto ships in the historic slave port town Ouidah, Benin, July 18. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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Ruins are seen on Kunta Kinteh island in the Gambia River, Jufureh near Albreda, Gambia, July 20. Kunta Kinteh island was a slavery shipping point and is now named after a Gambian man from Juffreh who according to the Alex Haley's book, Roots:The Saga of an American Family, was among 98 slaves who were shipped to the United States in 1767. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Ruins are seen on Kunta Kinteh island in the Gambia River, Jufureh near Albreda, Gambia, July 20. Kunta Kinteh island was a slavery shipping point and is now named after a Gambian man from Juffreh who according to the Alex Haley's book, Roots:The...more

Ruins are seen on Kunta Kinteh island in the Gambia River, Jufureh near Albreda, Gambia, July 20. Kunta Kinteh island was a slavery shipping point and is now named after a Gambian man from Juffreh who according to the Alex Haley's book, Roots:The Saga of an American Family, was among 98 slaves who were shipped to the United States in 1767. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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Ruins are seen on Kunta Kinteh island in the Gambia River, Jufureh near Albreda, Gambia, July 20.  REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Ruins are seen on Kunta Kinteh island in the Gambia River, Jufureh near Albreda, Gambia, July 20. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Ruins are seen on Kunta Kinteh island in the Gambia River, Jufureh near Albreda, Gambia, July 20. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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Detail of an illustration of lines of chained slaves walking towards a ship is seen at a monument at the site of the 'Point of No Return' in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Detail of an illustration of lines of chained slaves walking towards a ship is seen at a monument at the site of the 'Point of No Return' in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Detail of an illustration of lines of chained slaves walking towards a ship is seen at a monument at the site of the 'Point of No Return' in the historic slave port of Ouidah, Benin, July 17. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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A general view of Goree Island is seen off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 8. Goree island was one of the trans-Atlantic slave-trade gathering points from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s and today is a UNESCO world heritage site. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

A general view of Goree Island is seen off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 8. Goree island was one of the trans-Atlantic slave-trade gathering points from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s and today is a UNESCO world heritage...more

A general view of Goree Island is seen off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 8. Goree island was one of the trans-Atlantic slave-trade gathering points from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s and today is a UNESCO world heritage site. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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Emmanuel Mouti Dongo from Cameroon visits the  Maison Des Esclaves  slave house on Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 7, 2019. Goree island, was one of the trans-Atlantic slave-trade gathering points from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800 and today is UNESCO world heritage site. "The Slave House of the Goree Island is an historic site, a place of remembrance,, is a very important journey that must be made by all Africans, to see the atrocity that humanity has lived for centuries,  emotionally, I was able to measure the extent and severity of the wounds suffered our ancestors African black undergone by by human beings like them. I discovered in my country Cameroon, in the coastal region, our ancestors were slaves owners and traders, it is important to continue to talk about the slavery as long as we are on earth that the generations to come, and ourselves can know what we experienced as an injury and what the human being could endure, not to accuse but to heal and reconcile the peoples in the hope of building a world more harmonious and more respectful of human rights and solidarity with each other", Sammuel said. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Emmanuel Mouti Dongo from Cameroon visits the Maison Des Esclaves slave house on Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 7, 2019. Goree island, was one of the trans-Atlantic slave-trade gathering points from where slaves were shipped...more

Emmanuel Mouti Dongo from Cameroon visits the Maison Des Esclaves slave house on Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, July 7, 2019. Goree island, was one of the trans-Atlantic slave-trade gathering points from where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800 and today is UNESCO world heritage site. "The Slave House of the Goree Island is an historic site, a place of remembrance,, is a very important journey that must be made by all Africans, to see the atrocity that humanity has lived for centuries, emotionally, I was able to measure the extent and severity of the wounds suffered our ancestors African black undergone by by human beings like them. I discovered in my country Cameroon, in the coastal region, our ancestors were slaves owners and traders, it is important to continue to talk about the slavery as long as we are on earth that the generations to come, and ourselves can know what we experienced as an injury and what the human being could endure, not to accuse but to heal and reconcile the peoples in the hope of building a world more harmonious and more respectful of human rights and solidarity with each other", Sammuel said. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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A view of Kunta Kinteh island in the Gambia River is seen near Jufureh, Albreda, Gambia, July 19. Kunta Kinteh island was one of the slavery shipping points and is now named after a Gambian man from Juffrey, who according to the Alex Haley's book, Roots:The Saga of an American Family, was among 98 slaves who were shipped to the United States in 1767. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

A view of Kunta Kinteh island in the Gambia River is seen near Jufureh, Albreda, Gambia, July 19. Kunta Kinteh island was one of the slavery shipping points and is now named after a Gambian man from Juffrey, who according to the Alex Haley's book,...more

A view of Kunta Kinteh island in the Gambia River is seen near Jufureh, Albreda, Gambia, July 19. Kunta Kinteh island was one of the slavery shipping points and is now named after a Gambian man from Juffrey, who according to the Alex Haley's book, Roots:The Saga of an American Family, was among 98 slaves who were shipped to the United States in 1767. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
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