Quake-hit Japan nuclear plant faces fresh threat

FUKUSHIMA, Japan Sun Mar 13, 2011 5:25am IST

1 of 36. Wreckages of cars and an airplane are seen at a devastated area after an earthquake and tsunami near Sendai airport in northern Japan, March 13, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Jo Yong-Hak

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FUKUSHIMA, Japan (Reuters) - Japan battled to contain a radiation leak at an earthquake-crippled nuclear plant on Sunday, but faced a fresh threat with the failure of the cooling system in a second reactor.

Operator TEPCO said it was preparing to release some steam to relieve pressure in the No.3 reactor at the plant 240 km (150 miles) north of Tokyo -- which would release a small amount of radiation -- following an explosion and leak on Saturday in the facility's No. 1 reactor.

As strong aftershocks continued to shake Japan's main island the desperate search for survivors from Friday massive earthquake and tsunami continued, and the death toll was expected to rise.

Thousands spent another freezing night huddled over heaters in emergency shelters along the northeastern coast, a scene of devastation after the 8.9 magnitude quake sent a 10-meter (33-foot) wave surging through towns and cities.

Kyodo news agency said the number of dead or unaccounted for as a result of the quake and tsunami was expected to exceed 1,800. It also reported there had been no contact with around 10,000 people in one small town, more than half its population.

The government insisted radiation levels were low following Saturday's explosion, saying the blast had not affected the reactor core container, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said it had been told by Japan that levels "have been observed to lessen in recent hours."

But Japan's nuclear safety agency said the number of people exposed to radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi plant could reach 160. Workers in protective clothing were scanning people arriving at evacuation centers for radioactive exposure.

Around 140,000 people had been evacuated from areas near the plant and another nuclear facility nearby, while authorities prepared to distribute iodine to people in the vicinity to protect them from radioactive exposure.

"There is radiation leaking out, and since the possibility (of being exposed) is high, it's quite scary," said Masanori Ono, 17, standing in line on Saturday to be scanned for radiation at an evacuation center in Fukushima prefecture.

Before news of the problem with reactor No. 3, the nuclear safety agency said the plant accident was less serious than both the Three Mile Island accident in 1979 and the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

An official at the agency said it has rated the incident a 4 according to the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES). Three Mile Island was rated 5 while Chernobyl was rated 7 on the 1 to 7 scale, the official said.

DEVASTATED COASTLINE

Along the northeast coast, rescue workers searched through the rubble of destroyed buildings, cars and boats, looking for survivors in hardest-hit areas such as the city of Sendai, 300 km (180 miles) northeast of Tokyo.

Aerial footage showed buildings, trains and even light aircraft strewn like children's toys after powerful walls of seawater swamped areas around Sendai.

In Iwanuma, not far from Sendai, nurses and doctors were rescued on Saturday after spelling S.O.S. on the rooftop of a partially submerged hospital, one of many desperate scenes. In cities and towns, worried relatives checked information boards on survivors at evacuation centers.

Dazed residents hoarded water and huddled in makeshift shelters in near-freezing temperatures.

"All the shops are closed, this is one of the few still open. I came to buy and stock up on diapers, drinking water and food," Kunio Iwatsuki, 68, told Reuters in Mito city, where residents queued outside a damaged supermarket for supplies.

Japan's Kyodo news agency said about 300,000 people were evacuated nationwide, many seeking refuge in shelters, wrapped in blankets, some clutching each other sobbing.

It said 5.5 million people were without power, while 3,400 buildings had either been destroyed or damaged. Four trains were unaccounted for after the tsunami.

In Tokyo, the usually bustling central districts were deserted on Saturday night, and the few in bars and restaurants were glued to television coverage of the disaster.

"Even in the bar we kept staring at the news," said Kasumi, a 26-year-old woman meeting a friend for a drink in the central district of Akasaka. "I looked at the tsunami swallowing houses and it seemed like a film."

NO REPEAT OF CHERNOBYL - EXPERTS

The blast at the nuclear plant raised fears of a meltdown at the power facility.

Experts had earlier said Japan should not expect a repeat of Chernobyl. They said pictures of mist above the plant suggested only small amounts of radiation had been expelled as part of measures to ensure its stability, far from the radioactive clouds Chernobyl spewed out 25 years ago.

Plant operator TEPCO has had a rocky past in an industry plagued by scandal. In 2002, the president of the country's largest power utility was forced to resign along with four other senior executives, taking responsibility for suspected falsification of nuclear plant safety records.

Many Japanese flooded social networking sites with worries about the plant.

"I can't trust TEPCO," said a person with the handlename Tanuki Atsushi on mixi, the Japanese social networking site.

The earthquake and tsunami, and now the radiation leak, present Japan's government with its biggest challenge in a generation.

The disaster struck as the world's third-largest economy had been showing signs of reviving from an economic contraction in the final quarter of last year. It raised the prospect of major disruptions for many key businesses and a massive repair bill running into tens of billions of dollars.

Foreign countries have started to send disaster relief teams to help Japan, with the United Nations sending a group to help coordinate work.

The earthquake was the fifth most powerful to hit the world in the past century. It surpassed the Great Kant quake of September 1, 1923, which had a magnitude of 7.9 and killed more than 140,000 people in the Tokyo area.

(Additional reporting by Risa Maeda in Tokyo and Fredrik Dahl in Vienna; Writing by Dean Yates; Editing by John Chalmers and Alex Richardson)

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (27)
user8192 wrote:
Top priority needs to be given to getting the nuclear reactors back on line to provide electric power for train service, hospitals and other essential services, such as water and sewer systems. If that is done, the population will be able to do considerably more to help themselves.

Mar 11, 2011 9:27am IST  --  Report as abuse
agentjacktoads wrote:
yeah they’ll probably need that electrical energy stuff to get that reactor going asap huh,so they can get the energy going to get the chain reaction going saa

Mar 11, 2011 10:12am IST  --  Report as abuse
RockyFlatsGear wrote:
Lets pray casualties are minimal and they get power restored quickly. Lets hope plant operators are more honest about radiation leaks than they had been in the past. We don’t need a big release of radioactive gas to add to the mess. Any reports of after shocks??

Mar 12, 2011 12:56pm IST  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

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